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Stan Grot
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

There’s a new candidate for Michigan secretary of state.

Stan Grot announced he’s running today. He’s a Republican and current Shelby Township clerk. 

“He’s had integrity from the day one that I met him," said Jay Howse of Macomb County. "I’ve always had confidence in his decisions and I know he’ll be right.”            

One role of the Secretary of State is as the top elections officer.

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Detroit is trying to prevent street flooding by regularly cleaning the sewer grates and catch basins on the side of the road.

The city announced the new program Tuesday.

“Lately we’ve been getting less frequent rain but the intensity of the rains has been more severe. So not only is it a nuisance but it also can be hazardous,” Detroit Water and Sewer Department’s chief engineer Palencia Mobley said.

It likely wouldn’t prevent major street flooding like what happened in 2014, but the situation should improve, Mobley said.

Money
Andy / Flickr

Ingham County is continuing to have bookkeeping problems with its treasurer.

Until recently, Treasurer Eric Schertzing had been writing checks the county had no record of. According to county Commissioner Mark Grebner, it wasn’t until a contractor tried to collect money he was owed by the county that questions were raised, and it was discovered a relatively small Community Development Block Grant program was being administered by the treasurer’s office through handwritten checks signed by Schertzing.

A long table surrounded by red chairs in a school classroom.
BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Last year, when Michigan Technical Academy needed money for capital improvements and operations for its elementary and middle school, it turned to private bondholders for a loan.

The contract gave bondholders the right to all but 3% of the district's state school aid money in the event of default. 

So when Central Michigan University revoked the district's charter this spring, CMU got its 3% cut of the July and August school aid payments, and bondholders got the rest.

That left nothing for teachers. 

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What’s lighting up stages in Michigan this month?

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside today to give his take on productions from professional theater companies around the state.

Courtesy of Mark Mathe

It’s an ancient way of life under 21st century economic pressures.

According to the state’s numbers, the food and agriculture industry pumps $101 billion into Michigan’s economy each year. It employs some 923,000 people. That’s nearly a quarter of Michigan’s workforce.

So, what does the next generation of farmers think about the future of agriculture in our state?

Da Capo Press, 2017

He was a welcome presence on ESPN and ABC for decades. During his 30 years at ESPN, John Saunders lived every sports fan’s dream job.

But even as this one-time Western Michigan University hockey player rose to become one of the country’s most popular sportscasters, he secretly battled depression – and endured personal traumas that are hard to believe.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

An auto parts maker will soon be setting up shop on the site of a former iconic auto assembly plant in Michigan.

Buick City in Flint closed nearly 20 years ago.  Since then, the land has sat largely vacant.

But the Michigan Strategic Fund this week approved more than $4 million to assist Lear Corporation, which plans to build a nearly $30 million auto seat assembly plant on the old Buick City site.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Next year, professional golf will return to the Flint area.

The Buick Open was a popular stop on the PGA tour for decades.

Tiger Woods won the final Buick Open in Flint in 2009. A lot’s happened to Flint and Tiger Woods in the decade since. At least professional golf is successfully making a comeback in Genesee County.   

A cyanobacteria; bloom on Lake Erie in 2013.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

There’s a green bloom of cyanobacteria on Lake Erie again. People who run water utilities and scientists are watching the bloom because the cyanobacteria can produce toxins called microcystins that are dangerous for people and pets. It's what made Toledo’s drinking water unsafe to drink in 2014.

Chris Winslow directs Ohio Sea Grant and Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory. He says the bloom’s covering about 10% of the western basin.

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