Report: Detroit's elected leaders need policies for future "non-official" interactions with police

Jun 19, 2014

Detroit’s elected leaders are being advised to come up with a policy for how to deal with “non-official” interactions with city police officers, after a stop involving a Detroit city councilman.

Last January, Detroit city councilman George Cushingberry's was stopped by a city police officer.

The City of Detroit Office of Inspector General says there is ‘Insufficient evidence” that Councilman George Cushingberry abused his position during a January traffic stop.
The City of Detroit Office of Inspector General says there is ‘Insufficient evidence” that Councilman George Cushingberry abused his position during a January traffic stop.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There was marijuana and an empty alcohol bottle in the car. A passenger in the car was a medical marijuana patient and Cushingberry was not given a sobriety test.

Cushingberry entered a guilty plea in March to driving above the speed limit.

There were suggestions that Cushingberry may have tried using his city position to get out of ticket.

The City of Detroit Office of Inspector General says there is ‘Insufficient evidence” that Cushingberry abused his position during the traffic stop.

Still the Inspector General suggests the council and mayor’s office write up policies for future “interactions” with Detroit police officers.

The office also suggests the police department come up with a policy to avoid the appearance of “favoritism” in the future.