Stateside Staff

Today, we discuss how much voice people should have in their neighborhood's development. Plus, we learn what Affordable Care Act premium increases mean for Michigan.

eltpics / Flickr -


While their friends may have been moving back to dorms or apartments to start the new school year, a group of occupational therapy students from Western Michigan University moved their things into their new rooms at the Clark Retirement Community on Keller Lake.

It’s one of the first research projects of its kind in this country: three college students living side by side with senior citizens.

Courtesy of Charlotte vanOyen Witvliet

To many, it seems like these are angry, unhappy times in America, and in our world.

A new book offers an antidote.

The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World brings us wisdom from two of the world’s leading spiritual leaders – Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu and the Dalai Lama.

It chronicles a conversation between the two leaders – sharing their stories and best teachings for creating long-lasting joy and happiness. The book pairs their thoughts with scientific research into happiness.

“Pedal to Porch is a neighborhood bike ride that includes stops along the route where residents of the neighborhood use their front porch as a stage to tell their story,” Cornetta Lane told us.
Courtesy of Pedal to Porch


The Knight Cities Challenge is an opportunity for 26 Knight Foundation Communities across the nation, including Detroit, to answer the question:

What’s your best idea to make cities more successful?

At stake is a share of $5 million in grants.

“It’s really simple. Proposal A says if we have to pay, we should have a say,” Ross told us.
flickr user justgrimes /


How much voice should people have about a development proposed for their neighborhood?

When a developer gets tax breaks or public funding, should the people living around that project get something?

Those questions are at the heart of a pair of a proposals in Detroit.The two competing community benefit ordinances, or CBOs, are on the November ballot.

"It’s not perfect, it does need to be fixed," said Udow-Phillips on the Affordable Care Act. "But it’s a place to start from.”
Flickr user/Images Money /

Word came from the federal government this week: premiums for popular health plans sold on are going up an average of 25% next year.

And, depending on where you live, you may have fewer choices when shopping on the exchange.

Today we learn about Stingray, a surveillance device that gives law enforcement access to phones. And we explore how people talk about mental wellbeing, and the stigma that surrounds it.

Dr. Farha Abbasi told us that healthy diet, sleep and exercise are all key to a healthy mind.
flickr user A Health Blog /


What do we really mean when we talk about mental health and mental illness? We use those terms so often, but do we really understand what we’re talking about?

Freewrite, from Astrohaus
Courtesy of Astrohaus

The Next Idea

If someone asked you to give up your smartphone, your tablet, your laptop, It’s likely you’d have a hard time agreeing to let go.

But as much as we revel in technology and all its bells and whistles, there is a growing awareness that the technology is controlling us.

The tail is wagging the dog.

That thinking has led a couple of Michiganders to come up with something that strips all this technology down to its purest form. No bells, no whistles, no distractions.

According to Stephanie Lacambra, a cell-site simulator like the Stingray can gather data from all phones within a 200 to 500 meter radius.
Public Domain


Federal agents recently revealed that the key to tracking down a low-level accused drug dealer in Wayne County was a device that’s been used in the war on terror.

It’s called Stingray, and it helped police track down and arrest suspected drug dealer Daiven Hollinshed of Inkster.

Courtesy of Michael Ford


The upcoming election will give voters a chance to decide whether or not they’re willing to pay for the future plans of the Regional Transit Authority.

Voters in Wayne, Oakland, Macomb and Washtenaw Counties must approve or reject a $1.2 million-per-year increase on their property tax bills. For a house assessed at $100,000, that works out to $120 a year.

Nawrocki Center is working to help older, recently-single people adjust to life on their own.
Public Domain


Baby boomers are retiring. While many look forward to spending more time with their spouse in their golden years, others face retirement alone.

We were joined today by Sandy Olger, who’s starting that journey, and Lisa Beatty, an attorney with Nawrocki Center.

That firm focuses on seniors. It recently held a seminar on helping women who become single later in life. Whether they are widowed or divorced, they have to adjust to life on their own, socially, financially and otherwise.

Today, we look at the 1971 Attica prison uprising and what we can learn from it today. And, we learn about how 3D printing is changing manufacturing.

In new new book, Heather Ann Thompson looks at the Attica prison uprising of 1971. and what it can tell us about today's prisons.
flickr user Jayu /


The book Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and its Legacy has been getting lots of attention by the national media and is a National Book Award finalist.

The author is University of Michigan Professor of History Heather Ann Thompson.

She joined us today to talk about the 1971 prison uprising in New York and what we can learn from it today.

A tiny octopus printed using the Lulzbot Mini 3D Printer.
flickr user Maurizio Pesce /


We’ve all heard amazing things about 3D printing. The University of Michigan School of Medicine manufactured a replacement part for a patient, manufacturers discover new uses almost every day, and artists are finding innovative ways to use the fairly new technology.

The Grand Rapids Art Museum will soon hold an exhibition showcasing the work of Iris van Herpen, one of the earliest examples of 3D printing technology used in fashion design. Van Herpen has designed cutting edge designs for Beyoncé, Lady Gaga and Bjork.

