Station news
1:57 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Michigan Radio Wins Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards

Michigan Radio has been recognized with two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards in the Large Market Radio category. The Murrow Awards are presented by The Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) to honor outstanding achievements in electronic journalism.

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Offbeat
1:29 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Michigan man goes for "most strikes in a minute" bowling record

Jason Hicks going for his ninth strike.
Credit Amber Taylor / YouTube

We're talking the traditional, pitcher-of-beer, middle America, tenpin bowling.

Chad McClean set the official record in Gainesville, Florida last year. He managed 12 strikes in one minute.

Unofficially, Jason Hicks tied that record at his family-owned Clio Bowling Arcade last month. MLive's Aaron McMann says Hicks actually hit a 13th strike, but it was a second too late.

Here's a video of his last attempt:

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Education
1:19 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Student demand change to Michigan school 'zero tolerance' policies

Dozens of high school students have completed a trek from Detroit to Lansing to highlight their concern about ‘zero tolerance’ policies in Michigan schools.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Dozens of high school students have completed a trek from Detroit to Lansing to highlight their concern about ‘zero tolerance’ policies in Michigan schools.

The students say violating even minor ‘zero tolerance’ policies may land them on suspension.

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Environment & Science
12:32 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

'Poor soil and a short growing season': How U.P. farmers are building a new ag. industry

Harvesting over winter spinach in a hoop house.
Shawn Malone UP Second Wave

With its rocky soil, thick forests and painfully short growing season, the Upper Peninsula is never going to look like Iowa or Kansas – and that's okay. For more than a century, a hardy batch of growers and livestock farmers have managed to survive and prosper in these less-than-ideal conditions. Thanks to new technologies and some decidedly low-tech solutions, the U.P.'s latest generation of ag workers are more productive than ever. Ultimately, the fruits of their labor may be felt – and tasted – far beyond the region's borders.

Age-Old Limitations
If you're a U.P. native, you don't need an advanced degree to understand why agriculture is challenging here. But Alger County MSU Extension Director Jim Isleib has one, so people tend to listen to his thoughts on this issue. "Poor soils and a short growing season – that about sums it up," he says. 

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Opinion
10:46 am
Wed April 23, 2014

One way U of M could use racial preferences in admissions

As pretty much everyone knows by now, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on the use of affirmative action in college admissions. This was no real surprise.

Today, lots of people are praising or attacking this decision. But it is clear to me that many of them haven’t read it, or even read much about it. And the high court’s ruling raises two very interesting questions on subjects other than affirmative action.

First of all, it is important to understand that the court did not say affirmative action couldn’t be used in college admissions. Not at all.

In fact, in his majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy said “the consideration of race in admissions is permissible.” But Michigan voters eight years ago chose to ban the use of race in college admissions. Justice Kennedy wrote that the court found they were within their rights to “choose to prohibit the consideration of racial preferences in governmental decisions, in particular with respect to school admissions.”

However, Kennedy also said that voters could decide that “race-based preferences could be adopted.”  

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Education
10:35 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Michigan girls encouraged to become "digital divas"

Studies show that many girls lose interest in technology by the time they reach high school, a trend that Eastern Michigan University and its partners in the 4th annual "Digital Divas" conference are working to combat.
Credit gracey/morguefile.com

Hundreds of girls from across Michigan will have the chance to try out some hot technology this week in the hopes they see a fit for themselves in a high-tech career. Eastern Michigan University will host the fourth annual "Digital Divas" conference on Friday.

EMU Program Manager Bia Hamed says the free one-day event for middle and high school girls aims to help close the gender gap when it comes to careers in science, math, engineering and technology-related fields, often referred to as "STEM."

