Health

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Starting next week, Flint pastors will begin handing out water filters to people who don’t trust the city’s tap water.

The 1500 water filters come from an anonymous donor. A spokesman says the filters will remove particulates, like lead. 

everydayfamily.com

This is the first new school year that parents have to attend vaccination education sessions at their county health department, if they want a vaccination waiver for kids going into preschool, kindergarten, or seventh grade. 

Because Michigan has one of the highest waiver rates in the country, the idea is to make it less convenient to get those waivers.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new study suggests, if you are depressed don’t pick up your smart phone.

Michigan State University's Prabu David, the dean of the college of Communication Arts and Sciences, was part of a team of researchers who studied common uses of smart phones, including as a way to alleviate feelings of sadness or depression.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Many women recovering from breast cancer are skipping some treatment. 

A new University of Michigan study looks at why. 

(courtesy of HIVandHepatitis.com)

Doctors have been grossly underestimating liver damage in patients with hepatitis C, according to a new study in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

The study, which involved 9,783 patients, showed that 2,788, or 29 percent, had signs of cirrhosis, but only 1,727 had the condition properly documented in their medical records. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

As many as 20,000 runners and walkers will take part in the Crim Festival of Races this weekend in Flint.

This week, the Crim Fitness Foundation announced a partnership with the University of Michigan-Flint to expand its campaign year-round.

flickr user The National Guard / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


When we talk about post-traumatic stress disorder, the conversation usually focuses on our members of the military, both active-duty and veterans.

But that misses a large group of men and women who struggle with PTSD: our first responders.

Kate Hiscock / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Funding cuts are forcing a west Michigan organization that helps people with developmental disabilities and other employment barriers find jobs to shut its doors.

Kandu Industries in Holland provides vocational training, job placement and other services for thousands of people with cognitive impairments, physical disabilities and other barriers that could make it difficult to find employment.

Robert Plutchik's Wheel of Emotions
user Machine Elf 1735 / Wikimedia Commons

Whether you have personal struggles, or you know a family member or friend who has needed help - it seems just about everyone has been personally touched by mental health issues at some point in their life.

The reporters and producers at Michigan Radio are planning a series of stories focusing on mental health in Michigan. But before we get started, we want to hear from you.

What questions or issues have you run across that you want answers to?

The University of Michigan Health System
UM

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, better known as HIPAA, is a federal law passed in 1996 that includes a privacy section establishing national standards for patient confidentiality.

But Michigan has its own laws on the books regarding a patient’s right to privacy.

Report: Michigan could do more to prevent cancer

Aug 6, 2015
No Smoking sign
capl@washjeff.edu / Creative Commons

 A new report suggests Michigan could do more to curb cancer, including raising the tobacco tax and increasing funding to tobacco prevention programs. 

The report is from the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. The organization has created a report for each state, which looks at nine public policy areas. 

Library of Congress / Wikimedia Commons

Ninety two years ago this week, an American president died.

Warren G. Harding became the sixth chief executive to die on office. His death fueled rumors, including the bizarre claim that the First Lady had poisoned the President.

Harding was on 15,000 mile tour of the nation called “The Voyage of Understanding” when he passed.

Harding was in San Francisco and his wife was reading a complimentary newspaper article about him out loud.

Suddenly, “he shuddered and fell on his bed and, as they say, dropped dead,” says Dr. Howard Markel of the University of Michigan Medical School.

Public Domain

Hospitals are supposed to make their patients better, but some may be making patients sick.

A new set of hospital ratings from Consumer Reports says nine of the Detroit area's largest hospitals aren't doing enough to prevent patients from contracting infections during hospital stays.

Beaumont Health System

The Oakland County sheriff says there's an easy way to crack down on prescription drug abuse: require doctors to use a statewide, online database every time they write a prescription for serious painkillers.

Michigan already has an online system called MAPS, the Michigan Automated Prescription System.

Wikimedia Commons / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

This week marks the 94th anniversary of the birth of one of the most determined and important women in medical science: Rosalyn Yalow.

While many people may not know her by name, countless patients have benefited from her research.

"She's one of the unsung heroes of modern radiation medicine," says University of Michigan medical historian Dr. Howard Markel.

Carolyn Gearig / Michigan Radio

Michigan has a serious opioid problem. A new task force is looking for public input on how to fix it.

