Arts & Culture

Stateside
12:04 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Michigan artist Liz Larin's new album is about a "hero's journey"

Credit Peter Schorn / Flickr

Oakland County-based singer-songwriter and producer Liz Larin is coming to the Ark in Ann Arbor on August 3. She joins us today on Stateside to talk about her new CD “Hurricane.”

Larin started with a band in the 1980s and evolved from there as an artist. She plays almost all of the instruments and sings all of the vocals on her record. She even creates the visual images seen when she plays on stage. She said since the 80s, she has become more confident in her musical instincts.

“I hone the songs until the idea is as clear as possible and as visual as possible,” Larin said. “I want the listener to be able to listen to it and picture something – to the right of them, to the left of them – and what is actually going on while they are moving through the music.”

She says "Hurricane" has a narrative arc - a hero’s journey.

“It starts with the idea that everything that you thought about yourself and about the world, it just doesn’t fit anymore,” Larin said. “And you realize you have to go and find yourself and you have to find out what reality is for you.”

Larin said the title track “Hurricane” is the feeling of change. The track “Super Hero” is the story of a parent and a parent’s love for a child.

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Stateside
3:06 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

"Baroque on Beaver" festival starts this weekend

Credit Wikimedia Commons

"Baroque on Beaver" is a classic music festival held on Beaver Island running from July 25 to August 3.

Anne Glendon heads the Beaver Island Cultural Arts Association.

She said there will be about 50 musicians at the festival. Most of them have lived in Michigan or have strong ties to the island.  The concerts are held in different venues on the island. There is a variety of music playing as well, such as chamber music, jazz, and baroque, of course.

“It’s quirky, just like the island and we wouldn’t have it any other way, and also it’s, we think, pretty top rate music,” Glendon said.

Check out the performance list here.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
12:41 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

A new book follows one polar bear's recovery after cruel captivity

In early April 2005, Bärle brought her new cub, Talini, outside into the tundra enclosure for the first time. For the next few weeks, Talini stuck by her mother’s side as if she were tethered.
Credit Courtesy of Tom Roy

They've been on the earth for five million years. From their fur to their body fat, they've evolved to thrive in extremely cold temperatures. So the cruelty of removing a polar bear from its Arctic home and forcing it to live in a filthy Caribbean circus, in temperatures that soar over 100 degrees, is indescribable.

Else Poulson is an animal behaviorist, and she's a guest on today's Stateside program. She's also the president and co-founder of The Bear Care Group. Poulson was part of a Detroit Zoo team that helped a polar bear named Barle after she was rescued from a Caribbean circus called the Mexican Suarez Brothers Circus. Poulson wrote a book about the experience called "Barle's Story: One Polar Bear's Amazing Recovery from Life as a Circus Act."

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That's What They Say
8:55 am
Sun July 20, 2014

Different from, or different than?

For some folks, it makes a big difference whether you say X is different from Y or X is different than Y.

This week on That's What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan look at the confusion surrounding the use of "different from" and "different than."

According to Curzan, both forms are correct and it's just a matter of preference.

"Some people think it should be 'different from' because it is a question of exclusion, it's not a question of degree, so if things are different, you're excluding everything else," says Curzan. "Speakers have been using 'different from' and 'different than' since the 17th century. And in British English, speakers have also used 'different to', so we've got 3 different propositions happening there."

Curzan explains that with a noun, many speakers opt to use either one. For example, one might say a psychologist's view will be 'different than' an economist or a psychologist's view will be 'different from' an economist. In these cases the use of either form is correct.

What about the next phrase? Which one is right? 'Someone went missing' or 'someone is missing.'" Curzan says it's another case of British English entering into American English.

Which form do you prefer to use? Different from or different than? Let us know by leaving a comment below!

Omar Saadeh - Michigan Radio Newsroom

Arts & Culture
4:48 pm
Fri July 18, 2014

Detroit celebrates its 313th birthday next week

Credit Detroit Historical Society

Detroit turns 313 years old next week. The Detroit Historical Society is celebrating with a week's worth of programming beginning tomorrow. 

