Stateside Staff http://michiganradio.org en Governor's race: where it stands now http://michiganradio.org/post/governors-race-where-it-stands-now <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Tomorr0w morning at 9:00 a.m. on Michigan Radio, it's your chance to ask questions of Mark </span>Schauer<span style="line-height: 1.5;">, the Democrat who wants to be your next governor.</span></p><p>Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark, co-hosts of Michigan Radio’s It’s Just Politics joined Stateside today to talk about where this race for governor stands right now.</p><p>Pluta&nbsp;discussed what issues Mark Schauer and Governor Snyder are focused now. &nbsp;He said the governor is focusing on the state's economic recovery and the fact that overall trend is improving. Schauer will likely focus on topics such as charter schools, and policies surrounding abortion coverage.&nbsp;</p><p>Clark added that the issue with the Schauer campaign is the lack of excitement to get out the vote among Democrats. Also, Pluta pointed out that Schauer still needed to work on public identification.</p><p>Check out our Facebook page for details on the number to call in tomorrow morning.</p><p><em>* Listen to the interview above.</em></p><p> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 22:29:14 +0000 Stateside Staff 18336 at http://michiganradio.org Governor's race: where it stands now Stateside for Thursday, July 10, 2014 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-thursday-july-10-2014 <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>Today on Stateside:</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; In just three years, the number of Michigan cities and school districts run by state-appointed emergency managers has ballooned, from six to 17. We took a close look at Michigan emergency manager law.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Mark Schauer is the Democrat who wants to be your next governor. Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark, the co-hosts of Michigan Radio’s It’s Just Politics were here on Stateside to tell us more.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A new appraisal of the Detroit Institute of Arts collection has found the works could be worth between $2.7 billion and $4.6 billion! That's a big difference from the $866 million value that Christie's put on the collection last fall. Detroit News’ Daniel Howes explained what the implication is.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; How Northern Michigan water is an inspiration for writers.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The latest "report card" on jobs in America points to a country continuing to recover from the Great Recession. We had a labor economist from University of Michigan to tell us what he saw in the June labor report.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; We wrap up our week-long review of the new $53 billion state budget. Today: the money for "law and order."</p><p><em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 22px; font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; vertical-align: baseline;">*Listen to full show above.</em></p><p> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 22:26:25 +0000 Stateside Staff 18329 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Thursday, July 10, 2014 DIA collection valued up to $4.6 billion as voting approaches home stretch http://michiganradio.org/post/dia-collection-valued-46-billion-voting-approaches-home-stretch <p></p><p>A<a href="http://michiganradio.org/post/report-dia-collection-worth-much-46-billion"> new appraisal </a>of the Detroit Institute of Arts' collection has found the works could be worth between $2.7 billion and $4.6 billion dollars. That's a big difference from the $867 million value that Christie's put on the collection last fall.</p><p>Detroit News Business columnist Daniel Howes joined us to tell us what he saw in the evaluations.</p><p>Howes clarified that the $867 million valuation by Christie’s only looked at 5% of the&nbsp;DIA’s collection, whereas the new appraisal evaluated its entire collection. He also pointed out the caveat attached to the big $4.6 billion number: “If you try to sell big chunks of the collection at the same time, you likely press the prices dramatically.”</p><p> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 22:25:39 +0000 Stateside Staff 18330 at http://michiganradio.org DIA collection valued up to $4.6 billion as voting approaches home stretch What June’s job report means for Michigan http://michiganradio.org/post/what-june-s-job-report-means-michigan <p></p><p>The latest "report card" on jobs in America points to a country continuing to recover from the Great Recession.</p><p>The national unemployment rate fell to 6.1%, the lowest level since September 2008. What does the June jobs report tell us about Michigan? Where have we made gains and where are we still hurting?</p><p>University of Michigan labor economist Don Grimes joined us to review the June employment numbers.&nbsp;</p><p> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 22:22:11 +0000 Stateside Staff 18332 at http://michiganradio.org What June’s job report means for Michigan Michigan state budget increased from last year to maintain law and order http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-state-budget-increased-last-year-maintain-law-and-order <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Today we wind up our week-long review of the new $53 billion state budget with a look at the money for "law and order."