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Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Over the weekend, Michigan Republicans chose a new member of the Republican National Committee to take the seat vacated when Terri Lynn Land stepped down to run for Carl Levin's Senate seat. 

The new member is someone with quite a Michigan-centric political pedigree.

Ronna Romney McDaniel is Mitt Romney's niece, and the granddaughter of Michigan's 43rd governor, George Romney. 

What does her election mean for Michigan's profile on the Republican National Committee? 

We're joined by Michigan Public Radio Network Lansing Bureau Chief, Rick Pluta. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan Republican officials have chosen the niece of GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney to replace Terri Lynn Land on the party's national committee.

Ronna Romney McDaniel was elected Saturday morning during a meeting of the 113-member Michigan Republican Party State Central Committee. McDaniel is the daughter of Ronna Romney, who also served on the Republican National Committee.

Land, Michigan's former secretary of state, resigned last month to focus on her run for the U.S. Senate. Her likely Democratic opponent is U.S. Rep. Gary Peters.

Governor Rick Snyder is hosting the 2014 North American International Summit.
michigan.gov

As a state Republican leader continues to roil his party with comments about gay people and Muslims, Gov. Rick Snyder used a Martin Luther King Day speech to call for more public civility.

“It’s disappointing that I had to make that call because of comments made by people out in the public,” he told a Martin Luther King Day lunch in Lansing. “And that just shows we need to continue this journey in terms of looking at equality and justice.”

The governor’s comments were yet another veiled reference to Michigan Republican National Committeeman Dave Agema.

Official legislative portrait

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - As the Republican National Committee prepares for meetings in Washington this week, Gov. Rick Snyder and other party leaders in Michigan are criticizing repeated anti-gay and anti-Muslim remarks by Committeeman Dave Agema.

The 64-year-old ex-state representative from western Michigan represents the state on the Republican party's national board.

Snyder made a semi-veiled reference to Agema in Thursday's State of the State speech, calling for civil discourse in the public arena.

Yesterday, a Republican National Committeeman, and former Michigan lawmaker, posted an article chock full of anti-gay slurs on Facebook. 

Dave Agema, the Committeeman who posted the article with a byline of "Frank Joseph, MD," has been asked to resign by 21 Republican precinct delegates and young Republican leaders. 

His response?

"Absolutely not."

The Republicans and Democrats have finished their national conventions, but now the party faithful have their state convention to attend.

Both major political parties are hosting state conventions in Michigan this weekend.

Republicans are meeting today and tomorrow in Grand Rapids, while the Democrats will meet in Lansing tomorrow and Sunday.

The conventions will formally nominate candidates for the Michigan Supreme Court, the State Board of Education and the governing boards for the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Wayne State University.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Michigan delegates are at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina this week. Michigan Radio’s Lester Graham is covering the event, and gave us his impressions about this year’s convention.

Graham said there’s some concern about whether there is enough enthusiasm to get the vote out for President Obama this year, as opposed to four years ago.

“Michigan Democrats seem to be convinced that if they can get the vote out, they’ll be doing fine, that Michigan will be a blue state again, and that Barack Obama will be re-elected as President,” he said.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

America’s two largest political showcase events could be hampered in their efforts to get out their messages because of Hurricane Isaac.

The Republicans have left Tampa and the Democrats are rolling into Charlotte.

This weekend should be filled with nothing but talk about what Mitt Romney said about Barack Obama and what the Democratic President plans to say about his Republican challenger.

Instead, Hurricane Isaac threatens to dilute both parties finely crafted convention messaging.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The Romney campaign says it plans to actively campaign In Michigan “until the end”.  But there is one major campaign component that Romney officials haven’t committed to yet.  Four years ago, the John McCain campaign pulled out of Michigan a month before the presidential election. State Republican leaders blamed that decision for hurting GOP turnout in Michigan in 2008.  Katie Gage says that won’t happen this year.  She’s a deputy director for the Romney campaign. Gage says the Romney campaign will be in Michigan “until the end”, with phone banks, local campaign offices and mailings.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The Republicans have wrapped up their convention in Tampa. Now hundreds of business people and lobbyists are boarding planes to join the Democrats in Charlotte for their national convention next week.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michiganders who watched Mitt Romney accept the Republican presidential nomination last night in Tampa say they were impressed by the way he did it.

Mitt Romney dedicated much of his acceptance speech last night to doing something he doesn’t do often: talking about his personal life.

Romney talked about his parents, his marriage, his children and his personal motivations, both in business and in faith.

Ronna Romney-McDaniel is Mitt’s niece.  She says she's glad voters are getting a chance to learn more about him as a person.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan native son Mitt Romney accepts the GOP presidential nomination this evening at the Republican National Convention.

Meanwhile, Wisconsin’s controversial governor gave Michigan’s delegates their marching orders today for the fall presidential campaign.

Wisconsin governor Scott Walker thanked Michigan Republicans for helping him defeat a recall campaign earlier this year.

Walker then urged the delegates to work just as hard to win their state for Mitt Romney in November…

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan’s delegates say they left the Republican National Convention last night with extra enthusiasm.

They say vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan set the right ‘tone’ for the fall campaign in his acceptance speech.

