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Stateside
2:30 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

"He Plays A Harp" A West Michigan Mom's story of her son with CP

Credit robertafking.com

Noah's mother, Roberta King, is from West Michigan.

His name was Noah. He was born with cerebral palsy. When he was 17, he lost his battle against infections that had ravaged his lungs.

Noah's mother, Roberta King, is from West Michigan. She has shared the story of her son's life in her new memoir He Plays A Harp.

“It’s a joy to me to bring him to people that never knew him. And I think through that I feel a little less of the loss,” King said.

The story starts with the Noah’s conscious decision to die and then walks through his parent’s journey in dealing with the loss.

“A lot of parents experience the birth of their children. And, gratefully, not a lot experience their death,” King said. “I wanted people to know what that was like to walk your child from one place to another.”

*Listen to full show above. 

Stateside
1:47 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Why were 30 million pounds of tart cherries left to rot on the ground?

Credit Wikimedia Commons

Michigan Radio

Get this, 75% of the nation's tart cherries are grown in Michigan, most of that in the northwest Lower Peninsula.

But every year the industry that brings us cherry pies and the Traverse City Cherry Festival faces restrictions set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Ron French, the Senior Writer for Bridge Magazine, said because so many tart cherries are grown in such a small area, the weather can greatly affect the crop. So the USDA puts a limit on the percentage of Michigan's tart cherry crop that can be sold so prices don't swing too dramatically.

“The result of that is that in some years as much as one half or more in cherries produced in Michigan is left rotting on the ground,” French said.

Most growers favor restrictions, but one food processing company in Elk Rapids is suing the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

French said Elk Rapids is hoping to remove the restrictions on cherries completely.

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Stateside
11:48 am
Tue July 8, 2014

What will get "millennials" into the voting booth?

Credit Theresa Thompson / Flickr

“With our generation and having Twitter and Facebook, we are blasted with a lot of the 24 hour news cycle

The curtain is closing on baby boomers, as the so-called "millennial generation" is taking up a larger share of the electorate. This voting block surpasses seniors who are eligible to vote.

But many millennials are not politically engaged.

“We feel that as one voice, as a younger person, we don’t have a lot of say in politics and I think that also drives their decision to remain out of the discussion as well,” said Connor Walby, a millennial and the campaign manager for State Rep. Frank Foster, R-Petoskey.

Walby also said the negative messages in politics that are seen on social media affect millennials' decision to vote as well.

“With our generation and having Twitter and Facebook, we are blasted with a lot of the 24 hour news cycle. And with that you also get a lot of the negative news coverage,” Walby said.  “I think a lot of our generation is pretty sick and tired of some of the policies that have been put in place and they are just sick of the politicians and the political atmosphere in general.”

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Stateside
4:44 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Stateside for Monday, July 7, 2014

  Today on Stateside:

·         The money for K-12. There's nearly 14-billion dollars. Who's getting what?

·         73 years ago a Congressman from Washington State floated a new idea: build a highway from Alaska to Detroit.

·         Unsettling news in the war on HIV: cases in Washtenaw County hit a 15 year high.

·         Every movement has its landmarks and history. And that certainly holds true for the gay rights movement. Other major American cities have had their LGBT history told, but what of Detroit?

·         There is less interest in the “Up North” cottage market, however cottages are now cheaper than ever.

*Listen to full show above. 

Stateside
4:39 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Michigan's K-12 budget, who gets what?

Credit user: Jimmie / Flickr

Democrats are accusing Governor Snyder of gutting public education, but Governor Snyder says that’s not so. This year’s education budget is a billion dollars more that it was in 2010, the year before he took office.

There is nearly $14 billion in the education budget.

“It’s really a fight over how we want to spend this large sum of money that we are setting aside for schools every year,” said Brian Smith, MLive education reporter.

In the budget, each school district will get a minimum of $50 additional dollars per pupil, while those who have lower funding may receive an extra $175 equity payment.

Critics say this method disproportionately distributes more money to charter and cyber schools.

