Environment & Science http://michiganradio.org en Is the hybrid hype dying down? http://michiganradio.org/post/hybrid-hype-dying-down <p></p><p><span style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS'; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap; line-height: 1.365000057220459; background-color: transparent;">People may talk about wanting to be environmentally friendly but, when it comes to buying new cars, </span><span style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS'; font-size: 13px; line-height: 1.365000057220459; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">the data show they aren't spending their green on being green.</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.365000057220459;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS'; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap; line-height: 1.365000057220459; background-color: transparent;">Car buyers don’t actually end up buying hybrids and electrics even though they say it’s important to them.</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.365000057220459;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-0646ff47-1660-add1-ef19-861989012400" style="line-height: 1.365000057220459;"><span style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Trebuchet MS'; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">"Hybrids and plugins tend to be more expensive," says </span></span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Sonari</span><span style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS'; font-size: 13px; line-height: 17.7450008392334px; white-space: pre-wrap;"> </span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Glinton,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS'; font-size: 13px; line-height: 17.7450008392334px; white-space: pre-wrap;">NPR’s auto reporter.</span><span style="line-height: 1.365000057220459;"><span style="font-size: 13px; font-family: 'Trebuchet MS'; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;"> The advance drive market [hybrids, electric vehicles, plugin hybrids] has accounted for 3.6% of the market in the first half of 2014, a decline when compared to 3.8 % in the first half of 2013. Glinton says this market plateau is partially because shoppers are acclimating to higher gas prices. He thinks the other reason is "the novelty of these [hybrid] cars has worn off, so it's not like there's a big new electric car that people are like 'oh I gotta go out and buy that car.' "</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.365000057220459;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 18:55:26 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 18285 at http://michiganradio.org Is the hybrid hype dying down? Bass getting fat on invasive fish http://michiganradio.org/post/bass-getting-fat-invasive-fish <p><span style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Verdana, Arial; font-size: 13px; line-height: 18.200000762939453px;">The bass are getting fat.</span></p><p style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Verdana, Arial; font-size: 13px; line-height: 18.200000762939453px;">Lake Michigan was recently recognized as one of the best places in America to fish for bass. The booming fishery is one sign of what might be a major shift of the lake’s food web.</p><p style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Verdana, Arial; font-size: 13px; line-height: 18.200000762939453px;">But that change is being driven by an increase in goby, an invasive species. And it could spell trouble for salmon— the most popular sport fish in Lake Michigan. &nbsp;</p><p style="font-family: 'Trebuchet MS', Verdana, Arial; font-size: 13px; line-height: 18.200000762939453px;"> Thu, 10 Jul 2014 15:18:49 +0000 Peter Payette 18323 at http://michiganradio.org Bass getting fat on invasive fish The Michigan Department of Community Health chimes in on the state's arsenic issue http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-department-community-health-chimes-states-arsenic-issue <p></p><p>Michigan Radio's "The Environment Report" has just wrapped up a week-long series called <a href="http://michiganradio.org/topic/michigans-silent-poison"><em>Michigan's Silent Poison</em>.</a></p><p>Reporter Rebecca Williams worked in partnership with the Center for Public Integrity and the public radio show <em>Reveal </em>to explore the problem of arsenic in well water.</p><p>Williams said Michigan has a serious problem with arsenic in private wells that can lead to major health issues.</p><p>Public water supplies have federal limits to regulate arsenic levels in water, however, private wells are not regulated.</p><p>The Thumb region in Michigan has the largest problem with high arsenic levels in private wells. Levels are as high as 20 times more than the federal accepted limit for arsenic in public water.</p><p>During the series Michigan’s Silent Poison, Williams made efforts to talk with someone from the Michigan Department of Community Health, but no one was made available. After the series aired, the Department said they would make someone available to speak.</p><p>Jennifer Gray is a toxicologist with the Michigan Department of Community Health.&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">She answered some of the questions on Stateside today.</span></p><p><em>*Listen to full interview above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Wed, 09 Jul 2014 19:51:01 +0000 Stateside Staff 18316 at http://michiganradio.org The Michigan Department of Community Health chimes in on the state's arsenic issue Environmental groups say another Enbridge pipeline could be disaster in waiting http://michiganradio.org/post/environmental-groups-say-another-enbridge-pipeline-could-be-disaster-waiting <p>A "who's who" of environmental groups say a 67-year-old pipeline in the straits of Mackinac&nbsp; could be a serious threat to the Great Lakes.