detroit economic growth corporation

via Think Detroit PAL

DETROIT — A $33 million plan to build apartments and retail shops on the city-owned site of the old Tiger Stadium and a second proposal for a Detroit youth sports headquarters on the land are moving forward.

The Detroit Economic Growth Corp. board approved the plans Tuesday for the fabled corner of Michigan and Trumbull.

Bloomfield Hills-based Larson Realty Group wants to construct a 4-story building that includes retail space and 102 apartments in a project called The Corner. Two dozen town houses also are planned.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

In Detroit, city leaders are debating the best way to make sure the city’s neighborhoods see real gains from new development.

One proposal: a city ordinance that would require some big new projects include so-called “community benefits agreements.”

But the idea has some people worried, and has generated pushback in Detroit and beyond.


Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

The Detroit City Council has approved a major land deal to create a new hockey arena and entertainment district.

The Council transferred all city-owned land within the 45-block entertainment district’s borders to Detroit’s Downtown Development Authority Tuesday – for just $1.

That Authority will manage the mega-development, along with Olympia Development of Michigan.

Wikipedia

The Detroit Red Wings are a step closer to getting a new home.

Detroit’s Downtown Development Authority approved a concession management agreement that provides the framework for a new $450 million sports and entertainment arena Friday.

It's officially the law of the land.

Governor Rick Snyder signed the Medicaid expansion into law today.

The expansion will provide Medicaid services to hundreds of thousands of working-poor in the state through the federal Affordable Care Act. On today's show, what the expansion means for Michigan and what's next on the Governor's and the Legislature's agenda.

And, Brandon and Bethany Foote, the couple behind the musical group Gifts or Creatures, joined us today to talk about their music.

Also, Rivertown, a $55 million proposed development along the east riverfront in Detroit, recently won approval from the Detroit Economic Development Corporation. How are developments like this possible when Detroit is bankrupt?

First on the show, in Michigan, by state law, the day after Labor Day is Back-To-School Day.

But in some 30 districts and charter schools in Michigan, kids have already been going to school because these districts and schools are experimenting with year-round school.

It's a concept getting much attention with the realization that our traditional school schedule causes most kids to forget some of the reading and math skills over the long summer break. That forces teachers to spend the first month or more re-teaching the previous year's material.

What does year-round school look like and is there a demand for it?

For the answer, we turned to the Crosswell-Lexington Community Schools in rural Sanilac County, which is offering the option of a year-round schedule.

Superintendent Kevin Miller joined us today.

User: Fabienne Kneifel/Flickr

The news of Detroit's bankruptcy filing has been relentless.

But that Chapter 9 filing does not seem to be completely stalling economic growth and development in and around downtown.

Case in point: Rivertown -- a $55 million proposed development along the east riverfront. It recently won approval from the Detroit Economic Development Corporation.

Rivertown would have townhouses, apartments and small-scale retail.

Richard Baron, chairman and CEO of real estate development firm McCormick Baron Salazar, joined us today to talk about the development.

Listen to the full interview above.

Budd Lynch began his career with the Red Wings at Detroit's Olympia Arena.
Library of Congress / wikimedia commons

The irony was certainly not lost on many when just about the time the city of Detroit filed for bankruptcy protection Governor Snyder gave the green light to a new arena for the Detroit Red Wings, an arena to be located just immediately north of downtown.

Plans are calling for an 18,000 seat state of the art arena and accompanying entertainment district. It’ll be funded with a mix of $365.5 million in private investment and an estimated public investment of $284 million.

The Detroit Economic Growth Corporation is predicting the new Wings arena and mixed use district could create about 8,300 jobs and it predicts a statewide economic impact of $1.8 billion.

Marvin Surkin would like to challenge the statement that a new sports arena can energize a financially depleted city and boost its morale. He is a specialist in comparative urban politics and co-author of the book "Detroit: I Do Mind Dying." He joined us today from New York City.

Listen to the full interview above.

wikimedia commons

500 new employees moved into downtown Detroit’s First National Building Wednesday. City officials and business leaders say it’s yet another sign of Detroit’s resurgent business district. 

They held a pep rally of sorts to welcome the new employees downtown. They’re from the title insurance and property valuation company Title Source, which has plans to move another 1000 employees downtown  from the suburbs soon.

Kevin Ward / wikimedia commons

The city of Detroit has again put a damper on plans to keep baseball at the site of the former Tiger Stadium.

Chevrolet had proposed a plan what it calls the “hallowed” site to create a “new ballpark for Detroit’s youth.”

Chevy said it had support from the Detroit Tigers, and a non-profit group called the Old Tiger Stadium Conservancy.

But the Detroit Economic Growth Corporation quashed the proposal. DEGC head George Jackson says it just wasn’t a good idea.