Christina Shockley

Host - Morning Edition

Christina holds a degree in Mass Communication Studies from the University of Michigan. As a student, she got her start in broadcasting as an intern at Michigan Radio working on The Todd Mundt Show.

After graduation, Christina worked in Minnesota and Wisconsin. She co-produced a daily call-in program on politics for Minnesota Public Radio in addition to serving as an announcer and newscaster. Before her return to Michigan, she also hosted All Things Considered at Milwaukee Public Radio.

In her free time (when she’s not catching up on sleep to recover from those early mornings), she likes to run, bake, and go out with friends in downtown Ann Arbor. For fun, she has run in four marathons, including the Boston Marathon, and, though she has an extensive shoe collection, Christina wears slippers in the studio during Morning Edition.

Q&A

How did you get involved in radio?
I had a make-believe radio show when I was in elementary school. I wrote little stories and conducted "interviews." As I got older, became involved in plays, and was in charge of reading stories aloud to my elementary school class after lunch. So, the spoken word was always a part of my life. My parents also listened to NPR in the morning and evening (I still have a crush on Noah Adams, former co-host of All Things Considered). I started at Michigan Radio as an intern for "The Todd Mundt Show" in 1998, while I was a student at the University of Michigan.

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
I catch up on sleep! I also run, bake, and head out to downtown Ann Arbor with friends.

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio? Why?
Aside from Morning Edition, I love Wait Wait Don't Tell Me. I appreciate the humor! Since I deal with news all week (and let's face it, a lot of news is negative) it's very refreshing to take a look at the lighter side. I also appreciate the interviews they conduct with really smart people on a topic they know nothing about. It shows we all have our own talents.

What do you like best about working in public radio?
I work in public radio because we are listener-supported. This radio is really a group effort; everyone across the community chips in to make it happen. We're not owned by a corporation or industry. I'm honored to work in a profession I admire -- with some really smart, amazing people.

Is there a T.V. show you never miss? If so, which one?
One of my favorite things, I'll admit, is reality TV. I'll record the shows and watch them while I'm on the treadmill.

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
Even native Michiganders don't realize how common it is for high school students in Holland (Michigan) to take part in Dutch Dancing! During Tulip Time, high school kids from the Holland area put on Dutch Costumes and perform in the streets for tourists. (I even remember some of the steps!) The elementary school students also walk in the "Kinderparade" If you're from the area, it's just something you do.

What else would you like people to know about you?
I have an extensive shoe collection(?) but I wear slippers in the studio during Morning Edition!

Ways To Connect

Every week on What’s Working, we take a look at people and organizations that are changing lives in Michigan for the better.

Food Gatherers, a Southeast Michigan food bank, offers a job training program for youth ages 17 to 24.

Some participants are currently managing a mental illness, others have children or are primary caregivers for younger siblings—all are at risk for homelessness.

Christina Shockley, host of Michigan Radio’s Morning Edition, speaks with Mary Schlitt, director of development for Food Gatherers.

Every Monday in our What’s Working series, we talk to people and organizations across the state that are changing lives for the better. This week, we speak with Sue Schooner.

Schooner never liked kids, but she started volunteering with a girls group in Ann Arbor a few years back, and the young women found a way into her life... and they never left. 

So, Schooner quit her job as an auto executive, and is now the executive director for “Girls Group,” a program that mentors and supports high school girls, giving them the opportunities they need to attend college.

“I think part of why the program is so successful is that we provide wraparound programming. So we have discussion groups every single Friday about parent communication, anger management, we have a very intensive college prep program which is basically available seven days a week,” Schooner says.

Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm and her husband, Dan Mulhern, have a new book out titled, "A Governor's Story: A Fight for Jobs and America's Economic Future." Christina Shockley spoke with Granholm and Mulhern about their book last week and it got us thinking:

What can you really learn from a political memoir? Are they filled with honest introspection or just self-congratulatory drivel? To help us answer these questions, we called up Craig Ruff, Senior Policy Analyst with Public Sector Consultants.

Union leaders at General Motors' factories across the U.S. are endorsing a tentative contract with the automaker. 

In an unprecedented press conference yesterday, UAW President Bob King discussed details of the 4-year-contract. The rank-and-file will vote in the coming days. General Motors is the first automaker to reach a deal with the UAW. And,  these negotiations are the first since the federal government stepped in to help GM and Chrysler through bankruptcy in 2009.

We caught up with Tracy Samilton, Michigan Radio's auto reporter, to talk about the tentative contract and what it means for GM, the UAW, and the state's economy.

Jurveston / Flickr

You’ve probably seen news outlets asking for your opinion, or asking you to share your story with them. More and more, media outlets are asking YOU for your personal stories to help them tell the news. Michigan Radio’s Changing Gears project has recently started trying it out with the Public Insight Network. It’s all about using social media to reach out to you. The goal is to tell a more compelling news story because it includes examples and real-life experiences.

To find out more about this trend in information-gathering and whether or not it's a good thing for a news-consumer, we caught up with Cliff Lampe, an assistant professor at the School of Information at the University of Michigan.

screen grab from YouTube video

Imagine being picked up by police for a crime you did not commit. You plead your innocence, but no one believes you.

Now imagine you're convicted and sentenced to prison for that crime.

For our What's Working series, Michigan Radio host Christina Shockley spoke with David Moran, the co-director of the Michigan Innocence Clinic.

The Clinic, at the University of Michigan Law School, aims to overturn the convictions of people who were wrongfully convicted.

It's estimated that 1,500 people currently in Michigan prisons were wrongfully convicted.

You can hear the interview with David Moran above.

And here's a video from the Michigan Innocence Clinic on the case of Dwayne Provience who spent ten years in prison for a crime he did not commit.

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