Stateside Staff

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Over 1,500 politicians, philanthropists, entrepreneurs and business people are at the Grand Hotel for this year's Mackinac Policy Conference. There will be three days of events and speakers, including Gov. Rick Snyder and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan.

 

Our It’s Just Politics team, Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta, describes the event as a "melting pot" of Michigan leaders.

Stateside 6.1.2016

Jun 1, 2016

Today on Stateside, we discuss how sometimes doing right by your kids means flipping conventional wisdom on its head.

Decaying sea walls on Lake Michigan in Chicago.
Flickr user Mike Boehmer/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Water levels in Lake Michigan and Lake Huron were at record lows three years ago. At the same time, water levels for the other Great Lakes were well below average.

This year is a bit different. Lake Michigan could be at a near-record high. The lake has risen four feet since that all-time low in January 2013.

Kathleen Torrenson is the president of Torreson Marine in Muskegon. She joined us today on Stateside to discuss how the changing water levels have affected her business and others located along the shoreline.

Torreson said these new high water levels are good for the boating business in the Great Lakes.

“It allows our customers and the people using the water a lot more flexibility in where they’re going and what they’re using,” she said.

But it’s not all good news.

“On the other side of the coin, high water tends to be really, really tough on fixed objects, like sea walls and fixed docks and things like that, things that were built when water levels were at other depths,” Torrenson said. “And as the water comes up and up, they become more prone to damage and erosion, kind of like what they’ve been seeing along the beaches.”

Torrenson said another effect of the sea level rise is that there’s “a lot less beach” compared to a couple years ago. Another flip side, however, is businesses like hers have had to do far less dredging to keep the lake deep enough for boats coming in near the shore.

Stateside 5.31.2016

May 31, 2016

Today, the Stateside test kitchen tried its hand at morel mushrooms. And, we learned about a plan to fix metro Detroit's public transit system.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

a golf ball and club
flickr user Krzysztof Urbanowicz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Market forces have decided that Michigan has too many golf courses.

An article in the Detroit Free Press last month looked at the boom of golf courses in recent decades turning into "a painful bust," as the headline reads.  

Jeff Manion speaking about his first book, "The Land Between," at the Willow Leitungskongress 2012
flickr user Willow Creek DC/H / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

We all fail sometimes. No exceptions.

It's often hard to admit, but failure is an essential part of the human experience. 

That's what Failure:Lab is all about.

Asian Carp
Kate Gardiner / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

For nearly two decades, The Environment Report and its predecessor The Great Lakes Radio Consortium have been reporting about invasive species on Michigan Radio. More and more kinds of pests are being introduced into the lakes, often by cargo ships bringing in critters from foreign ports. And it's a lot more than just Asian Carp, which has received plenty of headlines in recent years. 

Stateside 5.27.2016

May 27, 2016

Today, we talk to a couple of Detroit Reacts activists at the Venice Biennale. Also, leaded water may be bad for you, but not so much for your garden.

Stateside 5.26.2016

May 26, 2016

 

On Stateside today, we eat crickets and learn why edible insects could become a staple food source in the future. 

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

FLICKR USER JASON MRACHINA / https://flic.kr/p/bUmnTg

David Maraniss’ earliest memories are in Detroit. He's the associate editor of the Washington Post. Maraniss lived in Detroit until he was six years old and remembers the strong taste of Vernor's. He remembers the Boblo boat.

His book Once in a Great City: A Detroit Story tells us what Detroit gave America. It also details the first signs of the city's troubles. Maraniss joined us on Stateside to talk about his strong feelings for the state and about the country’s view of Detroit.  

FLICKR USER CHRISTIAN JUNKER/ FLICKR / https://flic.kr/p/9S6x3L

The Detroit Metropolitan Airport has come a long way. The airport used to be less put together, but in 2002 it took off. Delta opened the McNamara Terminal that year. Then, in 2008, the North Terminal opened.

A 2014 study by the University of Michigan Dearborn found that DTW generated $10.2 billion in economic impact and 86,000 statewide jobs.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes joined us today on Stateside to talk about the airport and its impact. He recently had a sit-down conversation with Delta CEO Ed Bastian.

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette.
Bill Schuette / Facebook.com

The U.S. Justice Department, Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette and Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton have asked Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration to shut down its internal investigations into the Flint water crisis.

They say those internal administrative investigations may have damaged their criminal investigations. 

Flickr user Andrew McFarlane/Flickr

Steven Ford joined us today to discuss his father, the 38th President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford.

On Friday, the film A Test of Character airs on National Geographic at 9 p.m. Eastern. It tells the story of President Ford and the challenging time in history during which he took office.

Flickr user LadyDragonflyCC - >;</Flickr

A group of communities in Detroit is working together to address climate change. The Detroit Climate Action Collaborative, a combination of people from private and public industries, has developed a Detroit Climate Action plan, which aims to make a cleaner, healthier Detroit while creating jobs and lowering costs.

Kimberly Hill Knott, project director for the Detroit Climate Action Collaborative, joined us today on Stateside. 

She said without action, and as the climate becomes more volatile, Detroit could see more events like the flood that hit the city in 2014. 

