WUOMFM

News

Fortune 200 company moving to downtown Detroit

Nov 30, 2016
Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan speaks at Adient press conference at Cobo Hall.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

The world's largest global automotive seating supplier announced today it will establish its new headquarters in Detroit.

The Milwaukee-based company Adient chose Detroit to build its new headquarters because of the economic opportunity it sees in the downtown area.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said he's proud that companies want to move to the city.

“To move their global headquarters to Detroit is a message to every major company in America that Detroit is a place that you want to be,” Duggan said.

Self-driving technologies like Tesla's Autopilot mode are limited by the sensors they use to detect obstacles on the road.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

It's a persistent message: Self-driving cars are coming. Yet, before the roads are filled with cars steered entirely by computers, there’s much work to be done — especially when it comes to safety.

A grim reminder of that happened this past May when a man driving a Tesla became the first to die while using autopilot mode. He was watching a DVD when his car plowed into a tractor-trailer that was crossing its path.

That accident sent a message to the engineers who are developing this technology: get it right and make it safe.

L. Brooks Patterson defended James Simpson's invitation, saying Simpson was asked to speak specifically because he's provocative.
screen grab of Oakland Co. video

 


According to its website, the Oakland County Business Roundtable began in 1993 as a space for business leaders to “engage” with county leaders on “issues that will enable them to prosper.”

For next month’s lunch meeting, County Executive L. Brooks Patterson has invited writer James Simpson to be the keynote speaker.

Campaign representatives will look at ballots, but they're not allowed to touch them.
flickr user Michael Dorausch / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

There’s so much at stake in a recount. So much that must be done correctly, and with the Electoral College vote looming, the clock is ticking.

Melvin “Butch” Hollowell knows what that’s like. Currently the corporation counsel for the city of Detroit, he’s worked on many crucial recounts: the Bush-Gore recount in Florida in 2000, the 2005 recount of the Detroit mayoral election between Kwame Kilpatrick and Freman Hendrix, the 2013 recount involving Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan, and more.

"354,000 people signed their name on a petition to vote on this issue. They were ignored. I think that's unconscionable," Jamison said.
flickr user Dank Depot / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 


From an early-morning fixture on Detroit television to an advocate for legalized marijuana in Michigan, Anqunette Jamison has made quite a transition.

The former Fox 2 Detroit anchorwoman walked away from her TV job to become a volunteer for MI Legalize, one of the groups that’s been fighting to put the question of legalization before Michigan voters.

She’s got a very personal stake in the fight for legalization: Jamison uses marijuana to help with her multiple sclerosis.

Voting in Michigan.
Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein has requested a full hand recount of Michigan's presidential vote.

Stein requested the recount on Wednesday. She had already requested recounts in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Republican Donald Trump won all three states. He defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in Michigan by 10,704 votes out of nearly 4.8 million ballots cast. Stein alleges that irregularities and the potential for hacking into scanning devices call into question the results.

The Michigan recount could start as early as Friday.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

The Green Party is expected to file paperwork to formally request a recount of the presidential election votes in Michigan. This Week in Michigan Politics, senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talks with Morning Edition host Doug Tribou about why he's already confident the results are correct.

They also discuss President-elect Donald Trump's choice of Betsy DeVos as his Secretary of Education, Congressman Sander Levin's decision not to seek re-election as leader of the Ways and Means Committee, and the transition of the Detroit Promise scholarship from a two year to a four year program.


Wayne State holds vigil for fallen police officer

Nov 30, 2016
Mourners gather in Gullen Mall, at the center of Wayne State University's campus to pay respects to Officer Collin Rose.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Thousands of people, including students, faculty and law enforcement officers, stood in the center of Wayne State University’s campus last night. Some were holding candles, others were holding back tears.

All of them gathered to pay their respects to fallen Wayne State Police Officer Collin Rose.

Officer Rose was patrolling the area west of the school’s campus last week when he was shot while trying to arrest a man who was known by campus police to be troublesome.

The suspect was caught hours after the incident. Rose died the following day.

The state officially certified Michigan’s election returns two days ago, and though the focus was on the extremely close presidential race, there was something I found even more troubling in another result, one that’s drawn very little notice.

That would be the vote for the state board of education. John Austin, who is now the board’s president, courageously rallied his colleagues to support the rights of transgender students. 


