Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

The Wolverines taking the field in 2009. They enter this season with 90-to-1 odds at the championship, but fans hope Harbaugh can turn them around.
flickr use Anthony Gattine /

The wait is over: College football begins this week.

The University of Michigan kicks off the Jim Harbaugh era at Utah tomorrow night, and Michigan State will play Western Michigan at Kalamazoo Friday night. lists Michigan State at 20-to-1 odds to win the college football title, putting the Spartans at seventh in the rankings.

“It sounds like a long shot, but if you’re seventh, that’s not bad,” says Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon.

Businesses in Hamtramck, Michigan
Ian Freimuth / creative commons

This weekend brings the 36th annual Hamtramck Labor Day Festival with its food, parade, concerts, carnival and more. All of which is a testament to a tough city that’s refused to be driven to its knees by hard times; a city that’s been made even stronger by its diversity.

Hamtramck Mayor Karen Majewski and City Clerk August Gitschlag joined Stateside to talk about the beginning days of the festival and how, through tough economic times, the celebration continues.

Today on Stateside:

  • A special legislative committee held the first of several hearings for Representatives Todd Courser and Cindy Gamrat, who have been accused of misusing public resources to hide an extramarital affair. Chad Livengood gives us an update.
  • Amid the talk about executive compensation, the DIA is facing some stiff competition in its search to replace former director Graham Bell. Sherri Welch looked into the search for Crain's Detroit Business.
  • The Upper Harbor Ore Dock is one of the most striking features of the waterfront in Marquette. Maritime historian Fred Stonehouse reminds us of the city's history and heritage in mining.
  • The Go Rounds' new album, "dont go not changin," is out today. The Kalamazoo band's leader, Graham Parsons, joins us to talk about the album and his involvement in the local music scene.
  • Treating patients from a distance could revolutionize medical care. Telemedicine is on the rise in Michigan, and Nancy Derringer and Dr. Jed Magen sit down with us to talk about what that means for modern medicine.
  • Glamping is coming to Northern Michigan with a new "glampground" opening next spring northeast of Traverse City. Brad Carlson talks with us today about the work he and his wife have been doing to get it all ready.
Bella Solviva /

A new way to enjoy the great outdoors is coming soon to northern Michigan. 

It's called Bella Solviva. And it’s opening next spring near Torch Lake, northeast of Traverse City.

Bella Solviva is the campground for those who want that outdoor experience without, say, the communal showers or having to plop your sleeping bag on a blow-up air mattress. 

Brad Carlson and his wife are getting this all ready. 

The Detroit Institute of Arts
flickr user Quick fix /

The Detroit Institute of Arts made fresh headlines late last month with the announcement that its three top executives, including newly retired director Graham Beal, are in line for bonuses and pay hikes topping $600,000.

Dr. Juan Manuel Romero engaging in a consultation with a patient 400 miles away
flickr user Intel Free Press /

Telemedicine is the practice of treating patients remotely through telecommunication and information technology.

It’s on the rise in Michigan, especially in rural areas where they don’t have enough doctors, physician assistants, or nurses.

Don Harrison/flickr /

  One of the most striking features of the waterfront in Marquette is the Upper Harbor ore dock. Built in 1912, the pocket dock is still in use today.

Maritime historian Frederick Stonehouse says the city of Marquette began because of the discovery of iron ore back in 1844 in the Ishpeming and Negaunee area, about 20 miles west of Marquette. The city developed as the shipping port for the delivery of iron ore.

The Go Rounds

The Go Rounds have a new album out today. It’s called, “dont go not changin.” The album features layered vocals, a strong rhythm section, stylish guitar riffs and some recorded natural sound (think rain, birds, a crowd at a bar.)

Today on Stateside:

  • After more than two weeks, an internal state House report is out with the results of an investigation looking into allegations of misconduct by state Reps. Todd Courser and Cindy Gamrat. Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta sit down with us to talk about the findings from the report.
  • For years now, when state leaders talk about school funding changes, it’s almost inevitable that someone will say, “What about the money from the Lottery? Isn’t that supposed to fund the schools?” MLive’s Kyle Feldscher breaks down the question.
  • What does it mean to be “civically engaged?” The answer you give can be very different depending upon your age. Chelsea Martin talks with us today about how volunteering can be a right of passage.
  • A century or two ago, feral dogs roamed the streets of Detroit, people lived in fear of rabies, and the dog catcher prowled the streets scooping up strays. Historian Bill Loomis tells us about “The History of Dogs in Detroit.”
  • Dr. Mark Schlissel joins us today to talk about financial aid, sexual misconduct, diversity, athletics culture, and his first year as the University of Michigan’s president.
Flickr user audreyjm529 /

If you count yourself among those who cannot imagine life without your faithful dog by your side, you would have been a pretty rare breed a century or two ago.

That’s when packs of feral dogs were roaming the streets of Detroit.

People lived in fear of rabies, and the dog catcher prowled the streets scooping up the many strays.

Bill Loomis has tracked the history of dogs in Detroit for The Detroit News.