In 2013, more than 400 people in Michigan died from drug overdoses – mainly heroin and prescription painkillers like OxyContin. At least 3,000, at the very least, have died since 2005.

Carolyn Gearig / Michigan Radio

In 2013, Michigan’s drug-related death rate was 18.5 deaths per 100,000 people*, higher than most other states in the country. The U.S. average was 14.6.

An internal memo from the Environmental Protection Agency is raising concerns about lead in Flint’s water.

Courtesy photo / Oscar G. Johnson VA Medical Center

More Michigan veterans are trying “telehealth” appointments.

It’s sort of like seeing your doctor through a computer online, but the computer can also relay a heartbeat, the sound of a person's lungs, or detailed pictures of an injury.

Courtesy photo / Oscar G. Johnson VA Medical Center

The VA hospital that serves 26,000 veterans in the Upper Peninsula and northern Wisconsin is having trouble recruiting healthcare providers.

Plus, almost one in five employees at the Oscar G. Johnson VA Medical Center is eligible for retirement.

Brad Nelson is a spokesman for the Iron Mountain based clinic. He says they’ve compiled a list of providers they’re expecting to be short on in the next decade.

Bellamy Creek Correctional Facility
Michigan Department of Corrections / Facebook.com

Michigan improperly spent $1.7 million on health care for former inmates. That’s according to a new audit that tracked payments between October 2011 and April 2014.

The Michigan Department of Corrections (MDOC) pays for inmates to see doctors while they’re in prison. But officials say the problem apparently occurred after more than 300 went back to the same doctors after being released or paroled.

Children playing with toys
The Children's Healing Center

A new recreation center set to open in Grand Rapids will give children with weak immune systems and their families a safe, germ-free place to play.

The Children's Healing Center has been specially-designed for children facing cancer, auto-immune diseases, organ transplants or other conditions that put them at high risk for infection.

A big chunk of the center's budget will go toward keeping it as clean as possible.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new poll shows shifting views on the safety of childhood vaccines.

The University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health asked parents how their views have changed during the past year.

Poll director Matt Davis says a third of parents say they believe vaccines are safer and more effective than they thought a year ago. A smaller percentage have more doubts.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new University of Michigan study finds teenage girls are less likely to use contraception if they are obese.  

Researchers from the U of M Health System surveyed 900 18- and 19-year-old Michigan women.  

The researchers found obese teens are less likely to use contraception than their normal weight peers.  Obese girls who do use contraception are less likely to use it consistently.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s effort to prepare for threats like Ebola is getting a boost from the federal government.

Michigan’s Special Pathogen Response Network is getting a $5.5 million dollar grant from the Centers for Disease Control and another federal agency. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s another problem connected to Flint’s troubled city water supply.

The University of Michigan-Flint sent an email this week to people on campus, warning of elevated levels of a disinfectant by-product known as Total Trihalomethanes or TTHM in the water on campus.

Charlie Davidson / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

It's easy to assume that all adolescent pregnancies are unplanned. But some teenagers do plan to become pregnant. Instead of worrying about birth control or abstinence, these teenagers actually try to conceive. And they have high hopes that a child will bring more love and meaning into their lives.  

Twenty-one-year-old Tawney Morris is trying to make the best of a hot day with her two-year-old son, Chaz. She sets up a slide and kiddie pool outside their apartment in Traverse City.

imelenchon / morgueFile

Powdered alcohol was legalized this year and is hitting the marketplace this summer.

But some states have already banned it. 

Last month, Michigan’s Senate said yes – unanimously – to a ban.

A new poll from the University of Michigan finds a majority of the public is right there with the state senators. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan has a growing problem with accidental deaths, according to a new report.

The Trust for America’s Health released its new report “The Facts Hurt” today.    

The report looks at drug overdoses, motor vehicle crashes, head injuries, sexual violence, homicides, child abuse and other causes of fatal injuries.

Chris Goldberg / Flickr http://ow.ly/NtcRu

THIS STORY WAS UPDATED AT 2:06 pm on 6/15/15

Under legislation introduced in the Michigan House, health insurance policies would be required to cover wigs for children who lose their hair due to illness.

The wigs would be classified as prosthetics, and the law would require they be covered at the same rate as other prosthetics. 

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