And action on climate change, Knott said, could prevent more than natural disasters.

Stateside 5.25.2016

May 25, 2016

Today, we learn that Gibson has not acknowledged the women who built guitars during World War II. And, we hear about the Beatles' Magical History Tour exhibit.

The Henry Ford

The Beatles have come to The Henry Ford Museum.

The Magical History Tour, a 10,000-square-foot exhibit that explores the full history of the iconic rock band is coming to Dearborn. The exhibit takes fans through the band's early days in Liverpool through its break-up in the 1970s and the solo careers that followed. 

While there are millions of fans of the band in the Great Lakes State, the number of significant connections to Michigan is relatively minimal (Paul McCartney has a Detroit Red Wings sticker on his guitar!). So why was Michigan chosen as the first stop on this tour? 

morgueFile user kconnors / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Big changes are coming to students in Albion.  Voters have approved Marshall Public Schools' annexing of the struggling Albion School District. 

flickr user Heath Alseike / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

How high is too high to drive in Michigan?

With more and more physicians prescribing medical marijuana for chronic pain and other conditions, it's a question that needs to be answered.

Stateside 5.24.2016

May 24, 2016

Today, we learn about the latest move to determine a legal THC limit for Michigan drivers. And, we talk to a Russian rocker who's inspired by Detroit.

Stateside 5.23.2016

May 23, 2016

Today we look at how fast food has changed our food landscape, and John U. Bacon explains how "nuts" the state of college sports recruiting has become.

Flickr user Mike Fritcher / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Throughout its 314-year history, Detroit has been one of the nation’s most historically significant cities.

 

There's enough history that Detroit author Bill Loomis found a significant event for each day of the calendar year throughout the city’s history in his new book, On This Day in Detroit History.

 

From sports heroes, to the Beatles, to Harry Houdini -- the book covers everything Detroit.

Listen to the interview below to learn about some of the strange and spectacular events from Detroit’s history.

 

 


Flickr user gmanviz/Flickr / https://flic.kr/p/r6cN6r

Andrew Hoffman’s grandmother was born in 1895 and died in 1990. In her lifetime, she saw the adoption of indoor plumbing, indoor electrification, airplane travel and computers. Children of today will also see change their lifetime. The main changes, Hoffman believes, will be in electricity and mobility.

 

Hoffman is a professor at the Ross School of Business and Education Director at the Graham Sustainability Institute at the University of Michigan. He wrote an essay for The Conversation entitled “How driverless vehicles will redefine mobility and change car culture.”

He joined us on Stateside to discuss what may happen in the near future, as self-driving vehicles make their mark on culture.

 


John U. Bacon
John U. Bacon

Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon joined us today to talk about college sports recruiting. Specifically, the wooing and courting that happens when a college or university-level coach has his or her eye on a "hot prospect."

The Michigan House of Representatives in Lansing
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The future is cloudy for groups fighting to get those marijuana and anti-fracking proposals on the November ballot in Michigan.

The House last week gave final approval to Senate Bill 776, which sets a strict 180-day window for groups to collect signatures on ballot initiatives and constitutional amendment petitions. 

Stateside 5.20.2016

May 20, 2016

Today, we speak with a Detroit sophomore who’s fed up with the lack of solutions for DPS. And, we look at Founders Brewing’s latest move to expand.

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Matthileo / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Detroit News reported yesterday that Michigan corporations will receive tax refunds that exceed corporate tax payments to the state. In other words, there will be a net loss. Corporations will get back more than they pay.

Two things are happening here. First, tax credits have increased as chiefly the auto companies are cashing in on those incentives. Secondly, tax revenues are down.

Rich Studley, the CEO of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, joins Stateside to explain how this happened. 

sherlock holmes character in silhouette
dynamosquito / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Many around the world will be celebrating the birthday of Sherlock Holmes creator Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle on Sunday, May 22. However, as we learned from University of Michigan medical historian and PBS Newshour contributor Dr. Howard Markel, there's another reason to celebrate.

Doyle was working on his first Sherlock Holmes book while practicing as a doctor and also writing for the London-based monthly journal, Review of Reviews. Doyle used his deductive reasoning to play a role in the discovery of a cure for tuberculosis.

Courtesy of Imani Harris

The future of the Detroit Public Schools as a functioning district is in doubt. The state Legislature is haggling over whether to give it a fighting chance or shortchange it – and allow uncertified teachers.

That has legislators, the governor, some business leaders and teachers very concerned. But they aren’t the only ones.

Imani Harris, a sophomore at Renaissance High in Detroit, voiced her thoughts on what’s happening to DPS in a letter. She joined us today on Stateside.

Stateside 5.19.2016

May 19, 2016

On Stateside today, we talk to a retiring performing arts teacher from Detroit Public Schools about why she chose teaching over her dreams of being an actor.

According to Joshua Akers, nearly 20% of all land parcels in Detroit are owned by speculators
flickr user Berndt Rostad / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Speculators have remained a consistent part of Detroit's bankruptcy and post-bankruptcy stories.

They own nearly 20 percent of all land parcels in Detroit.

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