<br /><br />The pipeline is owned by Enbridge. &nbsp;<br /><br />Howard Learner is head of the Environmental Law and Policy Center.</p><p>"It's an old aging pipeline," says Learner.&nbsp; "We can't afford to have happen in the Great Lakes what happened with the Enbridge pipeline and the oil spill in the Kalamazoo River.&nbsp; You know, it's already been a couple of years and we are still cleaning it up.&nbsp; "</p><p>In 2010, more than a million gallons of oil spilled into the Kalamazoo River after an Enbridge pipeline rupture.</p><p>Lerner's group, along with 16 other major environmental groups in Michigan, have sent a <a href="http://flowforwater.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/2014-07-01-FINAL-Line-5-Governor-Ltr-Sign-On.pdf">letter</a> requesting an urgent meeting with Governor Snyder about the pipeline.</p><p>Learner says Enbridge may not be maintaining the pipeline properly, including not installing enough supports for the pipeline.&nbsp;</p><p>And he says the company may be sending oil through it under too much pressure, but there's no way to know until the state forces the company to disclose the information.</p><p>There's also a question whether state&nbsp; regulations written more than 60 years ago meet current standards.</p><p><em>*Correction - A previous version of this story said "more than a million barrels of oil spilled." It was more than a million gallons. Story corrected above.</em> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 22:03:32 +0000 Tracy Samilton 18301 at http://michiganradio.org Environmental groups say another Enbridge pipeline could be disaster in waiting Demolished GM plants could get cleaned up next year http://michiganradio.org/post/demolished-gm-plants-could-get-cleaned-next-year <p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;">Three demolished General Motors plants could get state approval for cleanup, starting next year.</span></p> Mon, 07 Jul 2014 20:33:41 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 18282 at http://michiganradio.org Demolished GM plants could get cleaned up next year Vacant lots in Flint are becoming urban gardens http://michiganradio.org/post/vacant-lots-flint-are-becoming-urban-gardens <p>There are more than 12,000 vacant lots in Flint, and Genesee county is trying to change that.</p> Mon, 07 Jul 2014 20:00:20 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 18283 at http://michiganradio.org Vacant lots in Flint are becoming urban gardens Making plans for the future of the Kirtland's warbler in Michigan http://michiganradio.org/post/making-plans-future-kirtlands-warbler-michigan <p>The <a href="http://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/birds/Kirtland/">Kirtland’s warbler</a> is starting its migration from Michigan to the Caribbean.</p><p>By the time the song birds return to their Michigan breeding grounds next year, <a href="http://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/birds/Kirtland/pdf/KIWA_MOU27April2011.pdf">the Kirtland’s warbler may no longer be listed as an endangered species. &nbsp;</a></p> Mon, 07 Jul 2014 13:57:31 +0000 Steve Carmody 18254 at http://michiganradio.org Making plans for the future of the Kirtland's warbler in Michigan What researchers are finding out about low-level exposure to arsenic http://michiganradio.org/post/what-researchers-are-finding-out-about-low-level-exposure-arsenic <p></p><p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;">This week, the Environment Report is taking a look at </span><a href="http://michiganradio.org/term/michigans-silent-poison" style="font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;">Michigan’s silent poison</a><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;"> — arsenic.</span></p><p><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;">Federal standards allow public drinking water supplies to have arsenic levels of up to 10 parts per billion (ppb), but these standards do not apply to private well owners (that's left up to the well owner to determine).</span><br style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;" /><br style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;" /><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;">And in counties throughout Michigan, some wells have much higher levels of arsenic than this "maximum contaminant level" set by the EPA.</span><br style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;" /><br style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;" /><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;">Higher levels of arsenic in drinking water have been linked to skin cancer, lung cancer, and bladder cancer, among others.</span><br style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;" /><br style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;" /><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial; font-size: small; line-height: normal;">But are lower levels of arsenic a threat to human health?</span></p><p> Fri, 04 Jul 2014 14:16:00 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 18245 at http://michiganradio.org What researchers are finding out about low-level exposure to arsenic One congressman has kept us in the dark about the health risks of arsenic http://michiganradio.org/post/one-congressman-has-kept-us-dark-about-health-risks-arsenic <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Arsenic occurs naturally, and Michigan is one of a handful of states with unusually high arsenic concentrations in groundwater.