July 24th marks the day when the French explorer Antoine Cadillac landed on what would later become the city of Detroit.

Each day the group will host a different event- including storytelling, a classic car show, and film screenings.

Bob Sadler is with the Detroit Historical Society. He said celebrating the city is especially important now.

"And based on Detroit’s history of being a hard-working, very creative and entrepreneurial town, I have every reason to believe that we’re reinventing ourselves again," said Sadler. 

Some of the events include: Arsenal of Democracy, Detroit is America’s Motor City, The Streets of Old Detroit, and one of the newer exhibits, the Gallery of Innovation. 

The Detroit Historical Museum is in Midtown Detroit. All of the week's events are free.

– Reem Nasr, Michigan Radio Newsroom

Arts & Culture
11:17 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Flint's all-female poetry slam team goes to national competition

Sapphire Newby, right, practices with a teammate. The white board behind them lists the original poetry that needs to be memorized before the competition.
Credit Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

These girls are ridiculously talented. Hearing their poetry in their own voices is worth it. Press the play button to hear it.

The 17th annual International Youth Poetry Slam festival is in Philadelphia this week.

Flint is sending a team made up entirely of high school girls.

They’ve been practicing for months, writing poetry from their own lives about things like family, abuse, mental illness, and love.

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Arts & Culture
5:30 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Broadway dame and Detroit native Elaine Stritch dies at the age of 89

Stritch was an actor, dancer, singer, and comedian well into her 80's.
Credit Henri Louis Hirschfeld

Let's all raise a strong drink and take off our pants in honor of the one and only Elaine Stritch.

The 89-year-old Broadway legend died today in Birmingham, Michigan, according to media reports.

A native Detroiter with unabashed talent, humor, and a love of good booze, she gained new fame in her 80's for playing Alec Baldwin's mom on "30 Rock."

You only have to hear a snippet of that wry voice to picture her: the white pouf of hair, the bowler cap, the silk shirt over black stockings - and only black stockings.

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Stateside
5:33 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Mitch Albom's "Ernie" is running for the fourth summer in Detroit

Peter Carey (left) as 'Ernie' and T.J. Corbett (right) as 'the Boy'
Credit David Lou Reed

Mitch Albom’s play “Ernie” is now running its fourth summer at the City Theatre in Detroit.

Peter Carey was the understudy for Will Young for two years and took the stage in 2011 as Ernie Harwell, the Detroit Tigers sportscaster.

This is Carey’s first time performing as Ernie in the play.

The only other person on stage with him is T.J. Corbett, playing a young fan. Both actors joined Stateside today to talk about their experience telling the story of Ernie’s final bow at Comerica Park in 2009.

“It means a lot to a lot of people,” Corbett said. “They just keep coming back, sometimes more than once in a season.”

“They love the feeling, the energy that Ernie is and was,” Carey said.

Carey worked with Ernie in TV, radio, and film, including a Disney movie called “Tiger Town.”

They did commercials and live events together and hosted the Grosse Pointe Action Auction. A few months before Ernie passed, they hosted a live radio show in Ann Arbor at Zingerman’s Roadhouse.

“When you were with Ernie, you were his best friend. You were the most important person in that room because he made you feel that way, and you got his full attention,” Carey said.

Ernie Harwell died at the age of 92 in the spring of 2010 from cancer. He broadcasted for the Tigers for 42 years.

T.J. Corbett sets up the frame of the play.

“He’s about to leave when seemingly out of nowhere this kid dressed in 1930s clothing shows up and says, I want to hear your broadcast,’” Corbett said. “And Ernie says ‘I don’t broadcast games anymore,’ so the kid says, ‘well I want to hear the broadcast of your life.’ So Ernie tells the kid the nine innings of his life.”

Mitch Albom's "Ernie" runs now through August 17 at the City Theatre inside the Hockeytown Cafe in Detroit. You can get ticket information through OlympiaEntertainment.com or Ticketmaster.

To learn more about the cast and crew click here.

*Listen to full interview above. 

