via Walter P. Reuther Library, Wayne State University

Wayne State to honor slain civil rights activist Viola Liuzzo with honorary degree

Wayne State University plans to issue its first-ever posthumous honorary degree to slain Detroit civil rights activist Viola Liuzzo. Liuzzo was murdered by Ku Klux Klan members near Selma, Alabama in 1965. The 39-year-old mother of five was a Wayne State nursing student when she died. “I think that Mrs. Liuzzo could not be a better spokesperson or symbol for Wayne State,” says Kim Trent, who sits on Wayne State’s Board of Governors. “She was a non-traditional student, someone who was really trying to use her life to change America.”
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Sai Pradeep Reddy Kobaku / university of Michigan

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) - It may be the tiniest University of Michigan logo ever made, but it's more than just an effort to show "how small can you go."

Researchers at the Ann Arbor school's College of Engineering have replicated a 3-micron-thick, two-layered block "M" to test a system that they say could be used to deliver drugs at different times and rates or to different parts of the body.

M. Kuhlman

Taking paid time off work to cope with illness is a luxury nearly half of Michigan workers cannot afford, but it's a policy many favor.

A new poll from Denno Research shows that 86 percent of Michigan voters support paid sick time for employees. For 46 percent of the state's private-sector workers, said Dave Woodward with the Economic Justice Alliance of Michigan, time away from work because of illness means no pay.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - Pension cuts are kicking in for roughly 12,000 city of Detroit retirees.

The 4.5 percent reduction is a result of Detroit's bankruptcy. Pension fund spokeswoman Tina Bassett tells the Detroit Free Press that about 1,450 retirees with very low incomes have qualified for financial help from a separate fund. Some people will get as much as $180.

Michigan works to thwart barrage of cyberattacks

Feb 28, 2015
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan is aiming to invest in cyber security and position itself as a national leader in the field as attacks on governments increase.  

The state receives more than 730,000 attempted attacks daily. That number is rising as hackers aim to collect valuable information from Michigan's networks.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Don Schneider loved movies. He really loved movies.

For a half century, he collected movie memorabilia.  Seriously collected.

After Schneider died last Fall at the age of 91, his friends got together to catalogue his collection.    Three months later, they are still at it.

Wikimedia Commons

This week, Jack Lessenberry and Zoe Clark talk about headlines that marked the end of the beginning for some major Michigan issues. Ballot language for the roads funding bill, school money to fill the budget gap, and GOP officials with criminal records are all stories that look like they’re just getting started. 


police officer directing traffic
Flickr user lincolnblues / Flickr

An African-American man is suing the city of Grand Rapids over a police practice his attorney says unfairly targets minorities.

A city attorney wouldn’t comment on the specific case, but says the policy follows the law.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint officials say levels of a potentially harmful chemical in the city's drinking water are now within acceptable limits. 

Flint residents got a shock earlier this year when they learned their tap water had unacceptably high levels of total trihalomethane, a byproduct of chlorine. The city used a large amount to chlorine last summer to treat the city’s water.

user dbking / Flickr

Attorneys for April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse say their challenge before the U.S. Supreme Court to Michigan’s same-sex marriage ban focus on the harmful effects on children.

This is the first round of briefs to be filed since the Supreme Court agreed to hear challenges to same-sex marriage bans in Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee.

Jack Amick / Creative Commons

A handful of former inmates at the Kent County jail are suing the sheriff and food service provider Aramark.

The case stems from a food-borne illness. One afternoon, in April 2012, at least a couple hundred inmates at the Kent County Jail got really sick. The culprit? Bad chicken tacos.

Court documents say they suffered pain, cramps, diarrhea and “long-term adverse health consequences” that’s weren’t detailed.

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