Stateside

Here you'll find individual interviews and segments from Michigan Radio's daily talkshow Stateside. To find the entire program, go here.

  • A recent legal case in Cass County, Michigan is raising questions about HIV disclosure laws in Michigan. We talk with Trevor Hoppe, sociologist of sexuality, HIV, and the law at the University at Albany-SUNY about the case.
  • State regulators want to find out where lead water pipes are and how many are left in the ground. Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith has been following the story and the results are posted in this handy map.
  • How a vibrant Flint neighborhood was leveled in the name of "urban renewal”. What can we learn from St. John Street in Flint?
In 2010, oil spilled into a creek near the Kalamazoo River from Enbridge Line 6b
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio


It was April of 2010 when Enbridge Line 6b ruptured, spilling more than a million gallons of Canadian heavy crude oil into a creek near Kalamazoo.

It was the largest inland spill in United States history.

That spill gave Michiganders a very good reason to sit up and pay closer attention to the nearly 3,300 miles of hazardous liquid pipelines that weave through our state, particularly Enbridge Line 5, which runs in the Straits of Mackinac.

Michigan Municipal League/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

    

Amid the torrent of headlines about Flint's water calamity, it's far too easy to lose track of the long history of that city.

There are powerful and poignant lessons to be learned in the way rich, vibrant neighborhoods were taken apart and plowed under in the name of "development.”

Communities like the old St. John Street neighborhood.

Charles Winfrey grew up in the St. John Street community. Today he is the executive director of The New McCree Theatre. He joined us today on Stateside

Listen to the full interview below.

flickr user Joe Gratz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0


A recent legal case in Cass County is raising questions about HIV disclosure laws in Michigan.

Trevor Hoppe is a sociologist who specializes in sexuality, HIV and the law. His research studies are titled Punishing Disease and he is co-editor of The War on Sex, a forthcoming collection of essays that examines the criminal regulation of sex.

Hoppe wrote a piece in the Huffington Post about an HIV-positive man in Cassopolis, MI, named Corey Rangel.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/9090732482

The Next Idea

Every year, the United States spends $218 billion growing, transporting, and processing food that no one ever eats. That's billion. The financial, resource, and environmental costs of all the wasted food in the United States is staggering. 

  • Traverse City wants to keep its small-town charms while at the same time drawing talent, growing the economy, accommodating population growth and addressing the lack of affordable housing. Traverse City Mayor Jim Carruthers joins us to talk about his city.
  • Writer Desiree Cooper's new book of short stories takes us right into the hearts of mothers, wives and daughters as she explores questions of race and gender.
Sunset over Traverse City
Jerry / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

How many times have you said this while you’ve been on vacation?

“I wish we could just live here all the time.”

As it turns out, among the thousands who have visited Traverse City over the last couple decades, many of them have said that. And followed through and made that wish come true. It’s becoming more than the National Cherry Festival and a fun place to spend a long weekend in the summer.

Wayne State University Press

Many women can relate to the witching hour. In the middle of the night, you wake up and have trouble falling back to sleep because your mind is racing. Concerns about the upcoming day, anxiety about the mounting to-do list while, oftentimes, your partner sleeps soundly next to you. The Witching Hour is the title of the first story in a collection of “flash fiction” – not short stories – by Detroit-based writer Desiree Cooper, titled Know The Mother.

Legos
Bill Ward / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea  

Instead of being the vehicle to join the middle class that it once was, higher education is now an obstacle that actually prevents access to knowledge and reinforces existing privilege. This was the powerful message of a compelling Economist cover story last year titled America’s New Aristocracy

A Detroit water shutoff notice for Haylard Management.
Ali Elisabeth / Michigan Radio

With all the attention paid to water issues in Michigan thanks to the Flint water crisis, the Detroit News highlighted another problem in the city of Detroit: water shutoffs.

Joel Kurth’s article begins with the following:

Thomas Xu / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Politicians and business leaders over the last decade have referenced the “brain drain” as a major problem for the state of Michigan. College students graduate from a state college or university and move elsewhere to pursue a job or begin their career.

  • There's a medical procedure called debridement, in which dead or contaminated tissue or foreign material is removed. That seems to be what's happening with this week's federal indictments of a dozen past and present Detroit Public School principals, among others. 
  • Nine of the 700 monarch butterflies released from the Toledo Zoo last year have been spotted in central Mexico
pixabay user lonaug / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

How can a Twitter username become a force for good?

Turns out it's not that hard when you have the name a huge company wants.

Studies show the Eastern Monarch Butterfly population has decreased by as much as 80% in the last decade.
flickr user Paul VanDerWerf / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Scientists continue to keep a nervous eye on North America’s eastern monarch butterfly population.

That population has dropped by more than 80% over the past decade.