Today, the state's GOP chairman responds to Trump's stance on election results. And, we hear the performance of a spooky, old-time radio play.

General Motors' Chevy Bolt is expected to be in showrooms by the end of the year.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

With a new development in the march to lead the mobility movement, we check in with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes.

Howes joined Stateside to talk about his latest column "Tough auto game challenges Silicon Valley stars" where he says Silicon Valley has gotten a reality check in terms of what it takes to get a vehicle to market on schedule.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

In the days leading up to last night's third and final presidential debate, a question was put to key members of Donald Trump's team: Would he support the results of the election?

Running mate Mike Pence, daughter Ivanka Trump and campaign manager Kellyanne Conway all said yes, Trump would uphold the results.

That echoed what Trump himself said in the first debate when moderator Lester Holt asked him the same question.

“I’m going to be able to do it,” Trump said. “I don’t believe Hillary will. The answer is if she wins, I will absolutely support her.”

Members of the Roustabout Theatre Troupe joined us in-studio to perform "Worm Food."


One of the most famous radio broadcasts of all time happened on October 30, 1938.

Orson Welles, just 23 years old, and his Mercury Theater Company convinced many Americans that Martians had invaded with their radio adaption of H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds.

It’s a reminder of the power of a radio performance, and it’s something that Joseph Zettelmaier wants to bring to audiences in Michigan.

Zettelmaier’s Roustabout Theatre Troupe is going around Southeast Michigan bringing creepy, spooky, old-time radio plays to audiences so people can see the actors and see how the sound effects are made.

Today, we discuss the 36 recommendations state lawmakers have to ensure Michigan doesn't see a repeat of the Flint water crisis. And, we hear from the author of a new guidebook for parents of children with autism.

Sandison told us that parents should focus on what their child with autism can do rather than what they can't.
Courtesy of Ron Sandison


October is National Bullying Prevention Month. One of the most likely to be on the receiving end of bullying is the child who is on the autism spectrum.

Ron Sandison knows what that’s like.

“Imagine if I said, well, I can’t really pull the trigger of the gun, but here let me find someone who will. I would be criminally charged," Burke said.
Courtesy of Brad Burke

Physicians in Ontario are facing a dilemma: What can you do when asked to perform an action that is legal, but violates your moral code or religious beliefs?

In 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down the federal law that prohibited medically-assisted suicide.

In response to that decision, Parliament passed legislation that cleared the way for doctor-assisted suicide.

In Ontario, the service is now covered by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan, and any drugs required to help a patient die will be available at no cost.

When asked how Midtown Detroit has changed in recent years, Foulkes was to the point: "Less artsy, more money."
Megan M. Canty

The "FOR SALE" sign is out on a building on Cass Avenue in Midtown Detroit. And that sign represents the end of an era.

The building houses the Big Book Store, which is one of the very last independent bookstores left in Metro Detroit.

After 80 years, the store's owner, John King, has decided to close it down. There's just not enough business to justify keeping doors open.

And that means big changes are looming for the store's manager: Bill Foulkes has worked at the Big Book Store since the 1970s.

Courtesy of Chelsea Liddy

Kicking open the door to "the boy's club,” and bringing opportunities to women who want to make their mark on the comic book and gaming world: that's the mission of ComiqueCon.

It’s a comic book convention specifically for women who create comics. And it's happening Oct. 22 in Dearborn at the Arab American National Museum.

Senators Jim Ananich and Jim Stamas speak to the press after the committee released its recommendations.
screengrab / YouTube MLive

Lawmakers have ideas for how to ensure there is not a repeat of the Flint water crisis.

A report released Wednesday by State Sen. Jim Stamas, R-Midland, makes 36 recommendations.

Today, we hear a Jewish millennial explain why she supports Donald Trump for president. And, we speak with the first African-American teacher to be hired by the Lansing School District. 

To find interviews, click here or see below:

Heinz C. Prechter Bipolar Research Program Facebook page

Dr. Perry Baird was a Texas-born and Harvard-trained physician. In the '20s and '30s, his medical career was on the rise. And he became more and more interested in what caused “manic depression,” as it was known at the time.

Today, we know it as bipolar disorder.

After becoming Lansing's first African-American teacher, Dr. Olivia Letts later became the school district's first African-American principal.
Rick Pluta / Michigan Radio

This week, the Michigan Women's Hall of Fame welcomes its latest group of honorees.

One of the five contemporary honorees who will be inducted on Wednesday night is Dr. Olivia Letts. She was the first African-American teacher hired by the Lansing School District. She started that job in 1951 and from there, Letts spent her life as an advocate for education, community service and civil rights.

Courtesy of Lena Epstein

She's Jewish. A woman. A millennial. And she supports Donald Trump for president. That's how Lena Epstein introduced herself in her recent opinion piece for the Washington Examiner.

Epstein is the third-generation owner and general manager of Vesco Oil Corporation in Southfield. She was one of Trump’s earliest supporters and is now co-chair for the Trump campaign in Michigan.

Today, we hear why Donald Trump's message is hitting home in Macomb County. And, a geographer shows us why relying on ZIP codes led the state to mistakenly underestimate the lead in water problem in Flint.