Education
9:52 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Flanagan: "The MEAP’s not an option" for next year

State Superintendent Mike Flanagan says the MEAP test is not an option at this point. He says changing now would cost the state.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

State Superintendent Mike Flanagan is warning Michigan lawmakers against trying to take a step back on school testing.

An amendment to next year’s school aid budget would require schools to give the MEAP exam next year. Some lawmakers are upset the state has contracted with a new company using a test tied to Common Core standards.

Flanagan says the MEAP test is not an option at this point. He says changing now would cost the state.

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Politics & Government
9:51 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Gov. Snyder and Senate leader not embracing Bolger’s union demands

Bolger's GOP colleagues are distancing themselves from the speaker's call for unions to contribute to Detroit's "grand bargain."
Credit Michigan Municipal League / Flickr

Republican leaders in Lansing are not joining House Speaker Jase Bolger’s calls for unions to contribute to Detroit’s bankruptcy settlement.

Gov. Rick Snyder and several foundations have signed off on a complicated deal to protect retiree pensions and artwork at the Detroit Institute of Arts. The state’s contribution to the so-called “grand bargain” would be about $350 million, and state lawmakers would have to approve that money.

Bolger, R-Marshall, says it’s only fair for unions to contribute to the deal as well.

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Environment & Science
5:38 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Census shows fewer wolves in Michigan's Upper Peninsula

The DNR claims there are 636 wolves roaming the U.P. That’s down from 658 in 2013.
Credit USFWS Midwest

There are fewer wolves living in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

State wildlife biologists report a slight dip in the wolf population following last fall’s controversial hunt.

The Department of Natural Resources has just completed a census of wolves in the Upper Peninsula. The DNR admits the count is more of an estimate than an accurate head count.

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Environment & Science
5:37 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Lester Graham's upcoming documentary, "Growing up in Poverty and Pollution"

Brianna Allgood gets a checkup on her asthma.
Credit Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Children growing up in poverty face huge challenges. One challenge that might not come to the top of the mind, though, is pollution.

As part of Michigan Radio's State of Opportunity project, reporter Lester Graham spent the past three months exploring the problem.

His documentary, "Growing up in Poverty and Pollution," will air tomorrow at 3 p.m. on Michigan Radio.

Lester joined us today to talk about his project.

*Listen to the audio above.

Stateside
5:35 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Stryker of the Detroit Free Press talks DIA art and bankruptcy

Detroit Institute of Arts
Credit Photo courtesy of the DIA

As Detroit's bankruptcy battle continues to unfold, a question remains: what will happen to the city-owned pieces at the Detroit Institute of Arts?

The city recently reached a tentative agreement with its retirees and pensioners. Could the agreements impact the possible sale of DIA work to satisfy Detroit's bondholders and other creditors?

Mark Stryker explored that question in The Detroit Free Press and we spoke with him today.

*Listen to the audio above.

Stateside
5:34 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

State legislators debate expanding state's controversial Education Achievement Authority

Credit David Schott / Flickr

Michigan Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville says he hopes there will be a final vote this week on a bill to expand the state’s controversial Education Achievement Authority.

That’s the state-run authority meant to turn around some of Michigan’s lowest-performing schools. Right now, the EAA runs 15 schools in Detroit. The bill would pave the way for it to expand up to 50 schools statewide.

Michigan Public Radio Network’s Lansing reporter Jake Neher joined us to talk about the EAA.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:33 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Is the glass half-empty or half-full for Michigan's business owners?

Off to work!
Credit Kenny Louie / Flickr

How are business owners in Michigan feeling?

It's an important question: Those business owners are doing the hiring – or not.

The 2014 Chase Business Leaders Outlook has just been released. It contains the views of some 3,500 leaders of small and mid-sized businesses.

Here to give us the views of these business leaders is Jim Glassman, senior economist with JPMorgan, Chase & Company.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:32 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Detroit watches as Delaware Art Museum sells pieces to repay debts

The Rivera court in the Detroit Institute of Arts.
Credit Maia C/Flickr

The reality of worried creditors eyeing the treasures at the DIA has the museum world watching very closely.

There are few people who want to see the museum's art leave Detroit.

But in the face of monstrous debt, should it be a case of "hands off the art"?

Recently, the Delaware Art Museum announced it had decided, "with heavy hearts, but clear minds" to sell up to four works from its collection to repay debt from an expansion and thus, keep its door open.

We wanted to get a museum expert's view in this debate, so we welcomed the director of the University of Michigan's Museum Studies Program, Ray Silverman.

Listen to the full interview.

Stateside
5:31 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Filmmakers will capture "one day in Detroit" this Saturday

Screen shot from a "One Day" film.
Credit onedayindetroit.org

On Saturday, hundreds of folks with cameras in hand will descend upon Detroit.

Their mission is to document stories that most affect the future of the city. The stories they capture will become part of a TV series on the future of the American city.

It's called “One Day in Detroit: Your Day, Your City, Your Future.”

Detroit is one of 11 cities across America to be a part of this "One Day" event.

The co-founder and executive producer of One Day on Earth, Brandon Litman, joined us today. And we also welcomed Stephen McGee, the local producer of “One Day in Detroit.”

*Listen to the audio above.

Education
5:04 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Benton Harbor schools in danger of not making payroll, state reopens financial review

Benton Harbor High School (file photo)
Credit Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Benton Harbor Area Schools has been running a deficit since 2007. A review in 2011 found financial stress, but the district was in the middle of making changes to save money. No emergency manager was appointed under a previous version of the law.

But State Superintendent Mike Flanagan says BHAS isn’t making enough progress on the deficit.

The deficit is $14.7 million. For perspective, its revenues this year were $31.8 million.