</span></p><p>Detroit Free Press Lansing reporter Kathy Gray was with us today.</p><p>Gray said that the new budget would have some more money to fight crime than last year. According to Gray, here are some of the things that the "law and order" money will fund:</p> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 21:58:04 +0000 Stateside Staff 18335 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan state budget increased from last year to maintain law and order Michigan authors reflect on lives near water through writing http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-authors-reflect-lives-near-water-through-writing <p></p><p></p><p>No matter the season, if you live in Michigan, water isn't far away.</p><p>The Great Lakes. One of Michigan's 11,000 inland lakes. A river, like the Manistee or Au Sable.</p><p>Traverse Magazine invited five Northern Michigan women writers to share their thoughts on water. Two of those writers join us today on Stateside from Interlochen Public Radio.</p><p><a href="http://anne-marieoomen.com/">Anne-Marie Oomen</a> grew up on a farm near Lake Michigan. She says that besides understanding from the very beginning the reliance of agriculture on water, she felt related to water in a spiritual way.</p><p><a href="http://fledabrown.com/">Fleda Brown</a> recalls fond memories of summer times spent near Michigan lakes as a child. “Driving up from Arkansas … and getting closer and closer to the lake and the woods, the first glimpse of water I saw through the trees was like miracle,” she said.</p><p><em>* Listen to full interview above.</em></p><p></p><p> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 18:31:57 +0000 Stateside Staff 18325 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan authors reflect on lives near water through writing A deep dive into Michigan’s emergency manager law http://michiganradio.org/post/deep-dive-michigan-s-emergency-manager-law <p></p><p>Three years ago, only a half-dozen cities and school districts in Michigan were being run by state-appointed emergency managers.</p><p>Today, 17 are in some phase of receivership.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">That proves not only cities and schools in Michigan are facing tough times, but that Governor Snyder is making vigorous use of <a href="https://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/2011-2012/publicact/pdf/2012-PA-0436.pdf">Public Act 436</a>,&nbsp;the state's emergency manager law.</span></p><p>Bridge magazine writer Chastity Pratt Dawsey&nbsp;examines the effectiveness of the law and how it measures up to similar laws in other states&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">in a <a href="http://bridgemi.com/2014/07/emergency-manager-or-emperor-why-michigans-law-stirs-contempt/">report </a>for the magazine's latest issue</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">. She joined us today.</span></p><p>We also had Lou Schimmel on the show. He's served as emergency financial manager or emergency manager for Ecorse, Hamtramck and Pontiac. Right now he's on the transition advisory board for Pontiac. Our two guests explores a number of questions:</p><p><strong>First off, why does the appointment of an emergency manager result in such emotional responses from residents?</strong></p><p> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 18:31:55 +0000 Stateside Staff 18327 at http://michiganradio.org A deep dive into Michigan’s emergency manager law Stateside for Wednesday, July 9, 2014 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-wednesday-july-9-2014 <p></p><p>Today on Stateside:</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Everybody's sore subject: roads and transportation. Continuing our week-long look at the new state budget: more than $53 billion, affecting every aspect of life in Michigan.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Snorkeling in Michigan? Nancy Washburne’s book: Snorkeling Guide to Michigan Inland Lakes.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Is Michigan ready to turn 'A New Leaf' on pot?</p><p>· &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;The Michigan Department of Community Health provides insight on arsenic issues.&nbsp;</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; We're going to be answering your questions about Michigan in our new project <a href="http://micurious.michiganradio.org/about">M I Curious</a>. It's a series of stories looking into all of the things you've always wondered about our state. The first question in our series: Why is there such a large Arab American community in southeast Michigan?</p><p><em>*Listen to full show above.</em></p><p> Wed, 09 Jul 2014 20:09:41 +0000 Stateside Staff 18317 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Wednesday, July 9, 2014 M I Curious: Why is there a large Arab population in Southeast Michigan? http://michiganradio.org/post/m-i-curious-why-there-large-arab-population-southeast-michigan <p></p><p>The M I Curious project is headed up by Michigan Radio’s Mark Brush.</p><p>“This is our chance to kind of pull back the curtain on news production and actually go out into the public and find out what the public is curious about,” Brush said.</p><p>We are inviting you into the editorial process of developing, producing and airing a story.</p><p>You can go to <a href="http://micurious.michiganradio.org/questions/answered">micurious.michiganradio.org</a> and post your question for us.