Politics & Government
6:33 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Saginaw postpones LGBT discrimination ban

Saginaw is the latest city to consider adding a ban on LGBT discrimination to their city's laws.
user Marlith Flickr

Saginaw is putting off a decision about whether to have a citywide ban on discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.  The Saginaw Council chambers were packed to capacity, according to the Associated Press.  But the council voted not to make a decision just yet.

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Offbeat
5:52 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Humane Society asks Michigan drivers to watch out for turtles

Caution: Turtle Crossing
Credit Humane Society of Huron Valley / Facebook

Why did the turtle cross the road? The answer is that it is just that time of the year again. Michigan's turtles are hitting the roads to go and lay their eggs on the other side.

The Humane Society of Huron Valley is urging drivers to keep on the look out for these little guys making their way across our roads, and to avoid them as safely as possible. If the mood strikes you, get out and nudge them in the direction that they are headed. 

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Transportation
5:11 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Doggy bathroom is the newest, cutest fixture of Metro Airport

Service animal relief area at Detroit Metropolitan Airport
Credit Wayne County Airport Authority

Humans are not the only ones in the airport who need a restroom between flights. That's why Delta Airlines and Detroit Metropolitan Airport today opened the hub's first relief area for service animals.

Nicknamed "Central Bark" by some airport staff,  the area has two grassy sections called "porch potties," with a sprinkler system to wash away waste. It even has a fake fire hydrant.

It means passengers in transit will not have to take their service dogs outside to do their business.

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Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

What can Finnish moths tell us about climate change?

Mark Hunter
Credit webapps.lsa.umich.edu/

Today marks the 44th anniversary of Earth Day. Many consider April 22, 1970 to be the birth of the modern environmental movement.

At that time, Earth Day organizers had an advantage: The environmental problems were highly visible, tangible problems that people came up against in their daily lives, such as toxic effluent from factories spilled into streams and rivers. Kids couldn't swim in lakes and rivers because they were too polluted.  Parks and highways were strewn with trash and air pollution made people sick.

You could draw a direct connection between these problems and the need for environmental action to improve the quality of life for everyone.

Many of today's biggest environmental concerns seem more abstract even though they are perhaps even more threatening than the burning river in Cleveland. Global warming is one example.

That's why a study by our next guest caught our eye. He found that what is happening to moths in Finnish Lapland suggests that we're underestimating the impacts of climate change because much of the harm is hidden from view.

Mark Hunter is a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Michigan, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

U.S. Supreme Court upholds Michigan's affirmative action ban in college admissions

Credit U.S. Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on race- and gender-based affirmative action in college admissions today.

A six-to-two majority on the Court held that Michigan voters were within their rights to amend the state constitution to ban the admission policies.

Rick Pluta is Lansing bureau chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:06 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Will state lawmakers approve the Detroit bankruptcy "grand bargain?"

Credit Peter Martorano / Flickr

It's taken months of bargaining, bickering and posturing, but there have been promising advances in the Detroit bankruptcy journey.

Pieces are starting to fall into place that could complete the so-called "grand bargain" that would protect the DIA collection and soften the blow for Detroit's retirees.

First came word of a tentative deal between the city and its pensioners. A day later, the board that represents police and fire retirees gave a unanimous approval to the deal.

Now it's on to the next hurdle: getting state lawmakers to approve Michigan's share of the grand bargain –$350 million.

Chris Gautz, Capitol Correspondent of Crain's Detroit Business, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:05 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Detroit Big Three ruled the 1964 World's Fair; what's changed in the last 50 years?

Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World's Fair and the Transformation of America.
Credit Twitter

The 1964 World's Fair opened its door to an eager public 50 years ago this day at the Flushing Meadows Corona Park, in New York City.

And it is no exaggeration to say that cars ruled that World's Fair. Detroit's Big Three worked very hard to grab the world's attention.

We talk about what those messages were and how the Detroit Three weren't just selling cars, they were pushing a lifestyle and a political system.

