Politics & Government

Stateside
4:32 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, July 8, 2014

  Today on Stateside:

·         Budget update: Everyone who writes a tuition payment check has one question: Is tuition going up?

·         Why were 30 million pounds of tart cherries left to rot on the ground, much of those from Michigan? And why are we eating Polish and Canadian cherries in our pies?

·        A West Michigan mom shares her son’s life with cerebral palsy in her memoir He Plays A Harp.

·         A new board game called Mackinac Island Treasure Hunt.

·         What can elected officials do to appeal to millennial voters?

·         The Cell Block 7 Prison Museum opens in Jackson.

*Listen to full show above. 

Stateside
11:48 am
Tue July 8, 2014

What will get "millennials" into the voting booth?

Credit Theresa Thompson / Flickr

“With our generation and having Twitter and Facebook, we are blasted with a lot of the 24 hour news cycle

The curtain is closing on baby boomers, as the so-called "millennial generation" is taking up a larger share of the electorate. This voting block surpasses seniors who are eligible to vote.

But many millennials are not politically engaged.

“We feel that as one voice, as a younger person, we don’t have a lot of say in politics and I think that also drives their decision to remain out of the discussion as well,” said Connor Walby, a millennial and the campaign manager for State Rep. Frank Foster, R-Petoskey.

Walby also said the negative messages in politics that are seen on social media affect millennials' decision to vote as well.

“With our generation and having Twitter and Facebook, we are blasted with a lot of the 24 hour news cycle. And with that you also get a lot of the negative news coverage,” Walby said.  “I think a lot of our generation is pretty sick and tired of some of the policies that have been put in place and they are just sick of the politicians and the political atmosphere in general.”

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Stateside
4:44 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Stateside for Monday, July 7, 2014

  Today on Stateside:

·         The money for K-12. There's nearly 14-billion dollars. Who's getting what?

·         73 years ago a Congressman from Washington State floated a new idea: build a highway from Alaska to Detroit.

·         Unsettling news in the war on HIV: cases in Washtenaw County hit a 15 year high.

·         Every movement has its landmarks and history. And that certainly holds true for the gay rights movement. Other major American cities have had their LGBT history told, but what of Detroit?

·         There is less interest in the “Up North” cottage market, however cottages are now cheaper than ever.

*Listen to full show above. 

Politics & Government
7:00 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Monday is the deadline to register to vote in Michigan primary

Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The deadline to register to vote in Michigan's primary is today.

On Aug. 5, Michiganders will vote in the party primaries for state House and Senate seats.

But turnout has been historically low in the primaries.

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Politics & Government
6:00 am
Mon July 7, 2014

As Detroit water shutoffs continue, groups look to provide emergency relief

Water bottles, with attached fliers, ready for distribution at the Dexter-Elmhurst Community Center.
Credit Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Thousands of Detroit residents are without water service right now due to unpaid bills—but social service agencies and community groups are trying to make sure no one goes thirsty.

The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department cut off service to more than 7500 delinquent account-holders in April and May—and ramped up shutoffs in June.

Department officials say it’s a necessary step to collect millions of dollars in back payments.

But critics say it’s caused real suffering, and could lead to a public health crisis.

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Politics & Government
1:35 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Deadline approaches for bankruptcy plan vote

Credit JSFauxtaugraphy/Flickr

DETROIT (AP) - The most anticipated vote in Detroit this summer isn't for a city office.

Instead, ballots due by Friday from city retirees could determine how quickly Detroit exits its historic bankruptcy and how much of the financial weight pensioners will bear.

Non-uniformed retirees are being asked to take a 4.5 percent pension cut and no cost-of-living allowances. Police and fire retirees are faced with reduced cost-of-living payments.

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Politics & Government
8:00 am
Sat July 5, 2014

Some children fleeing Central American violence may be headed to Michigan

Credit via Center for American Progress

Michigan will probably receive some refugee children from Central America—but not an “overwhelming number” of them, according to one immigrant rights advocate.

