Jennifer White

Host - All Things Considered

Jennifer White is Michigan Radio's All Things Considered host. Jenn has served as Executive Producer and host of the television program, "Out of the Blue: The Michigan Difference," on the Big Ten Network.

She was also the host of the nationally distributed public radio documentary "Finding Our Bootstraps: Americans Deal With Recession," and has served as Executive Producer and host of the public television programs "Out of the Box" and "Edible Legacies."

Recently, she has moderated several political forums, including gubernatorial and mayoral debates for both public radio and television. A native of Detroit and graduate of the University of Michigan, she has worked at Michigan Public Media since 1999, most recently as the station's Director of Media Outreach and Community Relations. From 2005-2009, she served as Station Manager for Michigan Television, WFUM-TV.

Lansing Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Jennifer White spoke to Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, and Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, about legislative progress towards a roads funding package.

Sikkema says there hasn't been real progress made and Republicans have failed to identify the cuts they would make in the state budget to pay for road improvements. He also says he thinks Republicans need to be willing to make the cuts they identify, rather than leave them for a later legislature to handle.

State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The Wayne County Commission has approved the consent agreement with the state by a 14 to 1 vote. The consent agreement will require the county to make deep cuts in spending and address chronic issues in its jails. 

Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate majority leader and senior policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, joined Jennifer White to look more closely at how that consent agreement might work.

Classroom
User Motown31 / Creative Commons

Each week  Jennifer White speaks to Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, about the latest in state politics.

This week, they discussed the federal civil rights complaint filed by the Detroit Public Schools elected board against Governor Rick Snyder.

Money
User: penywise / MorgueFile

The city of Detroit emerged from the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history last year. Now, Wayne County, where Detroit is located, finds itself facing about a $50 million structural deficit and unfunded pension liability estimated at $850 to $940 million.

Office for Emergency Management. Office of War Information. Domestic Operations Branch. Bureau of Special Services.

Veterans returning home after World War II received a big helping hand from American taxpayers. The GI Bill helped millions get a college education. 

Today, veterans returning home from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan also get help paying for college. The Post 9/11 GI Bill can pay up to around $20,000 a year in taxpayer-funded college tuition.

Potholes are a familiar obstacle on Michigan roads.
Flickr user Michael Gil / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Michigan Senate this week approved a package of bills that would gradually increase the state gas tax over three years and give $1.5 billion to roads funding. But the House and Senate still have to overcome significant differences in their respective plans to fund roads and infrastructure.

Zoe Clark, Michigan Radio’s co-host of It’s Just Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, joined Jenn White to talk about what it will take to finally get a roads funding plan passed.

U.S. Supreme Court
user dbking / flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Michigan and three other states are awaiting a U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding the constitutionality of same-sex marriage bans.

Michigan Radio's Jennifer White spoke to NPR's legal correspondent, Nina Totenberg, about the case and its possible implications for Michigan and the rest of the country. 

Here's their conversation:

Lansing Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder this week signed the $54 billion state budget that pays for schools, universities, prisons, and more. That marks about six months of activity for the newest Michigan Legislature.

Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants, joined Michigan Radio's Jenn White. They talk about where the state is investing money and where it's pulling back.

Budget tiles
Simon Cunningham / Flickr

The state has completed the 2016 budget. Republicans and Democrats celebrated an increase in education funding and early literacy programs.

The Legislature also carved out money for Michigan roads, but not the estimated $2 billion needed annually to fix the state's crumbling infrastructure.

Mackinac Bridge
Julie Falk / Flickr

Kresge Foundation President, Rip Rapson, spoke at the Mackinac Policy Conference this year. He laid out the foundation's plans to invest in Detroit's post-bankruptcy development. Rapson says investments in early education, transportation, and Detroit's small business and entrepreneurial sector are all necessary to create a stable future for the city.

State Capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The Michigan Legislature is entering another round of negotiations to raise money for Michigan’s roads, following a decisive defeat of Proposal 1.

Jennifer White spoke to Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, about the politics of getting a viable roads funding plan passed. 

Here's their conversation:

Michigan roads
user nirbhao / Flickr

Proposal 1 was rejected by voters in yesterday’s special election. That takes Gov. Rick Snyder and the state Legislature back to table to try to come up with a way to fix Michigan’s crumbling roads. What are the political implications of this defeat for Gov. Snyder and for the Republican-led legislature?

Stethoscope
Adrian Clark / Flickr

The issue of police violence against black men has been a central news story in recent weeks and months. Reverend James Dickson says many more black men are dying due to preventable and treatable illnesses. Reverend Dickson is the founder of Fitness Fellowship International, a fitness, health, and wellness initiative for black men. Dickson spoke to Jennifer White about why he started Fitness Fellowship International and how he hopes to help black men live healthier lives.