Joseph Tirella, author of Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World's Fair and the Transformation of America, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:05 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Mark Fields to take the place of Alan Mulally as Ford CEO

Alan Mulally
Credit Ford Motor Company

All signs point to a big change at Ford Motor Company.

Although the automaker has not made an official announcement, there is much speculation today that CEO Alan Mulally is reportedly ready to retire before the year is out and COO Mark Fields will ascend to the top spot.

Michigan Radio's auto reporter Tracy Samilton joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
2:59 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Lansing Police Department moving to temporary home

Mayor Virg Bernero announced today the city will spend about a million dollars to renovate and lease part of the Hill Center on the city’s south side.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The bulk of the Lansing Police Department will move into a temporary home this summer.

Mayor Virg Bernero announced today the city will spend about $1 million to renovate and lease part of the Hill Center on the city’s south side.

The city’s current lease at the Motor Wheel complex on the city’s north side expires in August. Lansing has leased that space for more than a decade.

The new lease is only for four years.

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Auto
2:31 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

GM restructuring engineering in response to recall

Credit John F. Martin / Creative Commons

DETROIT – General Motors is adding 35 product safety investigators as part of a larger restructuring in response to a series of safety recalls.

GM says the new investigators will more than double the size of its current team, to 55.

The company is also dividing its global vehicle engineering organization into two sections. A product integrity section will oversee vehicle and engine engineering as well as safety, while a separate department will oversee parts engineering and advanced vehicle development.

GM's product development chief Mark Reuss says the changes were made to ensure that potential problems are spotted and handled more quickly.

The government is investigating why it took GM more than a decade to recall small cars with a defective ignition switch.

The Environment Report
2:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Students celebrate Earth Day by planting sequoia clones

Thousands of cuttings from ancient redwoods grow in a mist chamber at Archangel Ancient Tree Archive in Copemish, Michigan.
Sara Hoover Interlochen Public Radio

Listen to today's Environment Report above.

Students in northern Michigan are planting clones of ancient sequoias today.

There's a grove of sequoias along the shores of Lake Michigan on the site of a former Morton Salt factory.

Sequoia trees are not native to Michigan, but this grove has grown in Manistee for more than 65 years when they were brought here from the West Coast. Now, those trees are going to take another trip, or their clones will.

Students who attend Interlochen Arts Academy are planting them on campus along Green Lake. The clones are from Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.

David Milarch is the group's co-founder. He says they’re planting clones of redwoods around the world today.

“Ninety-six percent of all of our redwoods have been cut down, butchered and sold,” Milarch says.

Here's a look at how the group collects genetic material from these old growth trees:

Both the Interlochen Center for the Arts and nearby Interlochen State Park have lost many trees recently due to disease and bug infestation.

Head park ranger Chris Stark has mixed feelings about the planting. He'd prefer to plant native varieties, such as the white pine.

Arts & Culture
1:13 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

The return of Artpod!

Yo Yo Ma is pumped for more Artpod.
Credit Dave Trumpie

It's been a long, stupidly cold and soul-killing winter. 

Few people know that Artpod cannot survive until we've had at least three days above 70 degrees.

So it's only now that Artpod can emerge from hibernation,  much the way men's feet are unfortunately baring themselves to the world in flip flops again.  

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Economy
11:59 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Unemployment down, but workers making less money in Grand Rapids

Credit Sheila Steele / Creative Commons

The unemployment rate in Grand Rapids is back where it was before the Great Recession.

But workers in Michigan’s second-largest labor market are making less money. Grand Rapids had the second-worst earnings decline of the top-100 labor markets in the country since 2001, down 6.6%. Only Detroit was worse at 7.2%.

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Opinion
11:55 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Sound and fury over Detroit teen's U of M rejection misses the real point

Brooke Kimbrough is easy to pick on – and a lot of the establishment, including the media, is happily doing so. Brooke is a frustrated high school senior who didn’t get accepted into the school of her choice – the University of Michigan. She apparently always took it for granted that she would get in.