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Arsenic was also used in insecticides for many years and it's still being used in some weed killers.</span></p><p>David Heath is a senior reporter at the Center for Public Integrity, and <a href="http://www.publicintegrity.org/2014/06/28/15000/how-politics-derailed-epa-science-arsenic-endangering-public-health">he investigated</a> why a health assessment on arsenic from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been delayed.</p><p><strong style="line-height: 1.5;">Why does this health assessment matter?</strong></p><p>Heath said when the EPA first wants to determine how dangerous a toxic chemical is, they first do the science. These assessments can take a long time and the arsenic assessment has been going on for more than a decade.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">"It's not until they have done the science to figure out exactly how dangerous a chemical is that they can really take action on it," Heath said. "So it really does come down to 'this is how they protect your health.'"</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">A single member of Congress, Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, was able to intentionally delay the EPA's health assessment for years.</span></p><p> Fri, 04 Jul 2014 12:30:00 +0000 Rebecca Williams 18159 at http://michiganradio.org One congressman has kept us in the dark about the health risks of arsenic State approves oil well permit for Scio Township http://michiganradio.org/post/state-approves-oil-well-permit-scio-township <p>The state has approved a permit for a controversial exploratory oil well in Scio Township close to Ann Arbor.<br /><br />The approval came despite fierce opposition from residents and Scio Township's board of trustees.<br /><br />Adam Wygant is with the state Department of Environmental Quality.</p><p>He says because of the public comments, the state took two months to study the application - much longer than the 24 days it normally takes to approve a permit for an exploratory oil well.</p> Thu, 03 Jul 2014 21:01:16 +0000 Tracy Samilton 18265 at http://michiganradio.org State approves oil well permit for Scio Township What should we do about the arsenic in our food? Experts say vary your diet, research ongoing http://michiganradio.org/post/what-should-we-do-about-arsenic-our-food-experts-say-vary-your-diet-research-ongoing <p>All this week, we’ve been talking about the potential for elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater in Michigan.</p><p>The upshot of our <a href="http://michiganradio.org/topic/michigans-silent-poison">reports</a>:</p><ol><li>Arsenic levels in Michigan’s groundwater can be high.</li><li>Arsenic is bad for you.</li><li>Scientists are finding health effects at lower exposure levels.</li><li>If you’re on a well, test it for arsenic.</li><li>If the levels are high, you should consider doing something about it.</li></ol><p>This one chart published by the<a href="http://www.publicintegrity.org/2014/06/28/14994/lifetime-cancer-risk"> Center for Public Integrity</a> shows you why (the blue bar is arsenic):</p><p> Thu, 03 Jul 2014 14:45:00 +0000 Mark Brush 18250 at http://michiganradio.org What should we do about the arsenic in our food? Experts say vary your diet, research ongoing These places in Michigan are still working on getting arsenic out of their drinking water http://michiganradio.org/post/these-places-michigan-are-still-working-getting-arsenic-out-their-drinking-water <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">There’s no way to tell if arsenic is in your water without testing it. Arsenic has no taste and no smell.</span></p><p>Certain parts of Michigan have higher than average levels of arsenic in groundwater. That’s especially true in the Thumb region and a few other counties in southeast Michigan. And that can be a problem if you’re on a private well.</p> Thu, 03 Jul 2014 12:30:00 +0000 Rebecca Williams 18173 at http://michiganradio.org These places in Michigan are still working on getting arsenic out of their drinking water Appeals court says no drilling in Pigeon River forest http://michiganradio.org/post/appeals-court-says-no-drilling-pigeon-river-forest <p>The Michigan Court of Appeals says state regulators were correct to deny a drilling permit to developers who want to put oil wells on private land surrounded by a state forest.</p><p></p><p>The developers said the state should either grant the permit, or compensate them for their lost investment. They want to put 11 wells on private property surrounded by the Pigeon River Country State Forest in northern lower Michigan. The state Department of Environmental Quality said the wells were either in designated no-drill zones, or were too close to water.</p><p></p><p>“The takeaway from this decision is that you can’t drill an oil well just any old place in the state of Michigan,” said DEQ spokesman Brad Wurful. “There are some areas that are off limits.”</p><p></p><p>And the decision says since that was clear up front, the developers don’t get a payback from the state.</p><p></p><p>“What the court said was, everybody knew this beforehand going into this and it was clear,” Wurful said. “Nobody got surprised here. They simply wanted to do something that was not allowed and the court upheld that. We’re pretty pleased with the decision, obviously.”</p><p></p><p>The developers can file a new permit request with plans to use different technology, like directional drilling. They can also take their case to the Michigan Supreme Court.