-Bre'Anna Tinsley, Michigan Radio Newsroom

Arts & Culture
10:40 am
Wed July 16, 2014

A delicate piece of art history in Jackson, Michigan is geting a little help

Glass mural with moving lights from the foyer of the old Consumers Energy building in Jackson, Michigan, shortly before the building was demolished
Credit Chrystal Weesner / Pinterest

A piece of Jackson’s art history, which narrowly avoided the wrecking ball, may soon have new life.

The 28' x 9' glass mural depicting the history of electric power hung in Consumers Energy’s old Jackson headquarters for more than four decades.   

Preservationists were able to save it from the wrecking ball that brought the building down last year. The mural was disassembled and has been in storage ever since.

The plan now is to reconstruct the glass mural, replace its internal lighting system, and build a new outdoor display to house the mural.

The mural would be placed on the grounds of a new city park being built on the site of the old Consumers Energy headquarters.

“We hope to be able to have the new mural in place by….this time next year,” says Grant Bauman, whose part of the team working on the project.

He says the glass mural will add to the mix of public art in downtown Jackson.

This month, the project received a $50,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Organizers still need to raise about $200,000 for the glass mural project.

A Consumers Energy spokesman says the company has contributed to the preservation of the mural in the past, but has not committed to donating to the current project.

Stateside
5:14 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Grab your surf board and hit...Lake Michigan?

Surfing on Lake Michigan
Credit Ben Gauger / Flickr

Surfing in Michigan?

It turns out good surfing is not found just on the North Shore of O’ahu or along the California cost. Try freshwater -- Lake Michigan.

Ella Skrocki is a surf instructor at Sleeping Bear Surf and Kayak.

“Compared to the ocean, it’s not as consistent, but here on the lakes we get a really, really wonderful swell, through the fall is even greater than right now,” Skrocki said.

Skrocki said the inconsistency is actually what makes it special, because on the rare days when the waves start coming in everyone gets excited.

“We have a teeny, tiny community here and everyone gets to connect with each other,” she said.

Skrocki said the best days for a swell is actually when beach goers are in their homes.

“You get these giant storms that bring in on and off shore winds and that creates the waves," she said.

It’s best to wear a wetsuit when surfing on the lakes to protect from the cold water. The surfing season is mainly in the fall, late September through late November.

Skrocki said her best spot to surf really depends on the wind direction, but she prefers Frankfurt, Leland, and Marquette.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
5:07 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Sci-Fi and fantasy convention, "DetCon1," is coming to Detroit

Author Jim C Hines will be at the 2014 North American Science Fiction Convention from July 17th to the 20th. He is one of the Masters of Ceremonies.
Credit jimchines.com

This week the science fiction spotlight will shine on Detroit.

The Motor City will host the 2014 North American Science Fiction Convention from July 17 to July 20.

Jim Hines is a fantasy novelist from Michigan who is also serving as one of the three Masters of Ceremonies for the big convention that’s known as "DetCon1."

“You’ve got a convention center full of authors and fans, and basically just a hotel packed full of geeks,” Hines said when describing DetCon1.

Hines said this is different from ComicCon, who focuses more on the media and anime, where DetCon1 focuses on the literary, novels, stories and authors.

Hines won a Hugo Award in 2012. He said what he loves about science fiction and fantasy the most is the possibility.

“Whether it’s reading or creating the story, those moments when you just have to ask, ‘well what if this?’ And run with an idea that creates that sense of wonder. There’s nothing like it,” Hines said.

Hines is currently working on a series based in Michigan about a librarian from the Upper Peninsula who can pull anything from books that can fit through the pages.

The 2014 North American Science Fiction Convention will be at the Detroit Marriott Renaissance Center. You can get details at their website here.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
11:50 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Can Europe provide the US with a model for how to operate prisons?

Prison cell block
Credit Wikimedia Commons

All across Michigan, serious questions are being raised about the way our state deals with criminals.

The annual price tag for corrections in Michigan is around $2 billion a year. That’s more than is given for higher education. Michigan also keeps prisoners behind bars longer than the national average.

Is that money giving us a safer state? Are there other approaches?

