Robbie Wroblewski / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The debate over county animal shelters using gas chambers to euthanize sick or unwanted animals is heating up in southwest Michigan.

In the beginning of 2015, only 4 of Michigan’s 83 counties still used the “inhalation method,” or “gas chamber” to kill unwanted animals at county animal control facilities.

Cass County, southwest of Kalamazoo, still uses a chamber. Branch County, south of Battle Creek, probably still would too, but its animal shelter burned down earlier this year.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

  

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War. But the end of slavery in the United States wasn’t official until the 13th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in December of 1865. The end of slavery also meant the end of the Underground Railroad. Detroit was one of the last stops before freedom for thousands of former slaves. 

AeroVelo

A Canadian group hoping to break the human-powered land speed record is testing its speed-bike on a General Motors test track on Monday.

The current record is 83.1 miles per hour. 

AeroVelo thinks its new recumbent speed bike can go about 87. 

Mandy / MorgueFile

The National Weather Service has issued a beach hazards statement through 8 p.m. Monday for the Lake Michigan shoreline in Michigan.

High waves and strong currents, including rip currents, are creating dangerous swimming conditions.

Beaches with particularly dangerous conditions today include:

  • South Beach in South Haven
  • Grand Haven State Park
  • Pere Marquette Park in Muskegon

We read your emails, and we're proving it today by talking about pinkies, other fingers, and humerus bones.

One of you asked about the pinky finger.

University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan discovered the pinky finger comes from the adjective “pinky,” which meant small.

“It at first referred to eyes,” Curzan explains. “So people with pinky eyes … like little squinty eyes.”  

But eventually its meaning moved from our eyes to our little fingers and made its way to the United States at the end of the 19th century.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse were married in Southfield, Michigan on Saturday, by the same Detroit judge who struck down Michigan's ban on same-sex marriage.

The lawsuit was consolidated with cases from other states, and went before the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry.

DeBoer and Rowse waited to marry until it was legal in their home state. 

The ceremony was by turns awkward, hilarious, and deeply touching. 

(courtesy of HIVandHepatitis.com)

Doctors have been grossly underestimating liver damage in patients with hepatitis C, according to a new study in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

The study, which involved 9,783 patients, showed that 2,788, or 29 percent, had signs of cirrhosis, but only 1,727 had the condition properly documented in their medical records. 

Kate Wells

A woman in a minivan is not at all happy with Bethany Campbell’s massive poster, which shows the bloody detached head of a fetus and reads “Choice is Abortion.”

“Little kids do not need to see that picture,” the minivan lady shouts over traffic noise at a busy intersection in Ann Arbor.

“Yes, they do,” says Campbell, a blonde 25-year-old from Saline who says she’s worked as a nurse, and that while she’s been “pro-life my entire life,” this is her first time actually coming out to a protest against abortion.

All photos by Marvin Shaouni

Andrew Niemcyzk worked for years as a coal miner in his native Poland, during which time he would examine the mine's earthen walls and think about the way water was moving from the surface deep into the ground. He didn’t know it then, but that curiosity would lead to the establishment of Parjana, a Detroit company that is poised to change the way the whole world manages water.

Parjana's true origins, however, are in a wet Hamtramck basement.

Tamar Charney

I muttered "sorry" as I handed over my credit card to buy an 80-cent locally grown peach from the cute little farm market near the office.

“It’s 2015, nobody carries cash” was the hippie hipster cashier's response. It's true I almost never carry cash, but still from time to time I’m embarrassed to use a credit card knowing that the card fees relative to my purchase make no sense for the store. But I hate dealing with cash.

Except that’s not quite true. I’m actually conflicted about cash.

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