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Stateside
4:15 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

HIV cases in Washtenaw County hit a 15 year high

Scanning electron micrograph of HIV particles infecting a human H9 T cell, colorized in blue, turquoise, and yellow.
Credit NIAID / Flickr

A total of 33 new HIV cases were reported in Washtenaw County in 2013. That's 37% more than the cases reported in 2012. This is the highest number of cases in the County since 1999. This also reflects a trend happening in Southeast Michigan.

Cathy Wilczynski is a nurse practitioner and program supervisor at Washtenaw County Public Health. She said most of the newly infected are younger.  

“We have ten new cases between the ages of 15 and 24. That is unheard of,” Wilcynski said.

The cases are clustered in the African-American and gay communities. Nearly 80% of the cases in the region involved men who identified themselves as men who have sex with men.

Wilcynzski said one of the reasons for the increase could be that the message that HIV exists is not real to those under 30.

“We need to come up with a new message. We need to figure out what message is going to work,” she said. “I had someone tell me the other day that there is no ownership to that message anymore.”

*Listen to full story above. 

Stateside
12:42 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

"Up North" Cottage prices are at an all time low

Credit user: gwyrah / Flickr

If you are looking to buy a cottage up north, now is the time to buy. With the recession, the burst of the housing bubble, and the loss of pension plans and other savings, there are a lot of cottages on the market today and they are more affordable than ever.

John Carr is the associate broker with Coldwell Banker in Harbor Springs. Carr said buyers will never see prices this low. Houses on Lake Michigan are as low as $179,000 and condos next to ski resorts are going for under $100,000.

“You are never going to see prices this low,” Carr said.

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Stateside
11:38 am
Mon July 7, 2014

"Up North" Cottage interest is low

Credit Emily Fox / Michigan Radio

Owning a cottage up north used to be the ‘Michigan Dream’.  However, with the recession, the burst of the housing bubble, the auto bailout, and the loss of pension plans and other savings, interest in the market is low.

Craig Hinkle, a broker and owner at RE/MAX Grayling, said auto workers used to be one of the biggest cottage buyers, and now many others are not holding on to their second homes. In 2006 values dropped 25-30%. With the market so low, people who want to sell can’t.

“You put up a cute log place on one of these trout streams, you are all proud of it. You get a good price on it, you post it on the internet, you do a mailing, and you get zero responses and it’s just like ‘Oh my goodness, what’s going on here?’” Hinkle said.

John Beck is an associate professor at the School of Human Resources and Labor Relations at Michigan State University. He said a lot of auto workers had cottages because they had disposable income, but now they are not making enough to do so. The younger generation does not have the income, assets, or savings for a second home, or can’t even afford first homes. The interest is also not there. 

*Listen to the interview on Stateside at 3:00 pm. Audio for this story will be posted on Michigan Radio by 4:30 pm.

Stateside
11:14 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, July 3, 2014

Today on Stateside:

  • A new report finds that of the $18 million spent on campaign TV ads over the first half of this year, outside groups kicked in 14 million of that money. We asked who had been working so hard to flood the airwaves, and how it might impact the way you vote.
  • Detroit's bankruptcy settlement has gotten through the State Legislature and the private foundations. Now it's up to 32,000 city employees and retirees. Michigan Radio's Detroit reporter Sarah Cwiek joined us to discuss where the voting is now.
  • Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan has been at the job for six months. Today Detroit News Columnist Daniel Howes reviewed his time in office.
  • Tomorrow is the Fourth of July, but today we brushed up on the history of the Star Spangled Banner.
  • And tomorrow's celebration will also mean lots of traditions, fireworks, parades, and barbeques. More often than not, it’s the men doing the grilling. Stateside’s Renee Gross looked at why men are usually the ones manning the grill.
  • We also spoke with one Detroiter who refused to say nice things about his city. He explained why.

Stateside
10:56 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Duggan’s results in 6 months not going unnoticed

Credit Mike Duggan

There seems to be little doubt that Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is making his mark.

His bulldog nature and savvy political instincts have combined to make Mike Duggan a force to be reckoned with, even as he serves under a state-appointed emergency manager.

Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes reviewed Duggan's progress in his first six months. He said that people should not expect that he change the world in 6 months. What’s important here is the process and the direction.

“The direction is positive and bipartisan, and he’s clearly repaired relationships with city council,” he said.

