Auto
3:08 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

GM says it has replaced 491,000 ignition switches

Credit NHTSA

DETROIT - General Motors says it has replaced faulty ignition switches on just under 20 percent of 2.6 million small cars that are being recalled.

The company has repaired just over 491,000 cars that are covered by the recall announced in February.

Switch maker Delphi Automotive says it has produced over 1 million parts and expects to have made 2 million by the end of August. GM says it expects all parts to be made by late October.

Delphi CEO Rodney O'Neal tells lawmakers his company has added three lines to speed up production.

Some car owners have complained it's taking too long for GM to finish repairs.

The switches can slip into the accessory position and unexpectedly shut off engines. That has caused crashes that killed at least 13 people.

Environment & Science
2:58 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Public hearings on proposed "fracking" rules wraps up, ballot campaign could follow

Member of the public with a “No Fracking” sticker on her clothes as she testifies before a panel of environmental regulators.
Credit Rick Pluta

State environmental regulators will put the finishing touches on new rules regarding “fracking” now that public hearings have wrapped up. They expect to have the new rules adopted by the end of the year, but the state’s rules may not be the final word on the controversial drilling process

“Fracking” is a drilling method that pushes water and chemicals into wells to force out oil and gas deposits.

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Politics & Government
1:22 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Detroit clerk, Michigan Democrats debut online absentee ballot application

Detroit voters will now be able to access, sign and submit absentee ballot applications on their smartphones.

Detroit city clerk Janice Winfrey and Michigan Democratic Party Chair Lon Johnson announced the new initiative Wednesday.

Winfrey said it’s simply a matter of meeting voters where they tend to be these days—online.

“So why not? Why not be able to use their smartphone to request an absentee ballot?” Winfrey asked.

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Stateside
1:07 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Detroit's bankruptcy, one year later

Credit JSFauxtaugraphy/Flickr

Tomorrow afternoon at 4:06 is the one-year anniversary of the largest municipal bankruptcy in American history.

Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes has been talking with top business leaders in Detroit for a "temperature check" on how this first year has gone.

He said that the kind of leadership and coalescence that happened in the past year was something he’s never seen before in this community.

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The Environment Report
11:38 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Climate change fueling increase in pollen, allergies

http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/images/indicator_downloads/ragweed-download1-2014.png

Today's Environment Report examines the link between allergies and climate change

If even hearing the word “ragweed” makes your eyes water, you might be one of the nearly 45 million Americans with seasonal allergies. Researchers say climate change is fueling the rise in allergies and asthma.

Jenny Fischer has been taking over-the-counter medication for allergies for a long time. Without it, she suffers cold-like symptoms: a runny nose, sneezing and congestion. An allergy pill usually made it better. But a couple of years ago, things started to get worse.

“I’d be out at 5:30 in the morning walking my dog, and it would just be huffing and puffing. And, you know, I couldn’t catch my breath. It's scary," she said.

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Opinion
11:01 am
Thu July 17, 2014

Michigan Republican Party's tactics remind me of Watergate, because both were unnecessary

Back in the 1960s, there was a hilarious TV sitcom called Get Smart, which portrayed the adventures of the world’s most inept spy.

Maxwell Smart was a bumbler who talked into his not-so-secret shoe telephone, carried around a device called the cone of silence, and never really had a clue as to what was going on.

Well, the Cold War is long over, but if he were around today, Smart would clearly have a future in politics.

This week, we learned that the Snyder re-election campaign has evidently revived some version of the classic department of dirty tricks, tactics made most famous by another Richard, the late President Nixon.

The Michigan Republican Party now admits it sent two staffers into a Mark Schauer fundraising event wearing high-tech hidden camera glasses.

Democrats later got possession of the disc, apparently because the Republicans clumsily lost it. My understanding is that it shows the two paid staffers chowing down on appetizers and worrying that the people at the event were on to them. They apparently made small talk with Lisa Brown, the Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor, but not Schauer.

You might think Republicans would now be embarrassed.

But you’d be wrong.

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Politics & Government
11:20 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

DIA secures $26.8 million in corporate pledges, reaches 80% of "grand bargain" goal

Credit Detroit Institute of Arts

The Detroit Institute of Arts is closer to fully funding its portion of the “grand bargain.”

The museum announced $26.8 million in additional corporate pledges today on Wednesday.

8 companies announced contributions. The Penske Corporation led the way with a $10 million donation, while both Quicken Loans/Rock Enterprises and DTE Energy chipped in $5 million.

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Stateside
5:36 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

New plans for Tiger Stadium site are underway

Tiger Stadium at Michigan and Trumbell
Credit Wikimedia Commons

It's been 15 years since the Detroit Tigers played their final game at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull.