</p><p>Three questions will be chosen for a vote by listeners each month. If your question is selected, you can participate in producing the story with us.</p><p>This month’s question comes from Jeff Duncan. His question:</p><p><em>What brought people of Arabic/ Middle Eastern decent to Michigan?</em></p><p>Michigan Radio’s Sarah Cwiek investigated and answered that question.</p><p>Cwiek said southeast Michigan has drawn so many Arabs because of two reasons. One the auto industry, specifically Henry Ford.</p><p>“There is apparently a legend that in the local Yemenite community that Henry Ford once met a Yemenite sailor and told him about these jobs in an auto factory that paid $5 a day,” Cwiek said.</p><p>The sailor passed on the word to others in Yemen and around the Arab world.</p><p>Cwiek said that though the first immigrants from the Arab world came in the nineteenth century, the explosion of Arab culture really started in the twentieth century.</p><p> Wed, 09 Jul 2014 19:54:37 +0000 Stateside Staff 18313 at http://michiganradio.org M I Curious: Why is there a large Arab population in Southeast Michigan? The Michigan Department of Community Health chimes in on the state's arsenic issue http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-department-community-health-chimes-states-arsenic-issue <p></p><p>Michigan Radio's "The Environment Report" has just wrapped up a week-long series called <a href="http://michiganradio.org/topic/michigans-silent-poison"><em>Michigan's Silent Poison</em>.</a></p><p>Reporter Rebecca Williams worked in partnership with the Center for Public Integrity and the public radio show <em>Reveal </em>to explore the problem of arsenic in well water.</p><p>Williams said Michigan has a serious problem with arsenic in private wells that can lead to major health issues.</p><p>Public water supplies have federal limits to regulate arsenic levels in water, however, private wells are not regulated.</p><p>The Thumb region in Michigan has the largest problem with high arsenic levels in private wells. Levels are as high as 20 times more than the federal accepted limit for arsenic in public water.</p><p>During the series Michigan’s Silent Poison, Williams made efforts to talk with someone from the Michigan Department of Community Health, but no one was made available. After the series aired, the Department said they would make someone available to speak.</p><p>Jennifer Gray is a toxicologist with the Michigan Department of Community Health.&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">She answered some of the questions on Stateside today.</span></p><p><em>*Listen to full interview above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Wed, 09 Jul 2014 19:51:01 +0000 Stateside Staff 18316 at http://michiganradio.org The Michigan Department of Community Health chimes in on the state's arsenic issue Michigan will receive $115 million to fix roads http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-will-receive-115-million-fix-roads <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Michigan will receive is $115 million in special state funding this year for 124 specific road projects in certain districts. &nbsp;This includes 38 projects in the metro Detroit region.</span></p><p>Crain’s Business Reporter Chris Gautz said most of the money will go to districts that are represented by Republicans, and about $41 million went to some districts represented by Democrats.</p><p>“For somebody in another part of the state that isn’t getting any money -- maybe if they are represented completely by Democrats -- they’re not going to see anything and they are wondering why their roads aren’t as important,” Gautz said.</p><p>Click <a href="http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/20140702/NEWS/140709947/38-metro-detroit-road-projects-get-special-funding-from-state-heres">here</a> for a full list of the projects.</p><p>Guatz said there will also be about $1.5 million dollars for the Secretary of State’s office to help combat insurance fraud.&nbsp;</p><p><em>*Listen to full interview above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Wed, 09 Jul 2014 17:23:57 +0000 Stateside Staff 18307 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan will receive $115 million to fix roads A new book takes a closer look at marijuana prohibiton http://michiganradio.org/post/new-book-takes-closer-look-marijuana-prohibiton <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;</span></p><p>Investigative journalists Alyson Martin and Nushin Rashidian present a book that explores the new landscape of cannabis in the United States in a book called<a href="http://www.anewleafbook.com/"> A New Leaf: The End of Cannabis Prohibition. </a></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Voters in 22 states, including Michigan, have said yes to medical marijuana laws. In November 2012, voters in Colorado and Washington legalized recreational use of marijuana.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Public opinion continues to shift toward policies that favor legalizing cannabis. </span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Yet, 49.5% of federal government drug-related arrests involve the sale, manufacture, or possession of cannabis.</span></p><p>In their book, Martin and Rashidian interviewed patients, growers, entrepreneurs, politicians, activists, and regulators in nearly every state with a medical cannabis law.</p><p>They analyze how recent milestones toward legalization will affect the war on drugs both domestically and internationally. The book is a unique account of how legalization is manifesting itself in the lives of millions.