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Stateside
9:49 am
Fri July 4, 2014

One week until deadline to vote on Detroit's bankruptcy settlement. Where do things stand?

Credit Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

The clock is ticking.

Detroit's bankruptcy settlement has gotten through the State Legislature and the private foundations. Now it's all up to 32,000 city employees and retirees.

They're being asked to say "yes" to having their pensions cut, and promising not to sue the city.

In return, the pension cuts will not be as severe as they would be under what's become known as the Grand Bargain.

Michigan Radio's Detroit reporter Sarah Cwiek joined us on Stateside. She explained the transparency issue surrounding the voting process, what the different classifications of retirees mean, and what we should keep our eyes on, during next week leading up to the July 11th deadline.

*Listen to full interview above.

Stateside
8:30 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Outside groups outspend Michigan candidates on campaign TV ads

Credit User: Keith Ivey / flickr

A new report finds that for every dollar spent by a Michigan candidate in campaign ads, outside groups have spent $3.50.

Looking at it another way: of the $18 million spent on campaign TV ads over the first half of this year, outside groups paid for $14 million of that.

Rich Robinson, executive director of the campaign spending watchdog group Michigan Campaign Finance Network, talked about the consequences of outside money in Michigan political campaigns.

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Stateside
5:20 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

University of Michigan professor uncovers surprising history of "The Star-Spangled Banner"

U of M School of Music, Theater and Dance Professor Scott Piper and pianist Michael Carpenter at Stamps Auditorium, performing "The Star-Spangled Banner."
Credit Courtesy of Mark Clague

It’s one of the most stirring and glorious melodies ever sung – and it can be one of the easiest tunes to sing badly.

But did you know that our national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” started out as an English club song? And it has officially been the national anthem for less than a century?

Mark Clague is a musicologist with the University of Michigan. He’s been working on a project, “Poets and Patriots: A Tuneful History of ‘The Star-Spangled Banner.’” 

Today, he shared some of that history with us.

* Listen to the full interview above. 

This segment originally aired on February 12, 2014.

Stateside
1:07 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Why this Detroit-area man refuses to say nice things about his city

One of the photos archived on Dickson's blog. This graffiti, in Dickson's word, "does a pretty solid job depicting the city’s main roads."
Credit James David Dickson / Down I-94: a blog about Detroit

"Say Nice Things About Detroit."

That cheery slogan was first launched in the '70s by Emily Gail. She had a shop in downtown Detroit when it was the murder capital of the country, and she grabbed a lot of attention with that slogan.

Now it’s been revived, as Detroit has been under the spotlight of bankruptcy and the "Grand Bargain."

James David Dickson, a commentary editor at the Detroit News, believes the chirpy slogan isn't helping anyone in Detroit or the city itself. His opinion piece "Why I refused to say nice things about Detroit" was on the Detroit News blog.

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Stateside
5:20 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

The Civil Rights Act, 50 years later

Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act
Credit Wikimedia Commons

“Let us close the springs of racial poison. Let us pray for wise and understanding hearts. Let us lay aside irrelevant differences and make our nation whole.” – Lyndon B. Johnson

Today is the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The act outlawed discrimination against African Americans and women.

Leslee Fritz, deputy director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights, joined Stateside to reflect on this moment in history and its connections to Michigan.

“It really is the foundational act of so much of the law that we rely on today,” Fritz said.

Fritz said John F. Kennedy really began the process, and Johnson saw it through. The Civil Rights Act led to the Voting Rights Act the following year, as well as the Fair Housing Act, and the Americans with Disability Act.

When the act became law, it was right in the middle of Freedom Summer, the effort to register black voters in Mississippi. Fritz said that the University of Michigan provided the largest number of volunteers for that effort.

Fritz added that Michigan has a proud history of being very progressive. There are a number of people who played key roles, both in the activist effort as well in the legal efforts to get the Civil Rights Act passed. Michigan voters in 1963 approved a new state constitution that set up the first civil rights commission in American history.

“We should be proud of that legacy and frankly, we should be doing a better job today of living up to it,” Fritz said. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

- Bre'Anna Tinsley, Michigan Radio Newsroom. 

