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AN ENBRIDGE INSPECTION VIDEO SHARED WITH THE STATE OF MICHIGAN

Bill could shut down Mackinac Straits oil pipeline

An oil pipeline running beneath the Straits of Mackinac could be shut down under a bill in the legislature. The company that operates the pipeline insists it’s safe. Nevertheless, State Senator Rick Jones wants a third party analysis of Line 5.

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United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement

A father who went to court hoping to gain custody of his children Wednesday found himself getting arrested by immigration agents instead.

Most of us don't think about how much electricity costs at different times of the day. But the state's two largest utilities are planning to change that.

When it's really, really hot and humid out, what do lots of people do when they get home? They turn on, or turn up, the air conditioning.

There are big spikes in electricity demand on the hottest summer days, between 2:00 in the afternoon to 7:00 in the evening.

BES Photos / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

What’s up is down and what’s down is up when it comes to ranking schools in Michigan.

Dozens of schools found they dropped 50 points in the state rankings while others soared from near the bottom to near top of the list.

Erin Einhorn, a reporter with Chalkbeat, joined Stateside to try to make sense of this rollercoaster ride for Michigan's school rankings. 

a courtroom
Bill Ledbetter / flickr

Here’s the big question: Did a judge just block 80-plus women and girls from talking about their sexual assault allegations against former Olympic gymnastics and MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar?

Or does today’s order to “limit public disclosure” just mean that attorneys with civil suits against Nassar can’t call him a pedophile on Facebook?

Depends who you ask. And even some of the lawyers mentioned in this brief say they don’t totally understand how to interpret the order.

Nassar’s defense: We can’t get a fair trial without judge’s help

crowd at protest
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

A man from southwest Detroit has two weeks before he is deported back to Mexico after living in the city for almost 20 years. 

Mario Hernandez came to the U.S. as an adult without a visa in 1998. He has no criminal record, and his friends and supporters say he has made a positive impact in the community.

But it's unlikely Hernandez will be able to stay in the U.S. after his stay of removal request was denied by the U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals.

cash
Public Domain

Another tax incentive for Michigan businesses passed the state Senate Wednesday and is on its way to the House.

Tax cuts, be they for businesses or individuals, have been a hot topic in Lansing all session. The latest would let big businesses keep a portion of their employees’ income tax. So, some of the tax you would normally pay to the government would instead go to your employer.

Sen. Jim Stamas, R-Midland, is a bill sponsor. He says this would make Michigan more competitive with other states.

Ingham County

Michigan cities and towns are hurting for cash. Many have had to cut services like street and sidewalk repair. Some have had to reduce the size of their police and fire departments. 

The usual suspects of municipal finance woes—weak property tax revenues and rising employee retirement costs—share much of the blame.

But today there is another culprit: the state of Michigan itself.

row of buses
dhendrix73 / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Under Michigan law, public schools aren't allowed to start classes before Labor Day.

A bill recently approved by the state Senate Education Committee would change that.

Under the new legislation, districts would be allowed to start school in August. But the bill would also require that those schools have three-day weeks until after Labor Day.

Catherine Techtmann, University of Wisconsin-Extension

The changing climate the Earth is experiencing is changing the forests in Michigan. Warmer and shorter winters affect trees, pests and the diseases that damage trees.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Now that a judge has approved a legal settlement to replace lead pipes in Flint, the city is acting quickly to get the process moving.

Tuesday, U.S. District Judge David Lawson signed off on the deal under which the state of Michigan will set aside $97 million to pay for replacing 18,000 lead and galvanized service lines during the next three years. 

Last year, Flint removed nearly 800 lead and galvanized steel service lines. This year, the plan is to replace 6,000.         

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver says city residents are ready.

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