Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Lately, there have been a lot of allegations of funny business within American politics. 

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has repeatedly said that the elections could be rigged. And there have been a lot of concerns that the Russians hacked the Democratic Party's emails. 

The next logical question for many people is, if both those things are true, what's to keep the election results from being hacked?

Raido / Flickr.com

The National Insurance Crime Bureau warns that hacking poses an ever-growing threat to car owners, as cars increasingly become computers with wi-fi on wheels.

"As more and more technology is incorporated, the vulnerability is huge," says the Bureau's Frank Scafidi.  "We're not seeing huge events like this or great numbers.  It is sporadic but it is something to be aware of."

A recent video caught a thief sitting in a car with his laptop, reprogramming a car to start, most likely using a new, blank key. A few minutes later, he takes off in the car.

There is a growing trend of hackers using stolen data to blackmail companies and individuals.
hackNY.org / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

We hear so much about data breaches and hacked passwords, but what is it really all about? What does an attacker do with your passwords, credit card information and other hacked data?

person using a computer
flickr user Christopher Schirner / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

You may have seen recent news stories describing some U.S. hospitals being hit by malware attacks. 

This "ransomware" works by locking up computers until an amount of money, usually in the form of bitcoins, is paid to the hacker. 

When hospitals are hit, patient records can be in danger.

Courtesy photo / Fiat Chrysler Automobiles

Fiat Chrysler is recalling 1.4 million vehicles to prevent hackers from being able to remotely control the cars and trucks.

A couple of professional hackers worked with a reporter for Wired magazine to remotely access the computer system in a Jeep Cherokee. The magazine has posted a video showing what hackers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek could do.

They kill the engine, disable the brakes, mess with the A/C and the radio.

Raido / Flickr.com

Fiat Chrysler says it has a software remedy available to customers, after two hacking experts took remote control of a Jeep Cherokee using the Internet.

Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek used the Jeep's UConnect system to gain access to the moving vehicle, which was being operated by WIRED's Andy Greenberg.


Those high-tech electronic systems that ideally improve safety could turn around to bite us.

A recently released report by U.S. Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., found that millions of cars and trucks are dangerously vulnerable to hacking.

Michigan Engineering / Flickr

Michigan Stadium will be full of college students this weekend. But these students aren't watching a football game -- they're hackers.

A University of Michigan group called MHacks is sponsoring a 36-hour hackathon. It's a competition that challenges participants to use technology to create inventions that solve modern problems.

Thomas Erdmann is a junior at Michigan and the president of MHacks. He says the word hacking gets a bad rap. Erdmann says the hackathon represents what the word hacking really means to engineers.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

A federal court website in Detroit may be the latest victim of a hacking campaign by online activists.

The group, Anonymous,  has claimed responsibility for several attacks on government websites. The group is opposed to online censorship and other government intrusions.

Rod Hansen is the spokesman for the eastern district court. He says technicians are checking the Eastern District of Michigan's U-S Probation Office website, after media reports that hackers installed a destructive ‘video game’ on the website.