Christopher Moraff, a writer for Next City, wrote an article titled: "Can Europe offer the U.S. a Model for Prison Reform?"

In his piece, Moraff looked mostly at prisons in Germany and the Netherlands.

In contrast to Europe’s rehabilitation mission, U.S. prisons focus much more on punishing convicted criminals through concepts such as minimum sentences and exclusion from communities.

“In neither of those countries, in Germany or the Netherlands, is the sole purpose of incarceration to protect society that’s written in law,” Moraff said.

Moraff said there is an effort to create a normalized set of circumstances to mimic community life as much as possible to re-socialize offenders for when they are released.

Many European prisoners go home on the weekends to visit their families, have the right to vote, wear their own clothes and make their own meals. Prisoners live in cells that resemble a college dorm. They are allowed to decorate their rooms, and guards knock before entering to instill a sense of privacy and humanity.

“If we make the goal re-socialization, dehumanization is not the right way to go about that,” Moraff said.

Moraff said that the guards who work at the correctional facilities have backgrounds in law, mental health, and counseling. They are trained to help provide a therapeutic environment for the people they oversee. They do not simply do head counts and prevent fights.

“There is a level of professionalism and a level of training that goes with this that is unlike anything we have in America,” Moraff said.

Moraff said there have been some efforts made in Pennsylvania and Colorado to retrain their staff in these methods.

*Listen to full story above

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Arts & Culture
4:49 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

Michigan Shakespeare Festival will expand next year

This is the 20th anniversary season for the Michigan Shakespeare Festival. The company has begun rehearsing in costume for opening night on Thursday, July 17.
Credit Michigan Shakespeare Festival

This Thursday marks the opening night of the Michigan Shakespeare Festival.

The festival has been based in Jackson for its 20 years of performances.

But that will soon change.

The group has partnered with a theater in Canton, west of Detroit, to reach a broader audience.

Starting next year, the festival will expand to host three weeks of performances at The Village Theater at Cherry Hill.

Janice L. Blixt is the artistic director for the festival. She says they're excited to share these works with as many people as possible.

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Stateside
4:36 pm
Mon July 14, 2014

The mayor of Jackson, Michigan shares his thoughts on the prison museum

Credit Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

What’s one of the first things that comes to mind when you think of the city of Jackson?

For many, the answer might well be "The Prison."

We even call it “Jackson Prison”, although its official name is the State Prison of Southern Michigan.

Recently on Stateside we told you about the opening of a new museum right at the prison: the Cell Block 7 Prison Museum gives you a chance to explore a prison block with five-floors and 515 cells. 

It hasn’t housed prisoners for seven years, but you will get a real feel for life inside, and for the history of the Southern Michigan Prison.

We wondered how this all strikes the people of Jackson.

Is playing host to a huge prison something they shun or own?

The Mayor of Jackson, Jason Smith, joined Stateside to answer the question.

*Listen to full interview above. 

Stateside
11:14 am
Mon July 14, 2014

This Michigan woman was a conductor on the Underground Railroad

Laura Smith Haviland in about 1879.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

When you think of the Underground Railroad, one name you may not recognize is Laura Smith Haviland.

She helped many slaves escape from the South to freedom, and she was from Michigan.

Michigan was a crucial stop on the Underground Railroad.

Before and during the Civil War, many Michiganders helped slaves escape to freedom in Canada by crossing the border in Port Huron or Detroit.

In 1832, Laura Haviland co-founded the Logan Female Anti-Slavery Society and the Raisin Institute, which became a safe space for African American fugitives of slavery and attracted black settlers in Michigan.

In the 1840s and 1850s, Haviland traveled between Michigan, Ohio, and Canada assisting slaves in escapes, teaching African American students, and making public anti-slavery speeches.

Southern slave owners had a $3,000 reward for her capture.

Tiya Miles is chair of the Department of African-American Studies at the University of Michigan and will be a keynote speaker at the National Underground Railroad Conference being held in Detroit this week.

“Laura Haviland was an incredible woman, and she is someone who faced daunting challenges that you and I - I don’t think, could ever imagine,” Miles said.