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Investigative
3:34 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Lead poisoning is still damaging Michigan kids

Decades of lead paint can deteriorate, leaving lead dust or paint chips on the floor. Lead tastes sweet to children.
Credit Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

There‘s one kind of pollution that researchers believe robs kids of their future like no other.

Scientists have found evidence it diminishes their intelligence, causes behavioral problems, even increases the likelihood they’ll end up in prison.

This toxin’s damage is known.

We even know how to protect children from being exposed to it.

Yet tens of thousands of Michigan children are poisoned by lead every day.

Jessica Jeffries showed me the work that was done on her upper-floor apartment of a two-story house in Detroit.

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Station news
1:57 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Michigan Radio wins regional Edward R. Murrow Awards

Michigan Radio has been recognized with two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards in the large market radio category. The Murrow Awards are presented by The Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) to honor outstanding achievements in electronic journalism.

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Offbeat
1:29 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Michigan man goes for "most strikes in a minute" bowling record

Jason Hicks going for his ninth strike.
Credit Amber Taylor / YouTube

We're talking the traditional, pitcher-of-beer, middle America, tenpin bowling.

Chad McClean set the official record in Gainesville, Florida last year. He managed 12 strikes in one minute.

Unofficially, Jason Hicks tied that record at his family-owned Clio Bowling Arcade last month. MLive's Aaron McMann says Hicks actually hit a 13th strike, but it was a second too late.

Here's a video of his last attempt:

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Education
1:19 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Student demand change to Michigan school 'zero tolerance' policies

Dozens of high school students have completed a trek from Detroit to Lansing to highlight their concern about ‘zero tolerance’ policies in Michigan schools.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Dozens of high school students have completed a trek from Detroit to Lansing to highlight their concern about ‘zero tolerance’ policies in Michigan schools.

The students say violating even minor ‘zero tolerance’ policies may land them on suspension.

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Environment & Science
12:32 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

'Poor soil and a short growing season': How U.P. farmers are building a new ag. industry

Harvesting over winter spinach in a hoop house.
Shawn Malone UP Second Wave

With its rocky soil, thick forests and painfully short growing season, the Upper Peninsula is never going to look like Iowa or Kansas – and that's okay. For more than a century, a hardy batch of growers and livestock farmers have managed to survive and prosper in these less-than-ideal conditions. Thanks to new technologies and some decidedly low-tech solutions, the U.P.'s latest generation of ag workers are more productive than ever. Ultimately, the fruits of their labor may be felt – and tasted – far beyond the region's borders.

Age-Old Limitations
If you're a U.P. native, you don't need an advanced degree to understand why agriculture is challenging here. But Alger County MSU Extension Director Jim Isleib has one, so people tend to listen to his thoughts on this issue. "Poor soils and a short growing season – that about sums it up," he says. 

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Opinion
10:46 am
Wed April 23, 2014

One way U of M could use racial preferences in admissions

As pretty much everyone knows by now, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on the use of affirmative action in college admissions. This was no real surprise.

Today, lots of people are praising or attacking this decision. But it is clear to me that many of them haven’t read it, or even read much about it. And the high court’s ruling raises two very interesting questions on subjects other than affirmative action.

First of all, it is important to understand that the court did not say affirmative action couldn’t be used in college admissions. Not at all.

In fact, in his majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy said “the consideration of race in admissions is permissible.” But Michigan voters eight years ago chose to ban the use of race in college admissions. Justice Kennedy wrote that the court found they were within their rights to “choose to prohibit the consideration of racial preferences in governmental decisions, in particular with respect to school admissions.”

However, Kennedy also said that voters could decide that “race-based preferences could be adopted.”  

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Education
10:35 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Michigan girls encouraged to become "digital divas"

Studies show that many girls lose interest in technology by the time they reach high school, a trend that Eastern Michigan University and its partners in the 4th annual "Digital Divas" conference are working to combat.
Credit gracey/morguefile.com

Hundreds of girls from across Michigan will have the chance to try out some hot technology this week in the hopes they see a fit for themselves in a high-tech career. Eastern Michigan University will host the fourth annual "Digital Divas" conference on Friday.

EMU Program Manager Bia Hamed says the free one-day event for middle and high school girls aims to help close the gender gap when it comes to careers in science, math, engineering and technology-related fields, often referred to as "STEM."

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9:57 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Too many foster kids eligible for health care rely on "prayer insurance"

Lead in text: 
State of Opportunity's new service, Infowire, looks at why so many young people who've aged out of foster care don't know they're eligible for health care. Foster care advocates are trying to get the word out. Do you know a young person who needs this information? Send them over to State of Opportunity and get them hooked up with the Infowire.
If you aged out of the foster care system you can get free health insurance until age 26.
Politics & Government
9:06 am
Wed April 23, 2014

The week in Michigan politics: Affirmative action and GM

Credit US Supreme Court

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Christina Shockley discuss the U.S. Supreme Court decision on affirmative action, and the latest reactions by GM after the fallout from recalls for ignition switch problems.

Week in Michigan Politics interview for 4/23/14

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Politics & Government
6:33 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Saginaw postpones LGBT discrimination ban

Saginaw city council is delaying a vote on an LGBT discrimination ban.
Credit user Marlith / Flickr

Saginaw is putting off a decision about whether to have a citywide ban on discrimination based 

on sexual orientation or gender identity.  

The Saginaw Council chambers were packed to capacity, according to the Associated Press. 

But the council voted not to make a decision just yet. A few members said they wanted time to talk with the city's business and religious community.

But Councilwoman Annie Boensch says she thinks churches will support it, once they understand they're exempted from the ban.

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