A study published this week in the journal Scientific Reports suggests there’s a “substantial chance” that monarchs could become “quasi-extinct” within the next 20 years.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio


A funeral service is set for today for Curtis Hertel Sr. The former state Speaker of the House died suddenly this week of natural causes in his home.

The Democrat served in the state House for nearly two decades. Remarkably, during that time he wound up sharing the role of House Speaker with Republican Paul Hillegonds.

Amy Hunter is the Transgender Advocacy Project Coordinator for the ACLU of Michigan.
Cynthia Hunter

“I knew at a very young age that I was actually a woman.”

Those are the words of Amy Hunter. She is the Transgender Advocacy Project coordinator for the ACLU of Michigan ,and her story is one of the many in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) community that she represents.

  • We get both sides of the debate over the State Board of Education proposal to let transgender students use school bathrooms that match their gender identity.
  • The Yellow Dog River Community Forest Committee is raising money to preserve land along the Yellow Dog River in northern Marquette County.
  • There are only
Sen. Tom Casperson (R-Escanaba)
SenatorTomCasperson.com

The State Board of Education this month released a set of guidelines and recommendations it says will help provide a safer, more welcoming environment for students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ).

Isle Royale National Park

The National Park Service is taking a closer look at whether or not to bring more grey wolves to Isle Royale National Park. Only two wolves remain on the island now.

To help make its decision, the park service wants to hear from you. It’s accepting public comments on the question right now.

At one point, there were as many as 50 wolves on Isle Royale. But Phyllis Green, Superintendent of the Isle Royale National Park, says that number was abnormal.

Save The Wild UP / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A Michigan-based environmental organization is taking a new approach to protect a patch of land near the Yellow Dog River in northern Marquette County in the Upper Peninsula. The Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve started a crowd funding campaign to raise money to purchase the 695-acre property to protect it from development.

Emily Whittaker, the special projects manager at the Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve joined Stateside to talk about the Yellow Dog River Community Forest campaign and what makes the land so special.

  • Michigan Radio's Lansing Bureau Chief Rick Pluta was in Flint today, where state lawmakers investigating the Flint water crisis held a public hearing.
  • The recent report from the Flint Water Advisory Task Force made it clear: Michigan's emergency manager law contributed to this public health disaster and should be changed.
flickr user DryHundredFear / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

How do we break down stereotypes about each other?

That question has driven a Michigan State University journalism class to create a series of guides to help disassemble the myths and stereotypes about different groups in our country.

Bias Busters: Guides to Cultural Competence have been created by students. They're a series of questions and answers about African-Americans, East Asian cultures, Native Americans and more.

flickr user JMacPherson / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM


As ISIS claims responsibility for the deadly bombings in Brussels, it raises a serious question: How do news stories linking Muslims with terrorism impact the way we think of all Muslims?

University of Michigan assistant professor of communication Muniba Saleem and her fellow researchers wanted to find out. Their study is called Exposure to Muslims in Media and Support for Public Policy Harming Muslims.

A kayak on the Huron River
Deb Nystrom / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Ann Arbor Township and the city of Ann Arbor are both pushing for a federal cleanup of the dioxane plume that has been working its way through the city’s groundwater for several years. The concern is that the 1,4 dioxane, a known carcinogen, could eventually reach Ann Arbor’s main water source in the years to come.

  • David Carpenter, director of the Institute for Health and the Environment for the University at Albany in New York, explains what a Superfund site is and how winning that designation could help with the Pall-Gelman dioxane plume.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobthemagicdragon/7003917056

The Next Idea

Growing up in Chicago during the 1950s was a remarkably innocent experience for me. We lived in a bubble of post-WWII gratitude, and religious diversity meant only Christianity and Judaism. Tales like “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves” and “Aladdin and the Magic Carpet” were the closest I came to even hearing about Islam, which was called Mohammedanism then.

Atlantic Monthly Press (2002)

The literary world suffered a significant loss over the weekend when Michigan author and writer Jim Harrison passed away at the age of 78 at his home in Arizona.

Harrison wrote more than three dozen books, including novels like True North, Dalva, and numerous collections of poetry.

Gov. Rick Snyder
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There is an effort under way to recall Gov. Rick Snyder. Metro Detroit pastor David Bullock is leading the charge on one of the two petitions that are circulating around the state. Recalling a governor is no easy task and thanks to recent legislation, it is even more difficult.

Bullock will need to gather more than 790,000 valid signatures in 60 days. If they are successful with the effort, there is a great deal of confusion as to what the next steps would be.

The Flint Water Advisory Task Force presents the findings of its final report.
Screenshot from livestream

This week the Flint Water Advisory Task Force released its 116-page report.

Although Gov. Snyder appointed the task force, he and his administration were not spared in its frank findings.

At the formal release of the task force report, co-chair Chris Kolb singled out the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality as having, as the report said, “a degree of intransigence and belligerence that has no place in government.”

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