Michigan’s delegates liked hearing Paul Ryan attacking the ‘Affordable Care Act’ and President Obama’s economic and spending policies.

Tom Stroup is a delegate from Northfield Township.   He says the “tone” of Paul Ryan’s speech should connect with independent voters.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan’s U.S. Senate race is getting attention from top Congressional GOP leaders at the Republican National Convention.

“It’s not just carrying it for Mitt Romney…we need a new senator from Michigan as well,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told Michigan delegates this morning, “Because I would like to be setting the agenda in the Senate instead of (Democratic Senate Majority Leader) Harry Reid.”

McConnell told the delegates that Republican control of the U.S. Senate depends on Michigan.

cncphotos / flickr

Every Wednesday Christina Shockley talks to Michigan Radio's Political Analyst Jack Lessenberry about what is going on in state politics. This week they talk about the one-person jury that is investigating election rigging allegations involving  State Representative Roy Schmidt and Speaker of the House Jase Bolger. They also discuss the ballot campaigns that are now going to court to try to get on the November ballot, and what Michigan delegates are doing at the Republican Nation Convention.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan's female delegates to the Republican National Convention not surprisingly give high marks to Ann Romney for her speech last night.

Now the focus shifts to her husband Mitt, to see if he can build support among women voters.

Steve Carmody/ Michigan Radio

More than 100 thousand people voted for Ron Paul in Michigan’s Republican presidential primary in February.    But after what happened yesterday at the Republican National Convention, it appears some of them may not be voting Republican in November.

NJ Gov. Chris Christie at a Romney fundraiser in Michigan.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The man in the spotlight at the Republican National Convention tonight took his star power to the Michigan delegation this morning.

It’s a staple of every morning at national political conventions: the big name breakfast speaker.    And there are few bigger than New Jersey Governor Chris Christie.   The Garden State governor has a prime time slot tonight, delivering the convention’s keynote address. 

Christie told Michigan’s delegates about a conversation he had with Mitt Romney about the Republican nominee’s chance of winning New Jersey in November.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

A Michigan congressman in a tight re-election campaign will stand in the spotlight today at the Republican National Convention.

Republican Dan Benishek defeated Democrat Gary McDowell two years ago to win the congressional seat formerly held by Bart Stupak.   The two will face off again in a rematch in November.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan delegates to the Republican National Convention can find a lot to eat in Tampa.

But at least one business, not too far from the convention center, hopes those delegates will also want a small taste of home.

Tampa is hardly short of great uniquely Floridian food choices, from Cuban sandwiches in Ybor City to beachside shacks where you can eat a variety of fish that were swimming in the Gulf of Mexico a few hours before.

But sometimes you just want a coney.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Political shenanigans are nothing new at national political conventions.

But Michigan Democrats are the ones having fun today at Mitt Romney’s expense.

It started, as many things at a national political conventions do, with a press release.

But this press release had the eye catching title “Michigan GOP to Hold “No One’s Ever Asked to See My Birth Certificate” party.   The press release claimed the party was to show support for Mitt Romney, who raised the issue of President Obama’s birth certificate last Friday in Michigan.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

A new poll of likely Michigan voters shows Republican Mitt Romney has pulled even with President Barack Obama.   That news was greeted with cheers today at the Republican National Convention.

Michigan is often referred to as a ‘second tier’ swing state.  One that likely Mitt Romney will have trouble winning over to the Republican column.   But the new Mitchell Research poll of twelve hundred voters may change that perception.    The poll found 47 percent of likely Michigan voters back the president.   47 percent support his Republican challenger.  

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Retirees are expected to play a pivotal role in this fall’s election.

Republican Party leaders in Michigan and Florida are particularly interested in one unique set of voters - the so-called Snowbirds.

Snowbird is the term used for northern retirees who spend the winters in Florida.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

The chairman of Michigan’s Republican Party says he does not believe Tropical Storm Isaac will hamper the work that needs to get done at this week's national convention in Florida.

National party leaders canceled most events for the first day of the Republican National convention because of the threat of  Isaac.   They hope to get back on schedule tomorrow.

National Republican leaders are not ruling out the need to add an extra day to the schedule.

But Bob Schostak says he doubts that will be necessary.   Schostak is the chair of Michigan’s Republican Party.

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Isaac is coming, but for Michigan’s delegation to the Republican National Convention the parties go on.

They used to call them ‘Hurricane parties’.  People getting together to have a good time as one of nature’s most destructive forces bore down on them.   They can now change the name to 'Republican Hurricane Parties.'

As  Isaac churned its way north, Michigan’s delegation to the RNC went ahead and held their planned governor’s reception at the Florida Aquarium.   

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Tropical storm Isaac is bearing down on Florida.   But for now Michigan’s delegation to the Republican National Convention plans to keep to it’s pre-convention schedule.

Members of Michigan’s delegation had planned for a once in a lifetime experience in Tampa this week, but they didn’t expect it to be a hurricane. 

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan’s governor says he’s bringing his message of “relentless positive action” message to this week’s Republican National Convention.

“Positive” is not usually a word associated the rhetoric at national political conventions.

But Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, who’s made “relentless positive action” the mantra of his administration, hopes that’s not the case at the Republican National Convention which opens Monday in Tampa.