Miles said that women were not expected to be independent and involved in political issues at this time. There was a lot of criticism of her from her fellow abolitionists. She was seen as someone who outright rejected the conservative gender roles.

The National Parks Service is hosting its annual conference on the Underground Railroad in Detroit from July 16 to July 20. The theme is "Women and the Underground Railroad."

*Listen to the full interview above

That's What They Say
10:08 am
Sun July 13, 2014

Uncles have avuncular, what do aunts have?

Uncles have their own adjective in avuncular, but aunts don’t have any such adjective.

On this week's edition of That's What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan explore adjectives related to family members.  

“Paternal related to fathers, maternal for mothers, fraternal for brothers, sororal, which is not a really common adjective but it’s available in the language related to sisters. You get filial related to sons and daughters, and then parental for parents,” says Curzan.   

She also points out that these adjective that come from Latin often feel more formal than their Germanic synonyms.

“What we are seeing here is a wider pattern in the English language where we have these synonyms where one is borrowed like paternal or maternal and one of them is a native English word. It’s a Germanic word that’s been in English since English has been around. And often the native English word will feel warmer to us. It will feel closer to us and the borrowed one will feel a little bit more formal.”

Listen to the segment above.

M I Curious
4:04 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

What explains Michigan's large Arab American community?

A photo of the Arab American Festival in Michigan.
Credit The Arab American News.com

Michigan Radio is launching M I Curious - a news experiment where we investigate questions submitted by the public about our state and its people.

Our first installment of M I Curious originated with Jeff Duncan, a firefighter from Sterling Heights. He submitted this question:

Why is there such a large Arab American community in southeast Michigan?

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Stateside
1:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

A new book takes a closer look at marijuana prohibiton

Credit anewleafbook.tumblr.com

 

Investigative journalists Alyson Martin and Nushin Rashidian present a book that explores the new landscape of cannabis in the United States in a book called A New Leaf: The End of Cannabis Prohibition.

Voters in 22 states, including Michigan, have said yes to medical marijuana laws. In November 2012, voters in Colorado and Washington legalized recreational use of marijuana.

Public opinion continues to shift toward policies that favor legalizing cannabis.

Yet, 49.5% of federal government drug-related arrests involve the sale, manufacture, or possession of cannabis.

In their book, Martin and Rashidian interviewed patients, growers, entrepreneurs, politicians, activists, and regulators in nearly every state with a medical cannabis law.

They analyze how recent milestones toward legalization will affect the war on drugs both domestically and internationally. The book is a unique account of how legalization is manifesting itself in the lives of millions.

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Stateside
4:21 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

A new board game that explores Mackinac Island

Credit Wikimedia Commons

The board game is actually five games in one.

There is a new board game called “Mackinac Island Treasure Hunt.” It was created to get people thinking more about Michigan's natural beauty and historical treasures.

Jim Muratski, co- creator with Barbara Overdier, said they came up with the idea when they were in the woods thinking to themselves, “what’s a good way to have other people see what’s happening out here?”

“I think people are used to just visiting the downtown part of Mackinac Island and not really getting out into the state park area, which we find pretty fascinating,” Muratski said.

The board game is actually five games in one. There is a card game, a nature hike board game, a cooperative scavenger hunt game, a memory game, and a treasure hunt game.

More information on the board game is available here

*Listen to full interview above. 

Stateside
4:19 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

The Cell Block 7 Prison Museum catalogs the prison's history

Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

It's been known for decades as the world's largest walled prison - the State Prison of Southern Michigan in Jackson.

Now some of the very colorful stories from that prison and from Jackson are told in the new Cell Block 7 Prison Museum. It's a joint venture of the Ella Sharp Museum and the Michigan Department of Corrections.

The museum is renting part of cell block seven, which still houses inmates.

MLive’s Leanne Smith said the museum covers the history of the prison, the inmates, wardens, and guards since 1838.

“It is an actual cell block,” Smith said. “You walk in and there is no doubt as to where you are.”

*Listen to full interview above. 

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