Christina Shockley

Host - Morning Edition

Christina holds a degree in Mass Communication Studies from the University of Michigan. As a student, she got her start in broadcasting as an intern at Michigan Radio working on The Todd Mundt Show.

After graduation, Christina worked in Minnesota and Wisconsin. She co-produced a daily call-in program on politics for Minnesota Public Radio in addition to serving as an announcer and newscaster. Before her return to Michigan, she also hosted All Things Considered at Milwaukee Public Radio.

In her free time (when she’s not catching up on sleep to recover from those early mornings), she likes to run, bake, and go out with friends in downtown Ann Arbor. For fun, she has run in four marathons, including the Boston Marathon, and, though she has an extensive shoe collection, Christina wears slippers in the studio during Morning Edition.

Q&A

How did you get involved in radio?
I had a make-believe radio show when I was in elementary school. I wrote little stories and conducted "interviews." As I got older, became involved in plays, and was in charge of reading stories aloud to my elementary school class after lunch. So, the spoken word was always a part of my life. My parents also listened to NPR in the morning and evening (I still have a crush on Noah Adams, former co-host of All Things Considered). I started at Michigan Radio as an intern for "The Todd Mundt Show" in 1998, while I was a student at the University of Michigan.

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I catch up on sleep! I also run, bake, and head out to downtown Ann Arbor with friends.

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
Aside from Morning Edition, I love Wait Wait Don't Tell Me. I appreciate the humor! Since I deal with news all week (and let's face it, a lot of news is negative) it's very refreshing to take a look at the lighter side. I also appreciate the interviews they conduct with really smart people on a topic they know nothing about. It shows we all have our own talents.

What do you like best about working in public radio?
I work in public radio because we are listener-supported. This radio is really a group effort; everyone across the community chips in to make it happen. We're not owned by a corporation or industry. I'm honored to work in a profession I admire -- with some really smart, amazing people.

Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
One of my favorite things, I'll admit, is reality TV. I'll record the shows and watch them while I'm on the treadmill.

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
Even native Michiganders don't realize how common it is for high school students in Holland (Michigan) to take part in Dutch Dancing! During Tulip Time, high school kids from the Holland area put on Dutch Costumes and perform in the streets for tourists. (I even remember some of the steps!) The elementary school students also walk in the "Kinderparade" If you're from the area, it's just something you do.

What else would you like people to know about you?
I have an extensive shoe collection(?) but I wear slippers in the studio during Morning Edition!

Pages

Seeking Change
9:23 am
Mon January 9, 2012

Changing America's 'two-party' system

Immortal Poet Flickr

Michigan Radio begins a new program on Morning Edition today. During the new series, Seeking Change, we'll explore the different ways that people are trying to help along change in their communities. This year’s presidential campaign is already taking up hours of air-time. 

Voters are seeing continuous TV ads and the candidates have begun disseminating their messages and campaign promises all over the place. But, Americans Elect wants to change that... at least the length of the campaign “season.” Americans Elect is a non-partisan group that is sick of the two-party system. Supporters would like to create a party by and for the people.

Brian Betts, an Americans Elect delegate, speaks with Michigan Radio's Christina Shockley for the first edition of Seeking Change.

Detroit Auto Show
7:52 am
Mon January 9, 2012

What to watch for at the North American International Auto Show

On the floor of the North American International Auto Show at Cobo Hall in Detroit, 2008.
Corvair Owner Flickr

Media preview days have begun at the North American International Auto Show at Cobo Hall in Detroit. Michigan Radio's auto-beat reporter Tracy Samilton is at the show and spoke with us this morning about what we should look for over the next week.

Politics
9:52 am
Wed January 4, 2012

The Week in State Politics

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Ifmuth Flickr

On this week's The Week in State Politics, Michigan Radio's Political Analyst Jack Lessenberry speaks with Christina Shockley about a possible state budget surplus for the next fiscal year and what a Mitt Romney win in Iowa means for his prospects in the Michigan primary.

Politics
9:13 am
Wed December 21, 2011

The Week in State Politics

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Ifmuth Flickr

In this week's edition of The Week in State Politics we speak with Michigan Radio's Political Analyst Jack Lessenberry about the cap that's been lifted on the amount of charter schools that are allowed in the state, what it means for workers now that a new workers' compensation bill has been signed into law, and we'll take a look at what we should expect from the state legislature in 2012.

Arts/Culture
6:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Home Share program brings different generations under one roof

The Ann Arbor Home Share program at the University of Michigan connects homeowners over the age of 55 with younger people looking for a place to live. 

The program allows senior homeowners to manage household chores and offset costs--but it also offers companionship. 

Every arrangement is unique.

In some cases, younger roommates take on housework or run errands in exchange for lower rent. 