The fact that she didn’t actually means she is in the majority. Two-thirds of high school seniors applying to U of M are rejected.

Kimbrough, who goes to one of the best charter schools in Detroit, is an impressive student. She’s a member of the debate team, and a youth leadership program.

Her grade point average is a respectable 3.5. But these days the average Michigan freshman’s average is 3.8. Brooke’s ACT scores are even further behind most successful applicants. So she was, sadly, rejected – though the university encouraged her to do well elsewhere and apply for admittance as a sophomore.

But Brooke isn’t willing to take no for an answer – and has decided to make this all about race. Seventeen-year-olds are often all about exaggerated rhetoric, and she is a prize-winning debater.

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Breaking
10:43 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Michigan's ban on affirmative action in college admissions upheld by U.S. Supreme Court

Credit Credit David Jesse @freephighered / Twitter

The U.S. Supreme Court released its ruling this morning in favor of Michigan's 2006 constitutional ban on using affirmative action in college admissions.

Six justices ruled in favor of Michigan's ban, but for different reasons. Justices Sotomayor and Ginsberg dissented, and Justice Kagan recused herself from the case.

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The Environment Report
8:50 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Explore a century-old freighter, "dive" on a shipwreck at new Great Lakes museum

The National Museum of the Great Lakes. It cost $12 million to build, with the vast majority of the money coming from public sources.
Rebecca Williams Michigan Radio

You can listen to today's Environment Report above (the museum story starts a minute in).

I thought I knew a lot about the Great Lakes, until I met Chris Gillcrist. He’s the kind of guy you want on your Trivial Pursuit team.

This is the kind of fact I learned from him every few minutes:

“The first millionaire in American history is John Jacob Astor. It’s a guy trading beaver pelts from the Great Lakes and sending them to Europe.”

Gillcrist is the executive director of the new National Museum of the Great Lakes. It opens this Saturday, April 26, in Toledo.

There are a lot about shipwrecks here, sure,  but Gillcrist wants you to know it’s much more than that.

“We look at it as retrofitting American history to more accurately depict how the Great Lakes impacted the nation as a whole over the past 300 years,” he says.

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Education
7:22 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Muskegon Heights charter board president: Schools will stay open, “That’s a promise.”

Muskegon Heights Public School Academy school board; from left to right Arthur Scott, Carmella Ealom and Darryl Todd (file photo)
Credit Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Muskegon Heights' charter school board acknowledged at a meeting Monday night it doesn’t know how it’ll fund operations for the rest of this school year. But it is reassuring the community it’ll figure something out by next week at the latest.

“As soon as we have something I will share it with you. That’s a promise,” Muskegon Heights Academy’s school board president Arthur Scott said.

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Education
5:27 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Poll says Michigan voters want to increase K-12 per-pupil spending

Michigan Capitol
Credit Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Three-quarters of Michigan voters support a state school budget proposal that increases per-pupil funding and gives local schools more control over how they spend the money.

That's according to a recent poll commissioned by the group that came up with the proposal.

The Classroom & Kids Coalition is made up of educators, administrators, and local school boards.

Its proposal would increase the per-pupil grant by $250-$291 by cutting $186 million from other parts of the School Aid Fund. (Gov. Snyder's proposal would increase the per-pupil grant by $167.)

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Stateside
5:03 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Michigan builder provides tips on keeping your basement dry

Bricks covering the window didn't work. What will keep the water out?
Credit user courtney / Flickr

Now that spring is here, and the warmer temps are chasing away the last traces of the heavy snowfall, homeowners around the state are keeping wary eyes on their basements, worried about flooding.

Ronald Gay knows a thing or two about flooding and Michigan basements.

He's a builder, a former home inspector in Oakland County, and his new book is "5 Steps to a Dry Basement or Crawl Space.”

*Listen to our interview with him above.

Stateside
5:03 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

How will Michigan's elections be influenced by the latest U.S. Supreme Court decision?

Credit U.S. Supreme Court

When the U.S. Supreme Court recently handed down its 5-4 decision in McCutcheon vs.

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