Here's their conversation:

 

Classroom
User Motown31 / Creative Commons

We’re starting to hear early reports about Governor Snyder’s plan for restructuring public education in Detroit. The school landscape there is very fractured right now, with a combination of traditional public schools, charters, and the Education Achievement Authority.

Congressman Dan Kildee
Photo courtesy of the Office of Congressman Dan Kildee

U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint, is urging his colleagues in U.S. House to pass a resolution calling on the Canadian government and the Obama administration to halt the creation of a nuclear storage waste site. The site would be built about a mile from Lake Huron.

Michigan Radio's Jennifer White spoke to Rep. Kildee about what the proposed site could mean for Michigan and the possible impact of his resolution.

Here's their conversation:


Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr

Indiana has been in the national spotlight this week after passing a Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA). Today, Gov. Rick Snyder said he will veto such a law if it comes to his desk without legislation that adds protections for LGBT people to Michigan's civil rights law.

Chalkboard
user alkruse24 / Flickr

Each week, Jennifer White talks Michigan politics with Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants. 

This week 's conversation focuses on  how education funding is shaping up in Lansing. 

Senator Debbie Stabenow
Photo courtesy of www.stabenow.senate.gov

Michigan U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D) and her co-chair of the Senate Manufacturing Caucus, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R), have introduced new bi-partisan legislation. It aims to strengthen enforcement of trade rules and provide job protection for American workers.

The Trade Enforcement Act would make permanent a federal office that coordinates the efforts of federal agencies that challenge unfair trade practices abroad. It would also create a role to lead that office and another to manage U.S. manufacturing negotiations. Senator Stabenow spoke to Jennifer White about this new legislation.

State Capitol
user aunt owwee / Flickr

The Michigan House yesterday approved legislation that would allow faith-based adoption agencies that receive state money to turn away couples based on religious objections. Today, legislative Democrats introduced bills to overturn Michigan's same-sex marriage ban.

Road in need of repair.
Peter Ito / Flickr

Each Thursday, Ken Sikkema, Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, and Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, discuss Michigan politics with Jenn White. This week the conversation is all about road funding.

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Matthileo / Flickr

The Supreme Court has announced they plan to hear arguments on two issues around same-sex marriage on April 28. Do same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry, and are states required to recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states?

Senator Debbie Stabenow
USDAgov / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow, D-MI, and U.S. Rep. Candice Miller, R-MI, have introduced legislation that addresses the threat of Asian carp entering the Great Lakes.

Michigan Legislature
Matthileo / Flickr

Each Thursday we talk Michigan politics with Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, and Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics.

This week we discuss the state's revenue shortfall and what it means for the budget this year and down the road.

Rosa Parks is widely known as a civil rights icon. Many of us can pull up that image of her sitting on a bus gazing out the window, her eyes fixed on something just beyond our sight.

A new book, Our Auntie Rosa: The Family of Rosa Parks Remembers Her Life and Lessons, shares stories that help us understand the woman beyond the historical figure. It was written by her niece, Sheila McCauley Keys, with Eddie B. Allen, Jr.

Budget tiles
Simon Cunningham / Flickr

Each Thursday, we talk to Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants. Today, we take a look at Governor Snyder's budget priorities and the lingering question of how Michigan will fund its road improvements.

LGBT flag
antiochla.edu / Antioch University

Each Thursday, we discuss Michigan politics with Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants.

Today, we spoke about Governor Snyder's decision not to appeal a judge's ruling that says Michigan must recognize the roughly 320 same sex marriages that occurred in 2014. We also talked about where the state may be headed on LGBT rights.

Here's our conversation:

Rick Snyder wants the U.S., not Canada, to pay for the Ambassador Bridge's customs plaza.
Michigan.gov

Each week I discuss what's happening in Michigan politics with Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former state Senate majority leader and senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants.

This week we talk about the agenda Governor Rick Snyder laid out in his State of the State address, and the likely response from the Legislature.

Michigan's Capitol.
Graham Davis / flickr

The Michigan legislature has begun its new session and that means new leadership in the House and Senate. Republicans have strong majorities in both after the last election.

Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants and Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics joined us to talk about the new leadership.

Dave Agema
Dave Agema / Facebook

This year is starting off with some controversy for Michigan Republicans. Republican National Committeeman, Dave Agema, re-posted an article on his Facebook page that leveled attacks at African-Americans and Muslims.

This is not the first time Agema has courted controversy and there are renewed calls for him to step down.

Michigan Legislature
Matthileo / Flickr

Each Thursday, we talk Michigan politics with Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants.

This week we talked about the bills heading to Gov. Rick Snyder's desk this lame-duck session and whether he'll sign them.

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