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9:57 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Too many foster kids eligible for health care rely on "prayer insurance"

Lead in text: 
State of Opportunity's new service, Infowire, looks at why so many young people who've aged out of foster care don't know they're eligible for health care. Foster care advocates are trying to get the word out. Do you know a young person who needs this information? Send them over to State of Opportunity and get them hooked up with the Infowire.
If you aged out of the foster care system you can get free health insurance until age 26.
Politics & Government
9:06 am
Wed April 23, 2014

The week in Michigan politics: Affirmative action and GM

Credit US Supreme Court

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Christina Shockley discuss the U.S. Supreme Court decision on affirmative action, and the latest reactions by GM after the fallout from recalls for ignition switch problems.

Week in Michigan Politics interview for 4/23/14

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Politics & Government
6:33 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Saginaw postpones LGBT discrimination ban

Saginaw city council is delaying a vote on an LGBT discrimination ban.
Credit user Marlith / Flickr

Saginaw is putting off a decision about whether to have a citywide ban on discrimination based 

on sexual orientation or gender identity.  

The Saginaw Council chambers were packed to capacity, according to the Associated Press. 

But the council voted not to make a decision just yet. A few members said they wanted time to talk with the city's business and religious community.

But Councilwoman Annie Boensch says she thinks churches will support it, once they understand they're exempted from the ban.

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Offbeat
5:52 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Humane Society asks Michigan drivers to watch out for turtles

Caution: Turtle Crossing
Credit Humane Society of Huron Valley / Facebook

Why did the turtle cross the road? The answer is that it is just that time of the year again. Michigan's turtles are hitting the roads to go and lay their eggs on the other side.

The Humane Society of Huron Valley is urging drivers to keep on the look out for these little guys making their way across our roads, and to avoid them as safely as possible. If the mood strikes you, get out and nudge them in the direction that they are headed. 

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Transportation
5:11 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Doggy bathroom is the newest, cutest fixture of Metro Airport

Service animal relief area at Detroit Metropolitan Airport
Credit Wayne County Airport Authority

Humans are not the only ones in the airport who need a restroom between flights. That's why Delta Airlines and Detroit Metropolitan Airport today opened the hub's first relief area for service animals.

Nicknamed "Central Bark" by some airport staff,  the area has two grassy sections called "porch potties," with a sprinkler system to wash away waste. It even has a fake fire hydrant.

It means passengers in transit will not have to take their service dogs outside to do their business.

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Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

What can Finnish moths tell us about climate change?

Mark Hunter
Credit webapps.lsa.umich.edu/

Today marks the 44th anniversary of Earth Day. Many consider April 22, 1970 to be the birth of the modern environmental movement.

At that time, Earth Day organizers had an advantage: The environmental problems were highly visible, tangible problems that people came up against in their daily lives, such as toxic effluent from factories spilled into streams and rivers. Kids couldn't swim in lakes and rivers because they were too polluted.  Parks and highways were strewn with trash and air pollution made people sick.

You could draw a direct connection between these problems and the need for environmental action to improve the quality of life for everyone.

Many of today's biggest environmental concerns seem more abstract even though they are perhaps even more threatening than the burning river in Cleveland. Global warming is one example.

That's why a study by our next guest caught our eye. He found that what is happening to moths in Finnish Lapland suggests that we're underestimating the impacts of climate change because much of the harm is hidden from view.

Mark Hunter is a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Michigan, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

U.S. Supreme Court upholds Michigan's affirmative action ban in college admissions

Credit U.S. Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on race- and gender-based affirmative action in college admissions today.

A six-to-two majority on the Court held that Michigan voters were within their rights to amend the state constitution to ban the admission policies.

Rick Pluta is Lansing bureau chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:06 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Will state lawmakers approve the Detroit bankruptcy "grand bargain?"

Credit Peter Martorano / Flickr

It's taken months of bargaining, bickering and posturing, but there have been promising advances in the Detroit bankruptcy journey.

Pieces are starting to fall into place that could complete the so-called "grand bargain" that would protect the DIA collection and soften the blow for Detroit's retirees.

First came word of a tentative deal between the city and its pensioners. A day later, the board that represents police and fire retirees gave a unanimous approval to the deal.