The old Tiger Stadium was torn down in 2009. Since then, no one's been able to agree on what to do with the 10-acre site until now.

The field will remain for youth sports, including high school and college baseball.  Along Cochrane Avenue, a new headquarters will be built for the Detroit Police Athletic League, who will maintain the playing field. The headquarters would extend from the street to roughly the old third base line and could cost almost $10 million.

Detroit Free Press business writer John Gallagher said this plan represents a merger of two conflicting visions – preserving the field for baseball - and developing it for new businesses and jobs.

“I think everybody gets a little something out of this,” Gallagher said.

*Listen to full interview above. 

Stateside
5:33 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Mitch Albom's "Ernie" is running for the fourth summer in Detroit

Peter Carey (left) as 'Ernie' and T.J. Corbett (right) as 'the Boy'
Credit David Lou Reed

Mitch Albom’s play “Ernie” is now running its fourth summer at the City Theatre in Detroit.

Peter Carey was the understudy for Will Young for two years and took the stage in 2011 as Ernie Harwell, the Detroit Tigers sportscaster.

This is Carey’s first time performing as Ernie in the play.

The only other person on stage with him is T.J. Corbett, playing a young fan. Both actors joined Stateside today to talk about their experience telling the story of Ernie’s final bow at Comerica Park in 2009.

“It means a lot to a lot of people,” Corbett said. “They just keep coming back, sometimes more than once in a season.”

“They love the feeling, the energy that Ernie is and was,” Carey said.

Carey worked with Ernie in TV, radio, and film, including a Disney movie called “Tiger Town.”

They did commercials and live events together and hosted the Grosse Pointe Action Auction. A few months before Ernie passed, they hosted a live radio show in Ann Arbor at Zingerman’s Roadhouse.

“When you were with Ernie, you were his best friend. You were the most important person in that room because he made you feel that way, and you got his full attention,” Carey said.

Ernie Harwell died at the age of 92 in the spring of 2010 from cancer. He broadcasted for the Tigers for 42 years.

T.J. Corbett sets up the frame of the play.

“He’s about to leave when seemingly out of nowhere this kid dressed in 1930s clothing shows up and says, I want to hear your broadcast,’” Corbett said. “And Ernie says ‘I don’t broadcast games anymore,’ so the kid says, ‘well I want to hear the broadcast of your life.’ So Ernie tells the kid the nine innings of his life.”

Mitch Albom's "Ernie" runs now through August 17 at the City Theatre inside the Hockeytown Cafe in Detroit. You can get ticket information through OlympiaEntertainment.com or Ticketmaster.

To learn more about the cast and crew click here.

*Listen to full interview above. 

-Bre'Anna Tinsley, Michigan Radio Newsroom

Stateside
5:31 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Dearborn man arrested for killing two Irish soldiers in Lebanon 34 years ago

Credit Wikipedia

A 71 year-old ice cream man was arrested Tuesday at his Dearborn home on an immigration violation.

Mahmoud Bazzi is accused of the torture killings of two Irish soldiers in 1980. The soldiers were part of the UN peacekeeping mission in southern Lebanon. A third Irish soldier was shot but survived.

Bazzi moved to the United States shortly after the killings and settled in Dearborn.

Jim Schaefer has been covering this story for the Detroit Free Press. He said Bazzi entered the United States about 21 years ago on someone else’s passport. The government intends to deport Bazzi on this violation. Bazzi attempted to apply for citizenship last year.

Schaffer joined Stateside to recount the events in Lebanon that day.

*Listen to the full story above. 

Newsmaker Interview
5:29 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Central American children destined for Michigan?

Derrick McCree, Senior Vice President of Residential Services at Wolverine Human Services

There has been a recent influx of undocumented children who are crossing the Mexican border into the U.S. Many of these children hail from Central American nations where violence is prevalent. Recent news that some of these children could be housed here at a facility in Vassar, Michigan while awaiting immigration hearings has received mixed reactions.

Wolverine Human Services is an organization that owns and operates a facility in Vassar and might house some of the Central American children. Jennifer White, host of All Things Considered, is joined by Derrick McCree, senior VP of Wolverine Human Services.

McCree says as it stands right now, the contract is still under consideration by the Office of Refugee Settlement. The contracting company, Heartland Alliance of Chicago, Illinois, has been providing services for children in similar circumstances for the past 19 years. Due to the humanitarian crisis at the national level, Heartland Alliance reached out to other providers, particularly in Michigan, to inquire about providing assistance.

The services provided are essential, basic shelter services, medical care, education in the format of ESL, recreational activities, and trauma counseling. Heartland Alliance would cover the reunification fees to help seek relatives or family members within the U.S. where the child could stay while the court proceedings play out. If no family member or relative is located, the option of a foster family exists.