Mark Schlissel
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

This week marks the one year anniversary since Dr. Mark Schlissel became the University of Michigan’s 14th president.

He took over the job in a somewhat tumultuous time: complaints over high tuition costs, the university’s handling of sexual assaults, and an athletic department under heavy scrutiny.

Former Michigan Representatives Todd Courser and Cindy Gamrat.
From Courser/Gamrat websites

A House Business Office investigation into Michigan Reps. Todd Courser, R-Lapeer, and Cindy Gamrat, R-Plainwell, alleges numerous instances of deceptive and "outright dishonest" conduct to cover up their extra-marital affair.

Courtesy of Michigan Nonprofit Association

The Next Idea

In Michigan and across the country, our society is suffering from a lack of civic engagement. Many people do not have strong connections to their communities. In addition, we have vast unmet needs in our cities, our neighborhoods, and our other social infrastructure. Government has limited resources, and communities are suffering. But there is a generation of young people like me who want the opportunity to make a difference in our country by helping communities address their most difficult social challenges.

A button promoting marijuana legalization.
Danny Birchall / Flickr -

Everything you ever wanted to know about marijuana in Michigan was discussed this week on Stateside.

From the politics - to the business - to the potential downsides.

We sat down with reporters, business owners, and law enforcement to learn more about the topic.

Here's a quick rundown of what we covered:

Today on Stateside:

flickr user bobdoran /

We’ve reviewed the movements pushing for marijuana legalization in Michigan, we’ve taken a look at how legal pot has treated Colorado, and we’ve heard the viewpoint of a medical marijuana caregiver in Ann Arbor.

Today, we get the law enforcement perspective.

Donald Trump speaks at the 2015 CPAC in Maryland
flickr user Gage Skidmore /

It's no secret that voters here in Michigan and across the country are angry and cynical about the notorious gridlock in Washington that has brought the country to its knees with budget showdowns.

It doesn't help that Michigan lawmakers have returned to their summer vacations without a deal to repair our decaying roads.

But as Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes points out, the state House found time to devote to a sex scandal.

The Wolverine football program, with its famed winged helmet, has taken some lumps over the years.

This time a year ago, there was no scarcity of news coverage of the troubled University of Michigan football program, leading to the firing of athletic director Dave Brandon and coach Brady Hoke, and the eventual hiring of Jim Harbaugh as the new Wolverine coach.

Flickr/Penn State /

The Next Idea

In his recent op-ed piece in the Financial Times, “Europe is a continent that has run out of ideas,” Economics Nobel Laureate Edmund Phelps hangs the near collapse of the world’s second largest economy on a failure of the collective culture to produce real innovators.

Emojipedia /

The recent announcement that new emojis are coming to a keyboard near you in 2016 caught our attention. The emoji powers that be (and yes, that exists!) are now deciding which new ones will make it onto our keyboards next year.

Today on Stateside:

Boblo boat the SS Ste. Claire
flickr user PunkToad /

For 81 years, the majestic steamers the SS Columbia and the SS Ste. Claire took generations of Michiganders up and down the Detroit River to Boblo Island.

The hour-long river cruise to the amusement park was pure magic.

flickr user Dank Depot /

More than 50% of Michigan voters say in recent polls that they support marijuana legalization.

Two groups hope to put legalization proposals on the November 2016 ballot.

Benjamin Foote

The band members of The Crane Wives quit their day jobs this year and are making the jump from being a West Michigan band, to trying to make their mark on the national music scene. Their new album, Coyote Stories, is being released August 29.

flickr user Thomas Hawk /

Almost six years ago, Michigan’s only women’s prison settled a huge lawsuit after officers raped multiple female inmates.

Changes have been made since then, but are they enough?

In 2011, the federal government opened the door to online lotteries when it lifted its ban on non-sports gambling. 

That action sent the Michigan Lottery down the cyber-path to online lottery games. With some 160,000 registered online players, it's still a small part of the state's lottery business.

But it's set up a big showdown with the Gun Lake Tribe, a showdown that's already blown a $7 million hole in the budget of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.

Today on Stateside:

flickr user Eljoja /

When it comes to the issue of marijuana – to legalize or not to legalize – Michigan seems to be about where Colorado was not too long ago.

Colorado had over a decade to experiment with medical marijuana before legalizing its recreational use in November 2012, which Colorado Public Radio’s Ben Markus tells us gave the state ample opportunity to figure out how marijuana can fit into the political and business landscape.

“Medical marijuana was huge. The state then decided, hey, we need to regulate this thing,” he says.

Osrin/flickr /


It has been a wild ride on Wall Street this week and it's only Tuesday.

On Monday, the Dow plummeted more than 1,000 points before closing the day down 3.6%.

Today, investors were in a buying mood and the Dow went up. 

user Bjoertvedt /

Can Democrats flip three Michigan districts in the 2016 election?

Nancy Kaffer tackled that question in her recent column for the Detroit Free Press.

In her column, Kaffer looked at the 1st, 7th, and 8th Congressional districts in Michigan. Voters in each of those districts elected Republicans in the last election, “by pretty narrow margins.”