</p><p> Wed, 09 Jul 2014 17:11:54 +0000 Stateside Staff 18312 at http://michiganradio.org A new book takes a closer look at marijuana prohibiton Stateside for Tuesday, July 8, 2014 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-tuesday-july-8-2014 <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>Today on Stateside:</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Budget update: Everyone who writes a tuition payment check has one question: Is tuition going up?</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Why were 30 million pounds of tart cherries left to rot on the ground, much of those from Michigan? And why are we eating Polish and Canadian cherries in our pies?</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A West Michigan mom shares her son’s life with cerebral palsy in her memoir <em>He Plays A Harp.</em></p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A new board game called Mackinac Island Treasure Hunt.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; What can elected officials do to appeal to millennial voters?</p><p>· &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; The Cell Block 7 Prison Museum opens in&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">Jackson.</span></p><p><em>*Listen to full show above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 20:32:34 +0000 Stateside Staff 18297 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Tuesday, July 8, 2014 College tuition is expected to rise in Michigan http://michiganradio.org/post/college-tuition-expected-rise-michigan <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Everyone who writes a tuition payment check has one question: Is tuition going up?</span></p><p>Jake Neher, Lansing reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network said that tuition is going up all over the state.</p><p>There is a limit to the increase at 3.2%, otherwise institutions will lose state aid.</p><p>“Most major universities, other than U of M and MSU, are going right up to that cap in this year’s tuition increases,” Neher said.</p><p>Neher said budget leaders and the Legislature may not be too happy about the increase, given that the governor just signed the largest increase in state aid for higher education in years.</p><p>The new budget increases higher education spending by about 5.9%.</p><p>Neher added that Michigan State University is using a two-tier tuition increase. Tuition for juniors and seniors will go up more than freshmen and sophomores. Neher said that MSU did this because it costs more money to educate seniors.</p><p>Funding for the Michigan Tuition Grant Program will also increase 5.9%. This affects students who are in financial need who want to go to private colleges.&nbsp;</p><p><em>*Listen to full interview above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 20:32:06 +0000 Stateside Staff 18298 at http://michiganradio.org College tuition is expected to rise in Michigan A new board game that explores Mackinac Island http://michiganradio.org/post/new-board-game-explores-mackinac-island <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">There is a new board game called </span>“Mackinac<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Island Treasure Hunt.” It was created to get people thinking more about Michigan's natural beauty and historical treasures.</span></p><p>Jim Muratski, co- creator with Barbara Overdier, said they came up with the idea when they were in the woods thinking to themselves, “what’s a good way to have other people see what’s happening out here?”</p><p>“I think people are used to just visiting the downtown part of Mackinac Island and not really getting out into the state park area, which we find pretty fascinating,” Muratski said.</p><p>The board game is actually five games in one. There is a card game, a nature hike board game, a cooperative scavenger hunt game, a memory game, and a treasure hunt game.</p><p>More information on the board game is available <a href="http://www.mackinacislandtreasurehunt.com/">here</a>.&nbsp;</p><p>*<em>Listen to full interview above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 20:21:55 +0000 Stateside Staff 18295 at http://michiganradio.org A new board game that explores Mackinac Island The Cell Block 7 Prison Museum catalogs the prison's history http://michiganradio.org/post/cell-block-7-prison-museum-catalogs-prisons-history <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">It's been known for decades as the world's largest walled prison - the State Prison of Southern Michigan in Jackson.</span></p><p>Now some of the very colorful stories from that prison and from Jackson are told in the new Cell Block 7 Prison Museum. It's a joint venture of the Ella Sharp Museum and the Michigan Department of Corrections.</p><p>The museum is renting part of cell block seven, which still houses inmates.</p><p><a href="http://www.mlive.com/news/jackson/index.ssf/2014/06/10_stories_to_get_you_ready_fo.html">MLive’s Leanne Smith</a> said the museum covers the history of the prison, the inmates, wardens, and guards since 1838.</p><p>“It is an actual cell block,” Smith said. “You walk in and there is no doubt as to where you are.”