Stateside Staff

Stateside 5.3.2016

16 hours ago

We speak with Eric Lupher about the chance that the Village of Richmond might become the first village in Michigan to disincorporate. And state Rep. Sheldon Neeley, D-Flint, also joins us to talk about whether the state has been doing enough to help Flint.

WMUK

After an Uber driver shot 14-year-old Abbie Kopf and seven others in Kalamazoo in February, the "warrior princess" has made an impressive recovery after nearly being pronounced dead in the hospital. Now she is home trying to adjust to normal life with her family. Her father, Gene, joins Stateside to talk about her recovery and how Abbie is doing.

President Barack Obama
Pete Souza / White House

When President Obama visits Flint on Wednesday, many are wondering if Gov. Snyder will meet with him. Early signs indicated "no," but this morning, Snyder asked to meet with the president and Flint's Mayor Karen Weaver. The It's Just Politics team of Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta tries to make sense of it all.

David Williss / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

State lawmakers are working on a bill that would require schools in Michigan to teach students about genocide, including the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust. Corey Harbaugh is making it his personal mission to ensure that teachers in Michigan have resources and models about Holocaust education and to help them teach it as well.

The NFL's Lombardi Trophy on display
Mobilus In Mobili / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon breaks down how the Detroit Lions did at the NFL Draft, which included the selection of two Michigan Wolverines. Bacon also talks about the NCAA reversing its decision to ban satellite football camps.

Listen to the full interview below.

Stateside 5.2.2016

May 2, 2016

Today, we hear the latest from the struggling Detroit public school system and why teachers are staging a sick-out. We also hear from the father of 14-year-old Abbie Kopf. Kopf is recovering after she and seven others were shot by an Uber driver last Feb.

Stateside 4.29.2016

Apr 29, 2016
  • Gov. Rick Snyder and a recent MLive.com editorial are calling for the state to approve additional funding for the city of Flint.

Stateside 4.28.2016

Apr 28, 2016
  • Daniel Howes joins us to talk about Dan Gilbert's newest plans for downtown Detroit.
     
  • Upper Peninsula Poet Laureate Andrea Scarpino is on a mission to get us to give up our old misconceptions about poetry.
     
  • Poet Laureate of Grand Rapids L.S. Klatt reads his poem, "FORD."

Stateside 4.26.2016

Apr 26, 2016
  • A planned vote on the 180-day signature window on gathering signatures for statewide petition drives came to a sudden end Monday, when State Board of Canvassers Vice-Chair Norm Shinkle abruptly left the meeting.

Stateside 4.25.2016

Apr 25, 2016
  • Two years ago, the city of Flint switched its water source from the Detroit River to the Flint River. This marked the beginning of a water crisis that has received international attention and continues to this day. MLive.com/Flint Journal reporter Ron Fonger was one of the first journalists to cover the story. Fonger reflects back on the last two years and what's ahead for the city of Flint. 
Hotel Walloon
HotelWalloon.com

Childhood summers spent fishing and swimming in a pristine Northern Michigan lake would later inspire Ernest Hemingway's The Last Good Country.

The newly-opened Hotel Walloon is borrowing that reference for the name of an upcoming weekend devoted to celebrating the literary giant's Michigan connection.

For three days, guests will have an opportunity to explore the famed author's boyhood hangout near Petoskey, and hear new details about his Michigan life.

  • Bill McGraw takes a look at Detroit's police department and how its relationship with the public has changed over the decades. 
     
  • Tammy Coxen shares with us a delicious sazerac with a Michigan twist.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

President Barack Obama's trip to Cuba last month was a major milestone in the thawing of relations between Washington and Havana.

It was the first visit to Cuba by a sitting president in over 85 years.

This ongoing thaw has many people wondering what's ahead for the island and its people.

  • Criminal charges related to Flint’s drinking water crisis have been filed against two state water quality experts and a Flint water utility supervisor. Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody reports.
  • Talia Buford is an environmental reporter from Flint, but when her own mother complained about brown water, she passed over the story.

  • Flint Democratic Congressman Dan Kildee is pressing for federal aid for the city as it tries to recover from the water disaster. But has that momentum stalled out on Capitol Hill?
  • Cruise ships have plied the Great Lakes since the 1800s. Starting this summer, the Pearl Mist will stop in Muskegon as she travels between Chicago and Toronto.
  • It’s playoff time for a pair of Michigan sports teams, as the Detroit Red Wings and the Detroit Pistons have kicked off their respective post-seasons. We check-in with Michigan Radio’s sports commentator John U.
  • In 1964, when legislators in Michigan created a state minimum wage, the idea was to create a system where no worker would be paid less than minimum wage. That was true for farm workers, too. Until now
  • A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found where you live can make a difference in how long you live.
  • Gov. Rick Snyder’s appearance at this week’s Pancakes & Politics breakfast was marked by his insistence that his staff and “career civil servants” misled him about the Flint water crisis.
  • A $200,000 question in Lansing City Hall as the city attorney abruptly resigns yet gets a full year's salary and more. Judi Browne Clarke is president of the Lansing City Council.
  • New water tests from Virginia Tech show lead levels are improving in Flint, but the water is still not safe to drink without a filter.
  • Leading off the show is John U. Bacon as he tackles a number of issues in the Michigan sports world.
duncan c / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

What's in a name? How does it affect the course, or even the length of your life?

That question drove Michigan State University economist Lisa D. Cook to dig into three million death certificates in four states from 1802 to 1970.

And that led to some intriguing findings, especially about the names of black men.

  • Michigan’s Schools of Choice program is 20 years old. The Holland Sentinel recently looked at the impacts on local school districts. We speak with Holland Public Schools Superintendent Brian Davis.
  • Nearly one in four Americans are asked to sign a non-compete agreement when taking a new job.
  • Barbara Niess-May, executive director of SafeHouse Center, discusses why so many women don’t talk about their sexual assaults, and the national campaign “Start by Believing” to try to change that.
  • The shooting spree in Kalamazoo was yet another reminder of a thorny problem for news outlets: how do you report the facts without doing it in a way that inspires a copycat?
  • In a typical presidential election year, the state GOP convention would be a pretty cut-and-dried affair. But this is no typical election year.
  • A recent legal case in Cass County, Michigan is raising questions about HIV disclosure laws in Michigan. We talk with Trevor Hoppe, sociologist of sexuality, HIV, and the law at the University at Albany-SUNY about the case.
  • State regulators want to find out where lead water pipes are and how many are left in the ground. Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith has been following the story and the results are posted in this handy map.
  • How a vibrant Flint neighborhood was leveled in the name of "urban renewal”. What can we learn from St. John Street in Flint?
sign that says "Flint Vehicle City"
Michigan Municipal League/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

    

Amid the torrent of headlines about Flint's water calamity, it's far too easy to lose track of the long history of that city.

There are powerful and poignant lessons to be learned in the way rich, vibrant neighborhoods were taken apart and plowed under in the name of "development.”

Communities like the old St. John Street neighborhood.

Charles Winfrey grew up in the St. John Street community. Today he is the executive director of The New McCree Theatre. He joined us today on Stateside

Listen to the full interview below.

  • Traverse City wants to keep its small-town charms while at the same time drawing talent, growing the economy, accommodating population growth and addressing the lack of affordable housing. Traverse City Mayor Jim Carruthers joins us to talk about his city.
  • Writer Desiree Cooper's new book of short stories takes us right into the hearts of mothers, wives and daughters as she explores questions of race and gender.

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