plants

Environment & Science
1:25 pm
Sun June 22, 2014

A rare bloom is expected to cause a big stink in East Lansing this week

Many people, like Pam Saunders, lined up last week to take a look, and sneak a sniff, of the Corpse Flower before it bloomed. The experience this week will not be as pleasant.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Hundreds of people are expected to be drawn like flies to see and smell a reeking flower in East Lansing this week. 

“The Latin name for this plant is Amorphophallus Titanium,” says Peter Carrington, assistant curator of MSU’s Beal Botanical Garden, “which gloriously translates into "the very huge misshapen penis.”

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Stateside
6:22 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

80-year-old agave plant about to show its only bloom in Ann Arbor

Mike Palmer, horticulture manager at Matthaei Botanical Gardens & Nichols Arboretum, stands in front of the American agave plant.
Credit Matthaei Botanical Gardens

It was 1934. The nation was deep in the Great Depression. Franklin Delano Roosevelt was in the White House. William Comstock was Michigan's 33rd governor.

And a University of Michigan graduate student in botany found an agave plant while on a botanical expedition to Mexico. He brought it back to Ann Arbor.

Now, 80 years later, that agave plant is getting set to bloom – for its first and only time.

Michael Palmer is the horticultural manager at the Matthaei Botanical Gardens and the Nichols Arboretum and he joined us today.

*Listen to the interview above.

Stateside
5:29 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Invasive plant species are threatening the Great Lakes

dnr.wi.gov

An interview with Jo Latimore, an outreach specialist with the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at MSU.

We have had many conversations on Stateside about invasive species, usually the type with scales and gills, such as Asian carp.

Today, we focus on invasive species with chlorophyll. Yes, non-native plants that are invading ecosystems in the Great Lakes.

Jo Latimore is an outreach specialist with the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University, and she joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Environment & Science
4:25 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

MSU study celebrates marriage of algae gene to a weed

Christoph Benning, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at MSU
Credit Courtesy: Michigan State University

Michigan State University researchers are celebrating the marriage of a weed and an algae gene -- and its value as a potential biofuel. 

The team found that adding an algae gene to mustard weed caused the plant to store oil in its leaves, and the technique could be used to get more energy out of plants grown for bio-fuel.

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Have Vines, Will Travel
10:30 am
Tue October 19, 2010

The Kudzu of the North

If you've ever lived in the south, you know kudzu. It's an invasive plant that grows like crazy. Covers highway signs and telephone poles and anything that doesn't run fast enough.

There's a plant in Michigan that's getting a little crazy too. It's not kudzu-crazy yet, but experts say we need to get a handle on it.

It has a memorable name: dog-strangling vine.

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