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A person marking a ballot
Michael Dorausch / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Voters might have the chance to decide a pair of workers’ rights questions next year.

A petition campaign to require businesses to offer employees paid sick and family leave has launched its signature-gathering drive. On the same day, a state elections board approved the form of a campaign to increase the state minimum wage to $12 an hour, which plans to start gathering names next month.

The minimum wage campaign would also require employers pay the $12 an hour even to workers who count tips as part of their earnings.

Money
Andy / Flickr

Republicans in Lansing worked at a breakneck speed Tuesday to pass legislation that would allow politicians in Michigan to solicit campaign contributions on behalf of political action committees.

 

The bills had their first House committee hearing Tuesday morning and were headed to the governor’s desk by the end of the day. They’d passed in the Senate late last week.

 

Car accident
Ted Abbott/Flickr

An unlikely alliance has formed to overhaul Michigan’s auto no-fault system. Speaker of the House Tom Leonard, R-DeWitt, and Detroit’s mayor Mike Duggan met Tuesday. They say the goal is to bring rate relief to all Michigan drivers.

 

Brian Turner / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A federal judge has granted bond to a Detroit-area doctor accused of performing female genital mutilation on young girls.

Doctor Jumana Nagarwala has been behind bars since April, after being arrested for her alleged involvement in the genital cutting procedure performed on two young girls from Minnesota.

groupthing / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

This past Sunday, Detroit Free Press music critic Brian McCollum looked at three white rap artists. They all launched their careers in Southeast Michigan in the 1990s. Since then, they've built national and international fan bases.

They're also on deeply divided sides of the political spectrum. We're talking about Eminem, Kid Rock, and ICP – Insane Clown Posse.

Tracy Samilton

In 2015, the city of Detroit foreclosed on 6,400 owner-occupied homes.

This year, that number was down to 786 -- an 88% reduction.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan says a new law that knocked down the 18% interest rate for back tax payment plans to 6% helped, as did a media blitz by Wayne County Treasurer Eric Sabree and scores of groups and volunteers who got the word out.

"Our neighbors went out and knocked on the doors of homes that were in danger of foreclosure, and person to person said, 'There is help available," said Duggan.

Detroit City Council
Detroit City Council / Facebook

Developers of residential housing who receive public subsidies for their projects in Detroit will have to make 20% of new units affordable, under a proposed ordinance unanimously passed by the Detroit City Council today.

One of the anchors used to hold Line 5 in place under the Straits of Mackinac.
Screen shot of a Ballard Marine inspection video / Enbridge Energy

Monday's meeting of the Michigan Pipeline Safety Advisory Board was filled with worry about the condition of Line 5, the two 64-year-old Enbridge pipelines carrying oil and liquid natural gas under the Straits of Mackinac.

Enbridge recently revealed there are areas of the pipeline where the protective coating has worn off. At first, the company said the areas were "Band-Aid" sized. But then, the story changed.

"Vote here" sign
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s gubernatorial election is still 14 months away, but the field of candidates is growing quickly.

A whopping 20 people have filed with the Secretary of State so far: six Republicans, seven Democrats and seven third-party candidates. And that number is expected to grow before the April 2018 filing deadline.

Davontae Sanford was wrongfully convicted of four murders at age 14. He was released from prison in 2016 spending nearly nine years behind bars.
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

Davontae Sanford is suing the city of Detroit, as well as former Detroit Police Commander James Tolbert and Sgt. Mike Russell, for wrongful imprisonment. 

Sanford spent nearly nine years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. At age 14, he was picked up by Detroit police in 2007 after four people were gunned down in a home in his neighborhood. Police interrogated him off and on for 2 days without a parent or attorneys present.

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