About 50,000 unaccompanied minors, mostly from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, have overwhelmed the southern border in recent months. Most say they’re fleeing mounting gang violence, chronic poverty, and social breakdown in those countries.

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Stateside
11:14 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, July 3, 2014

Today on Stateside:

  • A new report finds that of the $18 million spent on campaign TV ads over the first half of this year, outside groups kicked in 14 million of that money. We asked who had been working so hard to flood the airwaves, and how it might impact the way you vote.
  • Detroit's bankruptcy settlement has gotten through the State Legislature and the private foundations. Now it's up to 32,000 city employees and retirees. Michigan Radio's Detroit reporter Sarah Cwiek joined us to discuss where the voting is now.
  • Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan has been at the job for six months. Today Detroit News Columnist Daniel Howes reviewed his time in office.
  • Tomorrow is the Fourth of July, but today we brushed up on the history of the Star Spangled Banner.
  • And tomorrow's celebration will also mean lots of traditions, fireworks, parades, and barbeques. More often than not, it’s the men doing the grilling. Stateside’s Renee Gross looked at why men are usually the ones manning the grill.
  • We also spoke with one Detroiter who refused to say nice things about his city. He explained why.

Stateside
10:56 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Duggan’s results in 6 months not going unnoticed

Credit Mike Duggan

There seems to be little doubt that Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan is making his mark.

His bulldog nature and savvy political instincts have combined to make Mike Duggan a force to be reckoned with, even as he serves under a state-appointed emergency manager.

Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes reviewed Duggan's progress in his first six months. He said that people should not expect that he change the world in 6 months. What’s important here is the process and the direction.

“The direction is positive and bipartisan, and he’s clearly repaired relationships with city council,” he said.

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Stateside
9:49 am
Fri July 4, 2014

One week until deadline to vote on Detroit's bankruptcy settlement. Where do things stand?

Credit Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

The clock is ticking.

Detroit's bankruptcy settlement has gotten through the State Legislature and the private foundations. Now it's all up to 32,000 city employees and retirees.

They're being asked to say "yes" to having their pensions cut, and promising not to sue the city.

In return, the pension cuts will not be as severe as they would be under what's become known as the Grand Bargain.

Michigan Radio's Detroit reporter Sarah Cwiek joined us on Stateside. She explained the transparency issue surrounding the voting process, what the different classifications of retirees mean, and what we should keep our eyes on, during next week leading up to the July 11th deadline.

*Listen to full interview above.

Stateside
8:30 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Outside groups outspend Michigan candidates on campaign TV ads

Credit User: Keith Ivey / flickr

A new report finds that for every dollar spent by a Michigan candidate in campaign ads, outside groups have spent $3.50.

Looking at it another way: of the $18 million spent on campaign TV ads over the first half of this year, outside groups paid for $14 million of that.

Rich Robinson, executive director of the campaign spending watchdog group Michigan Campaign Finance Network, talked about the consequences of outside money in Michigan political campaigns.

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Politics & Government
10:46 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

After rejecting consent agreement, Lincoln Park gets an emergency manager

Credit Andrew Jameson

Governor Snyder has named Brad Coulter as emergency manager for the city of Lincoln Park.

Coulter will take a leave of absence from his job as a consultant with O’Keefe & Associates, a firm specializing in turnaround restructuring and corporate finance services, to try and balance the downriver Detroit suburb’s books.

Lincoln Park’s mayor and city council asked the Michigan Department of Treasury to review its finances last year.

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Weekly Political Roundup
4:27 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Weekly Political Roundup: Outside money targets campaign ads in Michigan

Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

    

It’s Thursday, the day we talk Michigan politics with Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants.

We’re still about a month out from the primaries and four months out from the general election. Yet, the Michigan Campaign Finance Network this week reports that $18 million have already been spent in the Michigan gubernatorial and senate races. And such of this money is coming from outside groups.