Stateside
5:08 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Forget the Bahamas. Michigan is one of the best places to SCUBA dive

Credit Sonja Stark / Flickr

When it comes to great places to SCUBA dive, lots of people immediately think of the waters of the Caribbean or Mexico, with lots of amazing underwater life, beautiful coral, gentle warm water.

But there’s a hardy group of SCUBA divers who point to Michigan as one of the best places to dive.

In the Caribbean, you’re looking at coral and fish. But lakes have great shipwrecks that are over 150 years old.

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Stateside
5:02 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Stateside
4:33 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

A look at the history of the KKK in Michigan

KKK Picnic July 4, Baraga State Park, Michigan. Dated on back, 1923.
Credit user: Wystan / Flickr

The 90th anniversary of a Ku Klux Klan rally in Jackson, Michigan is approaching.

On July 4, 1924, 100,000 KKK members marched in a two-mile-long procession.

Joellen Vinyard, a professor of history at Eastern Michigan University, joined Stateside to talk about the history of the Klan in Michigan.

Vinyard said Michigan was fertile ground for Klan recruiters in the early 20th century. As the auto industry grew, white and black southerners traveled north for jobs. Immigrants also came into the state looking for jobs, and most of them were Catholic.

“The Klan in Michigan was as anti-Catholic as it was anti-black,” Vinyard said.

Vinyard said the Klan’s stated aim was to “keep America safe for Americans,” and its members viewed Catholics as a threat to democracy and the Protestant way of life they believed American was based on.

She added that Klan members were not ashamed to be affiliated with the group. Many marched without their hoods. Coca-Cola even openly sponsored one of their rallies.

However, as the country moved into the Great Depression, the Klan began to lose popularity. Scandals were unveiled, funding was being mismanaged, and people began to feel betrayed by some of their own.

Vinyard says we need to study the history of the Klan and understand who they were. 

“The Klan in Michigan in the '20s, it was a grassroots movement. It’s a reflection of democracy in action,” she said. 

*Listen to the full story above. 

–Bre'Anna Tinsley, Michigan Radio Newsroom.

Stateside
4:32 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Road-funding trouble in D.C. could be bad for Michigan

Credit Wikimedia Commons

There was much anger and disappointment last month when state lawmakers failed to figure out a way to fund badly needed road repairs before leaving for their summer break.

And now there's road funding trouble ahead in Washington, D.C. Federal gas taxes go into the Federal Highway Trust Fund. The money is handed out to states in the form of road construction payments.

Michigan gets more than $1 billion a year from the trust fund. But that could come to a screeching halt before the summer is out.

Mlive's Jonathon Oosting wrote that the fund is running low due to declining fuel tax revenue, and could be fully depleted by late August or September.

“The federal government is already making plans to scale back payments to states such as Michigan, if Congress doesn’t figure out a way to replenish this fund,” Oosting said.

The fund is not collecting as much money as it used to from gas taxes, as people are driving more fuel-efficient vehicles, or opting out of driving in favor of public transportation.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
12:01 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Where do auto museums flourish? Surprisingly, not in Michigan

All F1 Car story in Automobiles Museum of Turin
Credit Wikimedia Commons

There are many different auto museums – some dedicated to displaying cars with unique engineering and designs, and others dedicated to displaying the automobile’s impact on society.

Michigan's auto museums have had little success. Flint’s "Autoworld" theme park closed two years after opening, and the Walter P. Chrysler Museum closed its doors recently.

Europe has had a different experience.

Autostadt, which means “auto city” in German, is in Wolfsburg, Germany. It averages about two million visitors per year. BMW and Porsche also have notable museums in Germany.

Why do auto museums in Europe succeed, while those in the auto capital of the world have not?

“Europeans seem to have such a deep bond with their vehicles,” says Paul Eisenstein, publisher of  The Detroit Bureau. “They are seemingly more interested in the mechanicals and what have you. They have a tendency to be drawn to automotive exhibits, museums, parks, and everything at a much greater rate than Americans are.”

*Listen to our interview with Eisenstein at 3 p.m. today. We'll post the audio for that interview here around 4:30 p.m. 

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