Politics & Government

Stories about politics and government actions

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were in Michigan this week to deliver big economic speeches. This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth talk about each candidate's fiscal vision, and whether it will resonate with voters. Lessenberry and Kruth also discuss the latest move in a battle over straight-ticket voting in the state.


Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The federal emergency declaration for the Flint water crisis ends Sunday.

One big change will be who’s paying for all the bottled water and filters being handed out to Flint residents.

The feds have been picking up 75% of the cost, with the state chipping in 25%.  

Now the state will have to pay 100% of the costs. 

A map shows the link between water debt and property tax foreclosures in Detroit.
We the People of Detroit Community Research Collective

New citizen-led research is drawing a link between two of Detroit’s biggest social crises: water service shutoffs, and property tax foreclosures.

The We the People of Detroit Community Research Collective gathered that data for its report “Mapping the Water Crisis: The Dismantling of African American Neighborhoods in Detroit.”

Detroit’s aggressive and controversial water shutoff policy for delinquent households was ramped up during the city’s bankruptcy, and has continued with some modifications since then.

Stateside 8.12.2016

Aug 12, 2016

Today, we reflect on Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton's visits to Michigan this week. And, we learn about rising out-of-pocket health care costs. 

According to Charley Ballard, the biggest difference between Trump and Clinton is their stance on immigration.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Warren this week to lay out her economic vision for the country. The speech was also intended to counter the speech given by her Republican rival, Donald Trump, at the Detroit Economic Club. 

Michigan State University economics professor Charley Ballard joins Stateside to break down the speech.

flickr user Gage Skidmore/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton made stops in Michigan this week to give their big economic speeches. 

Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas joined us today to talk about those speeches and how they might impact the presidential race.

Stateside 8.11.2016

Aug 12, 2016

Today, we look at the not-so-readily-apparent social costs of the Flint water crisis. And we learn how dark money groups try to influence your vote.

Courtesy of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network

It looks like dark money groups were hard at work trying to influence your vote during last week’s primary – particularly targeting Republicans running for the State House.

Craig Mauger heads up the Michigan Campaign Finance Network.

“This was an effort, a well-orchestrated effort, to keep extremely conservative candidates out of the House GOP caucus,” Mauger told us.

He sat down with us today to talk about what role these secret donors play, and why they’re so hard to identify.

Trump supporters at the Hillary Clinton speech in Warren.
Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Under the watchful eyes of several Warren police officers, about 40 Trump supporters gathered on one side of the street, near the building where Hillary Clinton gave a speech on her economic policies.

About 30 supporters of Clinton gathered on the other side.

“Lock her up!” chanted the Trump side. “Where’s your taxes?” chanted the Clinton side.

On the Trump side, Lisa Mankiewicz of Shelby Township is a true believer. She is sure Donald Trump will create jobs, and Hillary Clinton won’t.

According to Charley Ballard, the biggest difference between Trump and Clinton is their stance on immigration.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Millions of Americans would be put to work if Hillary Clinton is elected president. That was the promise the candidate delivered in Metro Detroit Thursday. Clinton said Republican nominee Donald Trump is presenting a dismal and incorrect picture of Michigan’s economy. She pushed pack at Trump’s economic plans while at an advanced manufacturing plant in Warren.

Flint city council President Kerry Nelson addresses the board overseeing Flint's transition out of receivership.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The panel in charge of Flint’s exit from state oversight says the city council isn't ready yet.

The Receivership Transition Advisory Board has extended the end of council’s probation period from October to December.

The board cites the council’s ongoing conflict with Flint’s mayor over a trash collection contract.

So often we hear people say, "Our immigration system is broken." But what exactly does that mean? 

In this State of Opportunity special, we hear answers to that question from various angles.

Stateside 8.10.2016

Aug 10, 2016

So often we hear people say, "Our immigration system is broken." But what exactly does that mean? In this State of Opportunity special, we hear answers to that question from various angles.

Hillary Clinton addressed the 2016 SEIU international convention in Detroit this May.
SEIU / via Twitter

Hillary Clinton will pitch her economic plan in Macomb County Thursday.

Clinton will speak at Futuramic Tool & Engineering, a Warren auto parts supplier that’s branched out into defense and aerospace.

It comes just days after Donald Trump shared his economic vision with the Detroit Economic Club.

It will be a very different crowd. In Warren, Clinton will try to win over some of Macomb County’s famed Reagan Democrats — white, blue-collar voters.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Doug Tribou talk about whether Donald Trump's fiscal strategy speech to the Detroit Economic Club on Monday will resonate with Michigan voters. Lessenberry and Tribou also discuss Hillary Clinton's upcoming visit and whether she'll take a sunnier view of the state's present and future. They also look at legal challenges to requirements for putting a question on the statewide ballot.


Stateside 8.9.2016

Aug 9, 2016

Today, we talk about Donald Trump's speech Monday night in Detroit. And, we learn about a treatment method that could help opioid addicts overcome pain.