Is it surprising that this much outside money is coming into Michigan so early or is this election politics as usual?

Politics & Government
6:00 am
Thu July 3, 2014

Aramark contract "up in the air" after more maggots found in prison food

Credit wikimedia commons

Aramark Correctional Services, the private company that provides food to Michigan prisons, is in trouble again.

Inmates at the Charles Egeler Reception & Guidance Center in Jackson found maggots while peeling potatoes Tuesday morning.

Michigan Department of Corrections spokesman Russ Marlan says the warden was notified, and quickly moved to dispose of all the potatoes.

The kitchen was then thoroughly bleached. No resulting health problems have been reported.

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Stateside
5:02 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Stateside
4:32 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Road-funding trouble in D.C. could be bad for Michigan

Credit Wikimedia Commons

There was much anger and disappointment last month when state lawmakers failed to figure out a way to fund badly needed road repairs before leaving for their summer break.

And now there's road funding trouble ahead in Washington, D.C. Federal gas taxes go into the Federal Highway Trust Fund. The money is handed out to states in the form of road construction payments.

Michigan gets more than $1 billion a year from the trust fund. But that could come to a screeching halt before the summer is out.

Mlive's Jonathon Oosting wrote that the fund is running low due to declining fuel tax revenue, and could be fully depleted by late August or September.

“The federal government is already making plans to scale back payments to states such as Michigan, if Congress doesn’t figure out a way to replenish this fund,” Oosting said.

The fund is not collecting as much money as it used to from gas taxes, as people are driving more fuel-efficient vehicles, or opting out of driving in favor of public transportation.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

Politics & Government
1:40 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Outside groups already spending big in Michigan's U.S. Senate and governor's races

Even though outside groups are hoping to sway Michigan voters in November with their political ads, the Michigan Campaign Finance Network's Rich Robinson says the benefit of such early TV ad spending is questionable for candidates and their supporters.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Nearly $18 million has been spent so far this year on political TV ads in Michigan’s U. S. Senate and governor’s races. Most of the money has been coming from national Republican, Democratic, conservative and liberal groups.

Rich Robinson is the executive director of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network. He analyzed TV ad buys by political groups in a half dozen television markets in Michigan. 

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Politics & Government
10:25 am
Wed July 2, 2014

The week in Michigan politics

Credit user aunt owwee / Flickr

This Week in Michigan Politics, Emily Fox and Jack Lessenberry discuss how Michigan businesses will be affected by the US Supreme Court ruling that corporations don't have to include contraceptive coverage for employees for religious reasons, what the state is doing to prevent more felons from being home health care workers for Medicaid patients, and the new budget bill for the state.

The week in Michigan politics interview for 7/2/14

Politics & Government
5:05 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Snyder: Prison food contract troubles are “unacceptable”

Maggots were found in the meal area at a prison in Jackson recently.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Governor Rick Snyder says a deal with a private contractor to provide food for state prisons could be terminated if there are future problems with the company. Aramark Food Services was awarded the $145 million, three-year contract last December. But the arrangement has been beset by problems since then.

Aramark has been fined by the state for unapproved menu changes and running out of food. Also, 70 Aramark employees are banned from state prisons for inappropriate relationships with prisoners.

Most recently, maggots were found in the meal area at a prison in Jackson.

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Stateside
4:54 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Stateside for Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Today on Stateside:

  • A conversation with Detroit Police Chief James Craig about the struggles and successes of his first year.
  • Gov. Rick Snyder signed Michigan's school aid budget last week that included a provision ordering the Michigan Department of Education to produce and administer a MEAP test in the next school year – not the Smarter Balanced Assessment test they'd been planning to use.
  • Michigan is one of the more dangerous states in the country when it comes to lightning strikes.
  • A mosquito invasion is coming to Michigan this summer. One species came about as a result of the polar vortex.

*Listen to the full show above.

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