</p><p> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 21:31:02 +0000 Rick Pluta 18251 at http://michiganradio.org Appeals court says no drilling in Pigeon River forest Politics, profits delay action on arsenic in drinking water http://michiganradio.org/post/politics-profits-delay-action-arsenic-drinking-water <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Arsenic is nearly synonymous with poison. But most people don't realize that they consume small amounts of it in the food they eat and the water they drink.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Recent research suggests even small levels of arsenic may be harmful. In fact, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been prepared to say since 2008 that arsenic is 17 times more toxic as a carcinogen than the agency now reports.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Women are especially vulnerable.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">EPA scientists have concluded that if 100,000 women consumed the legal limit of arsenic each day, 730 of them eventually would get lung or bladder cancer.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The EPA, however, hasn’t been able to make its findings official, an action that could trigger stricter drinking water standards. The roadblock: a single paragraph inserted into a committee report by a member of Congress, an investigation by the Center for Public Integrity found.</span></p><p> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 14:33:00 +0000 David Heath 18220 at http://michiganradio.org Politics, profits delay action on arsenic in drinking water There's arsenic in Michigan's well water, but not a lot of people are talking about it http://michiganradio.org/post/theres-arsenic-michigans-well-water-not-lot-people-are-talking-about-it <p>Parts of southeast Michigan – especially in the Thumb – have higher than average levels of arsenic in the groundwater.</p><p>Arsenic can cause cancer. It’s been linked to bladder, lung and kidney cancer, and other serious health effects.</p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-e14e77a3-d979-2790-28f6-af073b4e125b">If you’re on city water, there’s a federal regulation that limits the amount of arsenic in it, but if you’re on a private well, it’s up to you to find out whether there’s too much arsenic in your water.</span></p><p> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 12:30:00 +0000 Rebecca Williams 18169 at http://michiganradio.org There's arsenic in Michigan's well water, but not a lot of people are talking about it The polar vortex is over, but the "mosquito vortex" is here http://michiganradio.org/post/polar-vortex-over-mosquito-vortex-here <p></p><p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">We wrestled with the polar vortex all winter long. Now it looks like we could be wrestling with a mosquito vortex all summer long.</span></p><p>Ned Walker is a professor of entomology, microbiology, and molecular genetics at Michigan State University.</p><p>Walker anticipates a bad mosquito season this summer. Right now in lower Michigan, for a variety of ecological factors, we have three varieties of mosquitoes flying around at the same time.</p><p>The first species is the spring mosquito, a consequence of the polar vortex. They live in woodland pools that were formed by melted snow and spring rains.</p><p>“Our mosquitos are cold-hardy; they are used to the northern conditions,” Walker says.</p><p>The second species is the flood plain mosquito, which hatches after heavy rainfall in the spring.</p><p>The third is the summer flood water mosquito. Their larvae live in places that stay wet from a half-inch of rain or more after seven to 10 days.</p><p>Walker says there are about 60 different types of mosquitos in Michigan.&nbsp;</p><p><em>*Listen to full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 01 Jul 2014 21:14:08 +0000 Stateside Staff 18223 at http://michiganradio.org The polar vortex is over, but the "mosquito vortex" is here Michigan’s arsenic problem is among the worst in the nation. Here’s why that matters. http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-s-arsenic-problem-among-worst-nation-here-s-why-matters <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 15px; line-height: 1.1500000000000001; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">If you’re on city water, your drinking water has to comply with a federal regulation that limits the amount of arsenic in it, but if you’re on a private well, the&nbsp;federal and state governments do not limit the amount of arsenic in your well.</span></p> Tue, 01 Jul 2014 12:00:00 +0000 Rebecca Williams 18160 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan’s arsenic problem is among the worst in the nation. Here’s why that matters. Interview: High levels of arsenic could be in your well water http://michiganradio.org/post/interview-high-levels-arsenic-could-be-your-well-water <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Arsenic is a deadly poison, and there are people in Michigan getting arsenic at levels high above federal standards every time they drink the water coming from their taps.</span></p><p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Michigan Radio's "The Environment Report" is presenting a five-part series this week called "Michigan's Silent Poison," in partnership with The Center for Public Integrity and the public radio show&nbsp;"Reveal."</span></p><p>The Environment Report’s Rebecca Williams spoke on Stateside today, along with David Heath from the Center for Public Integrity.