Now it's on to the next hurdle: getting state lawmakers to approve Michigan's share of the grand bargain –$350 million.

Chris Gautz, Capitol Correspondent of Crain's Detroit Business, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:05 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Detroit Big Three ruled the 1964 World's Fair; what's changed in the last 50 years?

Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World's Fair and the Transformation of America.
Credit Twitter

The 1964 World's Fair opened its door to an eager public 50 years ago this day at the Flushing Meadows Corona Park, in New York City.

And it is no exaggeration to say that cars ruled that World's Fair. Detroit's Big Three worked very hard to grab the world's attention.

We talk about what those messages were and how the Detroit Three weren't just selling cars, they were pushing a lifestyle and a political system.

Joseph Tirella, author of Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World's Fair and the Transformation of America, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:05 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Mark Fields to take the place of Alan Mulally as Ford CEO

Alan Mulally
Credit Ford Motor Company

All signs point to a big change at Ford Motor Company.

Although the automaker has not made an official announcement, there is much speculation today that CEO Alan Mulally is reportedly ready to retire before the year is out and COO Mark Fields will ascend to the top spot.

Michigan Radio's auto reporter Tracy Samilton joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
2:59 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Lansing Police Department moving to temporary home

Mayor Virg Bernero announced today the city will spend about a million dollars to renovate and lease part of the Hill Center on the city’s south side.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The bulk of the Lansing Police Department will move into a temporary home this summer.

Mayor Virg Bernero announced today the city will spend about $1 million to renovate and lease part of the Hill Center on the city’s south side.

The city’s current lease at the Motor Wheel complex on the city’s north side expires in August. Lansing has leased that space for more than a decade.

The new lease is only for four years.

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Auto
2:31 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

GM restructuring engineering in response to recall

Credit John F. Martin / Creative Commons

DETROIT – General Motors is adding 35 product safety investigators as part of a larger restructuring in response to a series of safety recalls.

GM says the new investigators will more than double the size of its current team, to 55.

The company is also dividing its global vehicle engineering organization into two sections. A product integrity section will oversee vehicle and engine engineering as well as safety, while a separate department will oversee parts engineering and advanced vehicle development.

GM's product development chief Mark Reuss says the changes were made to ensure that potential problems are spotted and handled more quickly.

The government is investigating why it took GM more than a decade to recall small cars with a defective ignition switch.

The Environment Report
2:16 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Students celebrate Earth Day by planting sequoia clones

Thousands of cuttings from ancient redwoods grow in a mist chamber at Archangel Ancient Tree Archive in Copemish, Michigan.
Sara Hoover Interlochen Public Radio

Listen to today's Environment Report above.

Students in northern Michigan are planting clones of ancient sequoias today.

There's a grove of sequoias along the shores of Lake Michigan on the site of a former Morton Salt factory.

Sequoia trees are not native to Michigan, but this grove has grown in Manistee for more than 65 years when they were brought here from the West Coast. Now, those trees are going to take another trip, or their clones will.

Students who attend Interlochen Arts Academy are planting them on campus along Green Lake. The clones are from Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.

David Milarch is the group's co-founder. He says they’re planting clones of redwoods around the world today.

“Ninety-six percent of all of our redwoods have been cut down, butchered and sold,” Milarch says.

Here's a look at how the group collects genetic material from these old growth trees:

Both the Interlochen Center for the Arts and nearby Interlochen State Park have lost many trees recently due to disease and bug infestation.

Head park ranger Chris Stark has mixed feelings about the planting. He'd prefer to plant native varieties, such as the white pine.

Arts & Culture
1:13 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

The return of Artpod!

Yo Yo Ma is pumped for more Artpod.
Credit Dave Trumpie

It's been a long, stupidly cold and soul-killing winter. 

Few people know that Artpod cannot survive until we've had at least three days above 70 degrees.

So it's only now that Artpod can emerge from hibernation,  much the way men's feet are unfortunately baring themselves to the world in flip flops again.  

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