Michigan Radio's Christina Shockley spoke with Carol Tice and Kristina Gifford, who participate in the Home Share program. Tice, 80, rents out part of her home to Gifford, 24. Tice has been a participant for over 7 years.

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Politics
8:35 am
Wed December 14, 2011

One year in office: Governor Snyder looks back at the last 12 months

Governor Rick Snyder
Photo courtesy of the Snyder administration

It’s been almost a year, now, since Governor Rick Snyder took office. In the past 12 months, many long-time political observers have been more than a little surprised at the speed in which the Governor has been able to get his priorities through the legislature. The state has a new business tax and a balanced budget.

But, not everyone is happy with what the Governor has accomplished. The state now has some controversial new laws including new power for emergency managers and a law that taxes some senior citizens’ pensions. Michigan Radio's Christina Shockley spoke with the Governor this morning, on his way to Lansing, about the challenges he's faced this year and what he hopes for in 2012.

What's Working
6:00 am
Mon December 12, 2011

Help for four-legged family members

Cascades Humane Society in Jackson, Mich. offers pet food and supplies to families who are having financial difficulties. The pet food pantry helps families keep their pets and reduces the number of animals in need of new homes.

As part of our What’s Working series, Michigan Radio’s Christina Shockley speaks with Debra Carmody, executive director of Cascades Humane Society, about the pet food pantry program. 

Sixty-two percent of US households have at least one pet. Yearly pet care costs can range from $500 to $800—an expense that might be out of reach for families that are forced to downsize. “When you see people coming to our agency and they have to relinquish their pets, it’s heartbreaking,” Carmody says. 

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Education
6:44 am
Mon December 5, 2011

LGBTQ teens in Ann Arbor lead the anti-bullying movement

Riot Youth is an Ann Arbor-based group that supports and advocates for LGBTQ teens. For those who don't know, that's lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning.

Four years ago the group surveyed students in Ann Arbor schools about bullying and sexual orientation. Using the results of that survey, and drawing on their own experiences, the teens wrote a play about bullying that they perform in schools across the state.   

Michigan Radio's Christina Shockley spoke with Laura Wernick, an advisor with the group, and Leo Thornton, a 10th grade student and Riot Youth board member.

Thornton, who identifies as transgender, said the group has been a life-saver. "I found Riot Youth and I realized there were not just other transgender people—there's a spectrum of other identities within the queer community, and that we all can come together and just be ourselves."

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What's Working
9:59 am
Mon November 28, 2011

Michigan's State Park System

The Michigan State Park System won the gold medal award this year for the top state park system in the nation. People use the parks for swimming and boating during the summer, and hunting and downhill skiing during the winter, among a host of other activities.  We wanted to find out more about how the parks system affects our lives.  So, as part of our series, "What's Working," we called Ron Olson, the Chief of Parks and Recreation.

Politics
7:48 am
Wed November 23, 2011

The Week in State Politics

aflyingpsychofly flickr

Every Wednesday, we speak with Michigan Radio's Political Analyst Jack Lessenberry about the state's political happenings during the week. On tap for this morning: Detroit's financial crisis, a $60 million budget hole facing state lawmakers when they return back to the Capitol next week, and the 'failure' of the so-called Congressional super-committee.

What's Working
12:06 am
Mon November 21, 2011

Volunteers paint Ann Arbor schools

Paint for Kids founder Gene Firn after a painting project at Lawton elementary in Ann Arbor. The ball of tape measures 3 ft in diameter.

Gene Firn is the founder of Paint for Kids, an Ann Arbor-based organization that mobilizes parents and community volunteers to paint schools.

Firn, who teaches a DIY painting class, was looking for practice walls for his students when he learned that the Ann Arbor school system doesn't have a painting department. He thought he could help, so he submitted a proposal.

The concept is simple: an experienced painter supervises parent volunteers as they transform hallways and classrooms over holiday weekends.

Michigan Radio's Christina Shockley spoke with Firn, who said that Paint for Kids fulfills the needs of local schools, but also attempts to create a culture of volunteering.

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Culture of Class
6:52 am
Fri November 18, 2011

The myth of "Upward Mobility"

It's not that easy to climb the class ladder in the U.S.
plastanka Flickr

Upward mobility: the idea that, if you work hard enough, you can climb the class ladder. It's part of the American Dream, right? That you can pull yourself up by your bootstraps, that you can make a better life for yourself, that your children and grandchildren will have a better life than you do.

But, the fact is, upward mobility in the U.S. is just not that easy. And, it doesn't happen nearly as much as many American believe.

As part of our The Culture of Class series, we spoke to Economics Professor Steven Haider, of Michigan State University, about why the myth of upward mobility exists and why Americans, in particular, are so apt to believe in it.

Inform our coverage: Do you believe in upward mobility?