Dr. Larry Nassar.
Michigan Attorney General's office

EAST LANSING, Mich. - Lawyers for 13 women and girls have told Michigan State University that they plan to sue the school over alleged sexual assaults by a doctor who also worked for USA Gymnastics.

A notice was filed Tuesday in the Court of Claims. It's a procedural step under state law.

The letter accuses Dr. Larry Nassar of "digital penetration" without proper notice "under the guise of providing care" at his office at Michigan State, from 1996 to 2015. Attorney Stephen Drew says most were gymnasts from across Michigan.

user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Lawmakers could be making changes to Governor Rick Snyder’s mission to scale back the use of tax incentives to attract jobs and investment. Two packages of bills offering incentives to businesses passed in the Senate Tuesday.

Proponents of the packages say they will spur economic growth by providing incentives like tax abatements and redirecting tax revenues toward economic development projects.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

The estimated cost of recounting all the votes in Michigan’s presidential election continues to rise. State officials plan to charge Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein almost $1 million to conduct the recount. But Secretary of State Ruth Johnson guessed as much as $2 million.  Republican Party attorney Eric Doster thinks it will be closer to the $10 million cost of running a statewide election.

State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Today is the official start of the lame-duck period for Michigan’s 98th Legislature.

Some of us remember the frenetic pace of the lame-duck in 2012, when state lawmakers passed something like 300 bills. That included "right to work" and a new emergency manager law to replace the one voters had just repealed.

Zach Gorchow, editor of Gongwer News Service, joined Stateside to discuss what’s on the to-do list this year during lame duck.

Lomas Brown
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

 

From a band kid growing up in Florida to a fearsome offensive tackle who played 18 seasons in the NFL, including 11 years with the Detroit Lions, Lomas Brown certainly has a story to tell.

He was named to the Pro Bowl for seven straight seasons. And he got a Super Bowl ring with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Brown first came to Michigan when he was drafted by the Lions in 1985. Despite the snow and cold winters, he’s still here in the Detroit area.

His new memoir, co-authored with Mike Isenberg, is titled, If These Walls Could Talk: Detroit Lions: Stories from the Detroit Lions Sideline, Locker Room and Press Box.

For many Flint residents, trips to a nearby water distribution center is a regular part of life.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Two federal courts are weighing legal arguments over requiring the government to deliver bottled water to Flint residents.

A federal judge ordered the state to make weekly home deliveries. The Snyder administration and water activists have filed dueling motions over the judge’s order.    

Attorneys for the state say the order would create an “insurmountable burden.”

39 arrested at Detroit minimum wage protest

Nov 29, 2016
Demonstrators block traffic in Detroit early Tuesday morning.
D15 / McConnell Communications Inc

Detroit police arrested 39 people this morning during a protest outside a McDonald's on Grand River Avenue. 

The protest was part of a national campaign of planned strikes and civil disobedience to fight for a $15 hourly wage and the right to unionize.

According to Commander Elvin Barren of the Detroit Police Department, the protest was peaceful, and about 350 people participated. 

EMU football heads to first bowl game since 1987

Nov 29, 2016
The 2016 EMU Eagle football team.
EMU Football

It's official: Eastern Michigan University's football team is heading to the Popeyes Bahamas Bowl.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons -- http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Donald Trump has selected five people for his cabinet. His most recent choice is Republican Rep. Tom Price, R-GA, as Secretary of Health and Human Services. 

Though Price has served as Georgia's 6th District congressman since 2004, most of his childhood and young adulthood was spent in Michigan. 

Price was born in Lansing, Michigan and graduated from Dearborn High School, according to Congress' Biographical Directory. He also pursued post-secondary education in Michigan.

As you may have heard, Jill Stein, the Green Party presidential candidate, is asking for a recount of the vote in the three key states that decided the election – Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and our own state of Michigan, which was the closest of all.

The Clinton campaign, or whatever remains of it, doesn’t hold out any real hope that the outcome will change, but supports the recounts, on the ground the public ought to be assured of the integrity of the process. 


Courtesy of Doug Darling

On the campaign trail, President-elect Donald Trump said that he would rescind the Waters of the U.S. Rule, which outlines what kinds of water bodies are federally protected.

Environmentalists say the rule is necessary to safeguard our ecosystems and drinking water.

But many in the agriculture industry don’t like the rule—they say it’s an over-reach, and they’re worried it will give the federal government more say over what they can (and can’t) do on their fields.