Rashida Tlaid says Donald Trump's rhetoric has caused damage that will take years to address.
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Donald Trump came to Detroit to give a speech. For Michiganders opposed to Trump and what he stands for, it was a chance to speak back. 

Some 300 protestors gathered to chant outside Cobo Center as Trump spoke to the Detroit Economic Club. 

And nearly 20 women took their protest inside, interrupting Trump and eventually getting escorted outside by Secret Service. 

Among those kicked out of Monday's speech was former Democratic State Representative Rashida Tlaib, who was there as a part of Moms Against Trump.

A Flint water protest
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Marc Lamont Hill says we're in the midst of a war in America -- a war being waged on the vulnerable, the destitute, the struggling. Hill is a journalist and a political contributor to CNN.

Most often, he says, those vulnerable people are black, immigrant, LGBT and poor. Easily overlooked. Nobody. 

Marc Lamont Hill explores what life is like in 21st century America if you're nobody. 

Economist Charley Ballard said Trump's economic speech failed to address a modern economy.
Flickr user Gage Skidmore / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 


Donald Trump had the opportunity to lay out his economic vision for America at the Detroit Economic Club on Monday.

 

But his speech garnered criticism, including from Michigan State University economist Charley Ballard.

According to Chris Thomas, the "clunky" nature of the American election process actually lends to its security.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Russia has been accused of hacking into the emails of the Democratic National Committee. 

So, could Russia or some other country or group hack U.S. voting machines in some states in an attempt to change an election?

The answer, according to a group of determined computer scientists featured in a recent article by Ben Wofford of Politico, is yes.

Michigan’s Treasury Department deserves blame for its role in the Flint water crisis, according to a new report.
Flickr user Ian Freimuth / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

As the Flint water crisis unfolded, most of the blame was heaped upon the state departments of Environmental Quality and Health and Human Services.

But Wayne State University law professor Peter Hammer claims there’s another government agency at fault: Michigan’s treasury department. In a new report, Hammer faults Treasury for its willingness to bend rules when it came to the Karegnondi Water Authority (KWA) pipeline, and its indifference to whether the city could pay to upgrade treatment plants and guarantee safe drinking water.

Rashida Tlaid says Donald Trump's rhetoric has caused damage that will take years to address.
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Republican Donald Trump says that no business should pay more than 15% of income in taxes, and he's calling for a temporary moratorium on federal regulations.

In a speech at the Detroit Economic Club today, Trump also proposed allowing parents to fully deduct the average cost of childcare from their taxable income. The current Child and Dependent Care tax credit is capped at 35% of qualifying expenses or up to $3,000 for one cared-for individual or $6,000 for two or more.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are both coming to Michigan this week which begs the question: is Michigan in play come November?

flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Donald Trump is set to give what’s been billed as a “major economic policy speech” to the Detroit Economic Club today.

He’ll try to score points with a business-friendly audience that might be uncomfortable with some of his rhetoric, and his positions on issues like trade.

Marijuana plants.
user A7nubis / flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The campaign to legalize marijuana in Michigan says there’s still time to get the question on the November ballot. That was a core issue in the most recent briefs filed last week in the MI Legalize campaign’s challenge to an elections board decision that petition drive fell short in the required number of signatures.

I voted sticker
Michael Bentley / Creative Commons http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The state primary results are in, so what's to come in November? This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth discuss voter turnout and races to watch on the road to Election Day. They also talk about a resurrected plan to bring regional transit funding to southeast Michigan and a dispute over the state's emergency manager law that's playing out in federal court.


stevendepolo / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Some Detroit Public Schools debt has been downgraded again — this time, into junk territory.

The credit rating agency S&P Global lowered its rating on two sets of bonds, issued in 2011 and 2012. DPS still owes more than $200 million on them.

S&P says its concerns stems from district’s recent restructuring.

To avoid a potential bankruptcy, the state split DPS in two — with the “old co” existing only to re-pay historic debts with local tax revenues.

Stateside 8.5.2016

Aug 5, 2016

Today, we reflect on the life and career of Detroit musician Allan Barnes. And, we learn about the role Lake Michigan played in training WWII pilots.

Gov. Rick Snyder
gophouse.com

Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas​ joined us again today to talk about this week in politics. 

Primary voter turnout

Only 19% of all voters in Michigan showed up to vote in this past Tuesday's primary election, following a 34% turnout for the presidential primary earlier this year.

Demas described the low level of voter participation as “sadly predictable.”

According to John Philo, Michigan's emergency manager law "violates people's fundamental right to vote."
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

 

Michigan stripped the voting rights from people who live in Detroit, Flint, and other cities and school districts placed under emergency management.

That was a central argument today as opponents of the law took their legal challenge to the Sixth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in Cincinnati.  

Attorney John Philo says the law is also racist in the way it’s been applied.

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