Politics
8:00 am
Wed November 16, 2011

The Week in State Politics

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
aflyingpsychofly Flickr

Every Wednesday we take a look at what's happening this week in state politics with Michigan Radio's Political Analyst Jack Lessenberry. On tap for today: Detroit Mayor Dave Bing is scheduled to address the financial crisis in his city this evening, the state House punts on creating a state-run health care exchange, and Democrats in Lansing release a jobs plan.

What's Working
6:23 am
Tue November 15, 2011

Helping fellow veterans

Many service members face hardships when they return from active duty.  A program at the University of Michigan puts new vets in touch with other veterans to help guide them through the process of returning to everyday life back at home. Brandon Brogan is the program manager of the Buddy-to-Buddy Volunteer Veteran program. As part of our What's Working series, Michigan Radio's Christina Shockley spoke with Brogan.

Culture of Class
7:14 am
Mon November 14, 2011

Why is 'class' so difficult to define?

The "Occupy Wall Street" movement has raised the question: What is class?
getdarwin Flickr

The issue of class has been in the news a lot lately. From the “Occupy Wall Street Movement,” which has snowballed across the country, to accusations of “class warfare” in Washington, D.C.. We’ve also heard recent reports that show the nation’s middle class is shrinking while the top earners’ salaries have skyrocketed.

Today, Michigan Radio begins a new series The Culture of Class. Over the next week and a half, we'll explore the idea of “social class” and how it impacts our lives. But, first, we had to ask: What is class? How do you define it? We put those questions to demographer Kurt Metzger, who runs Data Driven Detroit.

Inform our coverage: What does class mean to you?

What's Working
6:46 am
Mon November 14, 2011

Helping the family and friends of cancer patients

Nearly 1.6 million people in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer this year, according to the National Cancer Institute. Half-a-million people will die of cancer this year. But millions of others are affected by cancer in some way. 

Wives, husbands, children, and friends of cancer patients can also face a crisis when a loved one is diagnosed and treated for cancer. As part of our weekly What's Working series, we spoke with Barb Hiltz, executive director of the Cancer Support Community of greater Ann Arbor. The organization works to help the family and friends of cancer patients.

Sports
7:25 am
Fri November 11, 2011

John U. Bacon: "You can either be a PR man or you can be a journalist... and try to tell the truth"

Anthony Gattine Flickr

Michigan Radio's Sports Commentator John U. Bacon has a new book out. It premiered at number six on The New York Times non-fiction best seller list this week. Bacon was already well-known at the University of Michigan for the book he co-wrote with Bo Schembechler. So, it wasn’t difficult for him to get access to the Wolverine football program in 2008 when the team got a new head coach Rich Rodriguez, or Rich-Rod.

Bacon's plan was to write a story on the spread offense that Rich-Rod had used so successfully at West Virginia. But Bacon quickly found himself in the middle of a new, more complex story.

"It started out being a very simple story... and, now you realize, of course, three years later, the real story is off the field: it's what it's really like to be a player, what it's really like to be a coach, NCAA investigations, pressure, losing, ultimately getting fired... I don't think you have to be much of a football fan to follow this," says Bacon.

Michigan Radio's Christina Shockley spoke with Bacon about his new book, Three and Out: Rich Rodriguez and the Michigan Wolverines in the Crucible of College Football.

Politics
8:32 am
Wed November 9, 2011

The Week in State Politics: Election edition

Michiganders went to the polls yesterday and elected mayors in three large cities, recalled a Republican state lawmaker and voted for a new city charter for Detroit. We spoke this morning with Michigan Radio's Political Analyst Jack Lessenberry about what the election results mean for the state.

Politics
7:54 am
Wed November 2, 2011

The Week in State Politics

State Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Ifmuth Flickr

Every Wednesday we speak with Michigan Radio's Political Analyst Jack Lessenberry about what's going on in state politics. This morning, we take a look at whether improved rail service can lead to a healthier state economy, what to watch for in next Tuesday's election, and the latest happenings in Pontiac, where that city's emergency manager has fired some department heads.

We are having a technical problem with the audio link above. Please use the link below:

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What's Working
6:30 am
Mon October 31, 2011

Aging gracefully with the creative arts

Every week on What’s Working, we take a look at people and organizations that are changing lives in Michigan for the better.

The Luella Hannan Memorial Foundation in Detroit has been around for 75 years. People who work at the foundation describe it as a center for creative aging, an opportunity for seniors to learn new ways to creatively express themselves as they grow older.

Christina Shockely, host of Michigan Radio's Morning Edition, spoke with Rachel Jacobsen, the community development coordinator at the foundation.

Jacobsen said that proactive aging allows seniors "to exercise the more creative parts of their minds and bodies in ways that help them age well and also, hopefully, continue to develop into old age."

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