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Auchter's Art: A thank you note to Flint

ARTIST'S POV: After three years of the Flint water crisis, fatigue has set in — first and foremost, for the citizens of Flint who have had to live with the daily grind and persistent worries. But also for Michiganders living outside and looking in.

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bertozland / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The first mammal cloned by scientists was Dolly the Sheep, in 1997. There were concerns at the time about Dolly because the cell used to clone her was from a six year old sheep. Dolly died young. The conclusion at the time was that Dolly more or less was born at six years of age – the same age as the cell.

But cloning research has continued since the announcement of Dolly in 1997.

Laura Nawrocik / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Three years ago, not long after the city of Flint switched its water source to the Flint River, residents began to complain about the quality of the water coming into their homes.

The State of Michigan, however, denied the problem for a long time. It wasn’t until activists and news media proved there was a problem that the state finally did something.

This week, the state Senate passed a supplemental appropriations bill which included federal dollars for Flint. Stateside’s Lester Graham spoke with Arlan Meekhof, the Republican Majority Leader of the Senate, about that bill, and the future of funding for Flint.

Three years after the anniversary of Flint switching their water source over to the Flint River, which led to the water crisis, the Michigan Legislature has taken very little action to prevent a similar situation from happening elsewhere.
Pkay Chelle / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The weekly political roundup on Stateside tackles a few of the biggest stories of the week. Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and a former Republican legislative leader, along with Vicki Barnett, former mayor of Farmington Hills and a former Democratic legislator, joined the show to break it all down.

flickr user vasenka / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 


It's graduation season at the University of Michigan. 

This year, the university celebrates its bicentennial. That means the public university was established in Michigan 20 years before Michigan was a state.

flickr user visionsofgrace / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

In some schools in Michigan, being a lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, or questioning high school student is welcomed and embraced. In other schools, LGBTQ kids have to stay in the closet or endure a backlash from homophobic students, or even teachers and administrators. 

Photos courtesy of VOTEBUSUITOWSU.COM and Renee White

After the 2016 Election, we talked to a few Donald Trump supporters and asked about their vote. With the first 100 days of the Trump presidency just around the corner, Stateside reached out to a couple of those Trump supporters to get their thoughts on his performance as Commander in Chief so far.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The next stop in our Artisans of Michigan series is on a residential street in Highland Park, a city that’s within the City of Detroit.

Celeste Smith is using a small hammer to tack down fabric that’s been soaked in a stiffening agent. She’s making a hat. A fancy one for ladies planning to attend a big hat-wearing event.

“I’m getting ready for the Derby,” she says. Smith has been up all night to keep up with demand. “They’re having the Detroit Derby Day here and I also have some clients going to Louisville,” she said. Big fancy hats are a tradition at the Kentucky Derby.

Three days ago, the Michigan Civil Rights Commission asked the highest court in the land to decide whether our state’s emergency manager law is unconstitutional.

Specifically, the issue is whether the law violates the federal Voting Rights Act by lessening the voting power of minorities. Nearly all the cities and school districts where emergency managers have been appointed had black majority populations.

JOHN AUCHTER / AUCHTOON.COM

ARTIST'S POV: After three years of the Flint water crisis, fatigue has set in — first and foremost, for the citizens of Flint who have had to live with the daily grind and persistent worries. But also for Michiganders living outside and looking in. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mel_Pearson

This week, the University of Michigan did something it hasn’t had to do in 33 years: hire a new hockey coach.

The last time the job opened was 1984. Athletic director Don Canham heard Red Berenson was on campus moving his oldest son, Gordie, into his dorm room. Canham called Berenson to his office, offered him the job for the third time, and Berenson finally took it.

If he hadn’t, it’s not clear who Canham could have hired. After all, the guy Michigan just fired was a failed former high school hockey coach. Michigan was at the bottom of a glorified bus league, with an empty building, and nothing to brag about.

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