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Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

Are we thinking about teacher pay all wrong?

Nearly every school district in the nation uses the same type of salary schedule to pay its teachers -- a schedule with "steps" and "lanes" that pays based on years in the classroom, and you automatically get paid more if you have a master's degree or higher.

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Artist rendering of proposed Lansing casino.
Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians

Plans for new tribal casinos in downtown Lansing and Romulus have hit a roadblock.

The U.S. Department of the Interior has turned down a request from the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians to take land in Lansing and Romulus into trust. 

Federal officials denied the request because the application failed to show how acquiring this land would “consolidate or enhance” tribal lands. 

Downtown Detroit
flickr user Tim Wang / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The city of Detroit has been losing population for decades, but that could soon change.

Southeast Michigan is expected to gain approximately 380,000 households by 2040, according to a new report from the Urban Institute.

Forty years ago, I was in a special, high-pressure graduate program at the University of Michigan designed to make trained journalists out of otherwise hapless intellectuals like myself in a year and a half. It was an amazingly successful program.

Many of my classmates went on to jobs in senior management in places like both the New York and Los Angeles Times and the former International Herald Tribune.

cash
Public Domain

Governor Rick Snyder has signed bills to create new business incentives in hopes of luring some very large employers to Michigan.

Snyder signed the three-bill package just hours before Foxconn, a major objective of Michigan economic development officials, announced its first U.S. plant would locate in Wisconsin. But state officials say Foxconn is not the only big company scouting for new U.S. locations.

Courtesy of the Detroit Health Department

Detroit activists are highlighting what they say is a growing public health crisis. Today they brought in medical experts from outside the city to discuss the potential health implications of mass water shutoffs in Detroit. They want a moratorium.

“There’s no question that access to safe and clean water from a health perspective is a top priority,” Detroit’s top health officer, Dr. Joneigh Khaldun said.

The "Pure Michigan" campaign highlights beautiful and memorable places and experiences in Michigan.
user PunkToad / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The multi-million dollar Pure Michigan campaign is getting an evaluation. The state auditor general started a review this week.

Representatives Steven Johnson, R-Wayland and Martin Howrylak, R-Troy, asked for the audit. Johnson said he wants to make sure the campaign is a good deal for taxpayers.

“I like the ads, too. I think they’re, you know, they’re nice to see on TV. They make me feel good about Michigan,” he said. “But it’s millions of dollars that we’re spending and that money doesn’t come from nowhere. That comes from the hardworking taxpayers of Michigan.”

Courtesy of the Archives of Michigan

It’s recognized as the Snow Capital of the Midwest. That’s quite a distinction for a town that no longer exists.

Rachel Clark from the Michigan History Center joined Stateside to explain how the mining town of Delaware, Michigan became a ghost town.

Water running from tap
jordanmrcai / Creative Commons

Detroit is in the midst of turning off the water at homes with unpaid utility bills. Meanwhile, Philadelphia – another major city struggling with water affordability – recently launched a program allowing low-income residents to pay for water based on income, not usage. Philadelphia is the first city in the nation to enact such a program.

According to Peter Hammer, Wayne State University law professor and Director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights, Detroit activists came up with a similar water-affordability plan in 2003 that never gained political traction.

Ali Elisabeth / Michigan Radio

 


Last year, more than 27,000 Detroit homes had water shut off because of what the city says were unpaid bills. In some neighborhoods, one in five homes lost water access.

In 2014, the cash-strapped city started getting tough on people who couldn’t keep up with paying for water. City officials predicted the shutoffs would taper off as residents got on payment plans and bills started being paid, but Bridge Magazine reports residential shutoffs last year rose 18% over the previous year.

Matthias Gutjahr / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 


Michigan has been in fierce competition with other Midwest states to lure in Taiwanese electronics manufacturing giant Foxconn. The company had announced intentions to build a massive plant in the United States but didn’t immediately specify where, launching a tax incentive bidding war among the contending states.

Dustin Walsh, a senior reporter at Crain’s Detroit Business, told Stateside President Donald Trump is expected to announce today that new plant will go to Wisconsin. But Michigan may yet get a "runner-up prize,” with Foxconn planning to announce more investments in other states.

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Looking Back at Detroit 1967

A Look at Teacher Pay in Michigan

A deep dive look at how we go about paying teachers in Michigan