</p><p>“No organ system goes untouched by arsenic,” Williams said.</p><p>Extremely high doses of arsenic can kill you. Smaller doses have been linked to lung, bladder, skin, prostate, and liver cancers. You can also get arsenic poisoning with symptoms such as nausea, headaches, gastrointestinal pains, vomiting, and diarrhea.</p><p>Arsenic can be found in rice, apple juice, beer and wine, and drinking water. The levels are exceptionally high in private wells at people's homes, mostly in the thumb region of Michigan.</p><p> Mon, 30 Jun 2014 21:16:49 +0000 Stateside Staff 18204 at http://michiganradio.org Interview: High levels of arsenic could be in your well water Here's how to test and treat your drinking water well for arsenic http://michiganradio.org/post/heres-how-test-and-treat-your-drinking-water-well-arsenic <p>In some parts of the U.S., arsenic in the groundwater is just a natural part of the geology. Michigan is one of several states where elevated levels of arsenic in ground water can be found.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">This map shows the counties where these elevated levels have been found, but experts caution, elevated arsenic levels in well water can be found just about </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">anywhere&nbsp;</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">in Michigan:</span></p><p></p><p>There was a big push to educate people about the dangers of arsenic poisoning around a decade ago, but in some places in Michigan, people still don't know much about it.</p><p>And in some other cases, people know about it, but choose to ignore it, for one reason or another.</p><p> Mon, 30 Jun 2014 13:00:00 +0000 Mark Brush 18099 at http://michiganradio.org Here's how to test and treat your drinking water well for arsenic This mom didn't know why her family was sick until she checked their water http://michiganradio.org/post/mom-didnt-know-why-her-family-was-sick-until-she-checked-their-water <p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;">&nbsp;</p><p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: 15px; line-height: 1.1500000000000001; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">It’s been called “the mother of all poisons.” You can't taste arsenic and you can’t smell it, which is why it’s been the poison of choice for centuries. </span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c59a8473-ce97-5241-60e1-ff5a72d21c6a"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Calibri; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">“During the Middle Ages it was called the succession powder,” says Jerome Nriagu, professor emeritus of public health at the University of Michigan.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c59a8473-ce97-5241-60e1-ff5a72d21c6a"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Calibri; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">“That’s the way people got rid of the kings and queens if they wanted to become the king or queen themselves,” he said.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c59a8473-ce97-5241-60e1-ff5a72d21c6a"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Calibri; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">Arsenic, in very high doses, can kill you.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c59a8473-ce97-5241-60e1-ff5a72d21c6a"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Calibri; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">But arsenic is a naturally occurring element and doctors and scientists like Nriagu are working hard to understand how arsenic affects us today.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><strong>A family experiences mysterious health problems</strong></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c59a8473-ce97-5241-60e1-ff5a72d21c6a"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Calibri; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">Renee Thompson and her family were sick for three years without having any idea why. </span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c59a8473-ce97-5241-60e1-ff5a72d21c6a"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Calibri; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">“My children and my husband all became very ill after we moved into the house we had in Ortonville,” she said.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c59a8473-ce97-5241-60e1-ff5a72d21c6a"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Calibri; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">At the time, Thompson had recently given birth to her third child, Danica.</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c59a8473-ce97-5241-60e1-ff5a72d21c6a"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Calibri; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;">“My son was six, and he started to have severe chest pains, while my older daughter had headaches,” Thompson said. “My husband had GI bleeding, and I had become very fatigued with headaches and skin problems.”</span></span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.1500000000000001;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:10pt;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c59a8473-ce97-5241-60e1-ff5a72d21c6a"><span style="font-size: 15px; font-family: Calibri; font-style: italic; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: transparent;"><em>Listen to Thompson explain what her family experienced:</em></span></span></em></p><p> Mon, 30 Jun 2014 12:55:00 +0000 Rebecca Williams 18124 at http://michiganradio.org This mom didn't know why her family was sick until she checked their water