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A vigil was held Thursday night to mourn the 17 victims in the Parkland school shooting. Fourteen victims were students.
Screengrab - News4Jax / www.news4jax.com

Yes, it is about guns — and our own madness.

Someday, a shooter will walk into a school, probably a suburban school, somewhere in Michigan, and blow teachers and students away, most likely with a weapon no civilian should be allowed to own. When that happens, don’t give me any credit for prophecy.

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An aerial view of Little Caesar's Arena.
Michigan Radio

An African American carpenter says he suffered racial discrimination and harassment on the job during the construction of Detroit’s Little Caesar’s Arena.

Harold Wilson is suing Hardman Construction, the contractor he spent just two days working for in 2015.

Wilson says he had trouble getting hired, despite a need for skilled tradesmen and Detroit resident workers. A city ordinance requires that 51% of all employees working on major development projects in Detroit be city residents.

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette (left) and Special Counsel Todd Flood, along with Genesee County Prosecutor David Leyton and the Flint Water Investigative Team have been investigating the Flint water crisis for most of the year
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

State Attorney General Bill Schuette faced questions this week over whether the state's inquiry into Michigan State University's handling of the Larry Nassar scandal is truly independent. In a newly released letter regarding his appointment of Bill Forsyth to lead the investigation, Schuette says Forsyth will "serve under my direction and at my pleasure."

This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss Schuette's role in the investigation.


Daniel Howes / Detroit News

In the land of Big Three universities and football wins, tiny Marygrove College doesn’t much matter. That’s the Michigan way – a not-so-flattering reflection of its warped values.

That’s a mistake. Marygrove is the creation of Catholic sisters from Monroe still deeply committed to helping Detroit. They opened Marygrove in 1927, establishing what became the state’s only predominantly African-American small liberal arts college. In later years, many of the students were the first in their families to go to college and most of them hailed from Detroit.

The "Sparty" statue on the MSU campus
Betsy Weber / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan State University’s major governing body held its first official public meeting with interim president John Engler today.

The Board and Engler tried to keep the meeting "business as usual," although several members acknowledged calls by students and faculty to step down. 

At the end of the meeting, several students stood up with posters condemning the board and Engler.

Michelle Ress / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

For many companies, their sole goal is to increase profits and improve the bottom line. However, there are a growing number of companies that approach things differently.

Some are focusing on a triple bottom line with an eye towards improving the social and environmental good. The company is not just a moneymaker but also a benefit to the community.

But how do you judge whether the company is actually a benefit to the community, and who judges that?

Mapping Inequality: Redlining in New Deal America / Creative Commons

Fifty years ago, the practice of barring people from buying houses in certain neighborhoods or declining home loans because of race or ethnicity became unlawful.

But a new investigation finds it’s still happening.

Sheila Y / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Tonight, silent French films from the early 20th century will play at the Max M. Fisher Music Center in Detroit as part of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra’s French Festival. But there’s a twist: the films won’t actually be silent. They will be accompanied by the live performance of original scores by the Andrew Alden Ensemble

Mr Niceguy / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

It’s been a busy week in Lansing, between Governor Rick Snyder calling for a variety of policies in the Detroit Free Press, and Democrats and Republicans working together on a controversial tax bill.

Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and former Republican Majority Leader in the Michigan Senate, and Vikki Barnett, former mayor of Farmington Hills and a former Democratic legislator, joined Stateside to discuss the week’s political news.

Courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Today, the long anticipated movie “Black Panther” is being released. It’s a Marvel Comics movie and the central character is black. A recent article in the New York Times Magazine argued this movie is a “defining moment for black America.”

In a sign of the film's anticipated cultural importance, an organization called Hero Nation along with Ypsilanti High School are taking more than 100 students to a private screening of “Black Panther." 

The Michigan Union covered in blooming ivy
Wikimedia Commons

An outside expert will be hired to review the University of Michigan's polices and procedures related to sexual misconduct. U of M President Mark Schlissel announced the review at a meeting of the Board of Regents, and said it was prompted by sexual misconduct incidents across the country, as well as a scandal involving U of M doctor Mark F. Hoeltzel.

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Issues & Ale: Compete, collaborate or stagnate

Feb. 19 - 7:00 PM
The Pretzel Bell, Ann Arbor

Snap Judgment Live

Kalamazoo State Theatre