</p><p>*<em>Listen to full interview above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 20:19:45 +0000 Stateside Staff 18296 at http://michiganradio.org The Cell Block 7 Prison Museum catalogs the prison's history "He Plays A Harp" A West Michigan Mom's story of her son with CP http://michiganradio.org/post/he-plays-harp-west-michigan-moms-story-her-son-cp <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">His name was Noah. He was born with cerebral palsy. When he was 17, he lost his battle against infections that had ravaged his lungs.</span></p><p>Noah's mother, Roberta King, is from West Michigan. She has shared the story of her son's life in her new memoir <em>He Plays A Harp</em><em>.</em></p><p>“It’s a joy to me to bring him to people that never knew him. And I think through that I feel a little less of the loss,” King said.</p><p>The story starts with the Noah’s conscious decision to die and then walks through his parent’s journey in dealing with the loss.</p><p>“A lot of parents experience the birth of their children. And, gratefully, not a lot experience their death,” King said. “I wanted people to know what that was like to walk your child from one place to another.”</p><p><em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 15px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; line-height: 22px;">*Listen to full show above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 18:30:00 +0000 Stateside Staff 18294 at http://michiganradio.org "He Plays A Harp" A West Michigan Mom's story of her son with CP Why were 30 million pounds of tart cherries left to rot on the ground? http://michiganradio.org/post/why-were-30-million-pounds-tart-cherries-left-rot-ground <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Get this, 75% of the nation's tart cherries are grown in Michigan, most of that in the northwest Lower Peninsula.</span></p><p>But every year the industry that brings us cherry pies and the Traverse City Cherry Festival faces restrictions set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.</p><p>Ron French, the Senior Writer for Bridge Magazine, said because so many tart cherries are grown in such a small area, the weather can greatly affect the crop. So the USDA puts a limit o<span style="line-height: 1.5;">n the percentage of Michigan's tart cherry crop that can be sold&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">so prices don't swing too dramatically.</span></p><p>“The result of that is that in some years as much as one half or more in cherries produced in Michigan is left rotting on the ground,” French said.</p><p>Most growers favor restrictions, but one food processing company in Elk Rapids is suing the U.S. Department of Agriculture.</p><p>French said Elk Rapids is hoping to remove the restrictions on cherries completely.</p><p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 17:47:01 +0000 Stateside Staff 18292 at http://michiganradio.org Why were 30 million pounds of tart cherries left to rot on the ground? What will get "millennials" into the voting booth? http://michiganradio.org/post/what-will-get-millennials-voting-booth <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The curtain is closing on baby boomers, as the so-called "millennial generation" is taking up a larger share of the electorate. This voting block surpasses seniors who are eligible to vote. </span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">But many </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">m</span>illennials<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> are not politically engaged.</span></p><p>“We feel that as one voice, as a younger person, we don’t have a lot of say in politics and I think that also drives their decision to remain out of the discussion as well,” said Connor Walby, a millennial and the campaign manager for State Rep. Frank Foster, R-Petoskey.</p><p>Walby also said the negative messages in politics that are seen on social media affect millennials' decision to vote as well.</p><p>“With our generation and having Twitter and Facebook, we are blasted with a lot of the 24 hour news cycle. And with that you also get a lot of the negative news coverage,” Walby said. &nbsp;“I think a lot of our generation is pretty sick and tired of some of the policies that have been put in place and they are just sick of the politicians and the political atmosphere in general.”</p><p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 15:48:15 +0000 Stateside Staff 18289 at http://michiganradio.org What will get "millennials" into the voting booth? Stateside for Monday, July 7, 2014 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-monday-july-7-2014 <p></p><p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>Today on Stateside:</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The money for K-12. There's nearly 14-billion dollars. Who's getting what?</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 73 years ago a Congressman from Washington State floated a new idea: build a highway from Alaska to Detroit.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Unsettling news in the war on HIV: cases in Washtenaw County hit a 15 year high.</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Every movement has its landmarks and history. And that certainly holds true for the gay rights movement. Other major American cities have had their LGBT history told, but what of Detroit?</p><p>·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; There is less interest in the “Up North” cottage market, however cottages are now cheaper than ever.</p><p><em>*Listen to full show above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Mon, 07 Jul 2014 20:44:24 +0000 Stateside Staff 18281 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Monday, July 7, 2014