Recall organizer Alex Harris (right at podium) could not convince a panel of Genesee County officials to approve his petition language against Flint Mayor Karen Weaver (left)
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

An effort to recall Flint’s mayor has been derailed.

It didn’t take long for the Genesee County Board of Electors to dispatch the petition, maybe two minutes.

The extremely short meeting ended after recall organizer Alex Harris admitted he didn’t have evidence of his first claim against Flint Mayor Karen Weaver that she didn’t pay her water bill.

user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Republican Donald Trump is officially the winner of the presidential race in Michigan. A state elections board certified the results today, but now a recount looms.

Jim Harbaugh pleads his case.
MGoBlog / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The University of Michigan was fined by the Big Ten for comments by football coach Jim Harbaugh after Saturday’s game against Ohio State University.

The school was fined $10,000 after Harbaugh criticized the officiating during Saturday's double-overtime loss to the Buckeyes.

The Big Ten Network tweeted a picture of the conference's statement regarding Harbaugh's comments. 

Joshua Johnson
Stephen Voss / NPR

 

After a 37-year run, Diane Rehm is retiring.

She’d served notice to her legions of loyal listeners that she would see out the election and then step away from The Diane Rehm Show.

Much as Garrison Keillor hand-picked his successor Chris Theil for A Prairie Home Companion, Rehm personally selected her own: radio journalist Joshua Johnson.

Johnson sat down with us today to talk about how he plans to follow in Rehm’s shoes and what he plans to do with his new show, 1A.

A peek into the LEGO castle
Courtesy of Play-Place for Autistic Children's Facebook page

The Next Idea

“Inclusion. Acceptance. Support.”

That’s the mission of Play-Place for Autistic Children.

It’s a 25,000 square foot facility in Sterling Heights in Macomb County, and there’s no place like it elsewhere in the country.

Play-Place is a nonprofit that gives kids who are on the autism spectrum a safe, fun, comfortable place to hang out and play with others.

For parents and caregivers, it’s a place to find “me-too” conversations with someone who is also going through the challenges presented by autism.

Fans blew up the internet this weekend with their video and screenshot analysis of whether or not J.T. Barrett of Ohio State got the first down in the second overtime against Michigan. The referees ruled he did.
Twitter: @Bluekts_ @nlwolfe80 @TheGambler100

Aside from Western Michigan beating Toledo to finish the regular season undefeated, and Eastern Michigan clinching their first bowl game in nearly 20 years earlier in the week, it was a pretty rough week for most Michigan college football fans.

John U. Bacon joined Stateside for his weekly sports roundup and it was all about football.

On Thursday, the eyes of the nation were on the Detroit Lions coming back to win in the fourth quarter for the seventh time this season. When the dust settled, the Lions were all alone in first place in the NFC North with a one game lead over the Minnesota Vikings (and Detroit owns the tiebreaker over Minnesota after winning both games this year). 

Two days later, the eyes of the nation were fixed upon "The Game" between Michigan and Ohio State and it lived up to the hype.

MSU opening first medical clinic in Detroit

Nov 28, 2016

Michigan State University is opening its first neighborhood medical clinic on Mack Avenue in Detroit Tuesday.

The Late physician Michael Popoff previously ran the east-side Detroit clinic from 1968 until his death in 2015. Popoff's family agreed to donate his clinic to Michigan State University as long as the university would continue operating and providing care out of the facility.

U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade says federal prosecutions of hate crimes will remain a priority in Michigan - even if she herself is replaced by a new administration.

McQuade is U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan.

She hopes to reassure people who may fear that the government will abandon the prosecution of hate crimes, due the tone of the discourse during the presidential campaign.

wikimedia commons

It's going to take more time and work than originally expected to fix a methane problem at an old Kent County landfill. 

In August, county officials discovered during routine tests that the methane from a landfill next door to the Kentwood City Office Building was migrating outside its perimeter.

Methane is a flammable gas created by the decomposition of organic matter.

Director of Public Works Darwin Baas says the subsequent investigation revealed a surprising amount of methane being produced.

The Packard Plant Project

If you have driven past the derelict Packard Plant in Detroit recently -- that eyesore beloved of Detroit "ruin porn" photographers -- you probably noticed something is different.

Most of the graffiti is gone.

And more improvements for the massive east Detroit property are on the way. Owners say the Packard Plant Project will be the largest historic renovation in North American history - and the third largest globally.

Pages