According to McCree, funding for the program comes from the federal government. And while there has been vocal opposition to the idea of housing children in Vassar, McCree says the Vassar community has been largely supportive, and he's heard from people who are interested in helping the Central American children. McCree says the children making their way to the southern U.S. border are escaping what are often very dangerous situaations, and they are in need of help.

Omar Saadeh - Michigan Radio Newsroom 

Stateside
5:27 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

GVSU tries to bring new technologies into the classroom

Technology showcase at Grand Valley State University
Credit gvsu.edu/techshowcase / gvsu.edu/techshowcase

How can cutting-edge new technologies be used in the classroom?

Sure, devices like Google Glass or a 3-D printer are cool.

But how can they be used to teach and to learn?

Eric Kunnen is the emerging technologies coordinator at Grand Valley State University.

"Trying to find that sweet spot there between teaching learning and technology is where we are focused and having access to the technology is one piece," Kunnen said.

Kunnen said that Google Glass could be useful in the classroom by providing hands free operations.

“Think in terms of a visual demonstration maybe in a science classroom, where you need both hands as the instructor,” Kunnen said. “Also the ability in wearing the glasses and having information on top of what you are seeing has a lot of potential as well.”

But where is the boundary in using technology for a good purpose, versus using it because it’s cool?

Kunnen said when figuring out when to use the technology, they start with trying to solve an instructional problem.

“How do we address a difficult concept that is very challenging to explain perhaps, or very difficult to visualize, and how do we apply technology to that as a solution?” Kunnen said.

An example he gave was difficulty in visualizing 3D protein molecules, but a 3D projection image could help solve that problem.

New technology are on display in Grand Valley’s Technology showcase, located in the Mary Idema Pew Library on campus.

“The concept really is to interact, learn, discover, and share how technology can transform teaching and learning at the university,’ Kunnen said.

*Listen to full interview above. 

Law
5:20 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Future of medical marijuana bills uncertain after clearing state Senate panel

Credit user elioja / Flickr

Two bills that would ease restrictions on medical marijuana in Michigan are one step closer to becoming law. A state Senate panel approved the legislation Wednesday.

But it is not clear what will happen to the bills now that they are going to the full Senate.

House Bill 4271 would let communities decide to allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries. House Bill 5104 would allow patients to use edible and other non-smokable forms of cannabis.

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Politics & Government
4:01 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Michigan's campaign for governor gets weird as Republicans deploy spyglasses

From the video put together by Mark Schauer's campaign. The alleged "spy cam" on a Republican staffer.
Credit Mark Schauer / YouTube

I guess we should expect it in our politics these days.

Recording technology is getting smaller and some recordings have been seen as game changers.

When David Corn of Mother Jones released Mitt Romney's "47% video," the predictions came in:

"You can mark my prediction now: A secret recording from a closed-door Mitt Romney fundraiser, released today by David Corn at Mother Jones, has killed Mitt Romney's campaign for president."

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Politics & Government
3:02 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Candidates using deep pockets to bankroll Congressional campaigns

4th Congressional District candidate Paul Mitchell has spent nearly $2 million of his own campaign. Mitchell’s campaign has actually spent more money than his two GOP rivals to replace outgoing Congressman Dave Camp have raised.
Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

New data show Michigan congressional candidates are digging deep into their own pockets to pay for their campaigns.

A trio of businessmen running for Republican congressional nominations have dug the deepest, according to filings with the Federal Election Commission this week.

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Auto safety
2:36 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Teens should not be driving old, small cars, says safety group

IIHS says parents should "buy as much safety as you can afford" when shopping for a used car for a teen driver.
Credit IIHS / Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

A new analysis by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety finds that a disproportionate number of teenagers who died in car accidents were driving older, smaller cars.

Small, older model cars tend to be lightweight and lack electronic stability control and side air bags. 

Yet these are the cars parents typically buy for their teens, who are the least experienced drivers on the road. 

Russ Rader of IIHS says cost shouldn't be the only factor when choosing a car for a young driver.

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Stateside
12:43 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Berrien County's program is reducing juvenile recidivism

Credit Wikimedia Commons

In a story we aired yesterday on European prisons, we learned the apparent key to reducing recidivism. In Europe, keeping family ties intact is priceless.

There’s a juvenile justice plan in Berrien County that’s been applying these principles since 2001, strengthening family ties, and keeping young offenders out of jail when possible.

And their approach is paying off.

Elvin Gonzalez is the family Division Administrator for the Berrien County Trial Court.

He said that when looking at the youth who come into to court to look at their family system.

“Many of the factors that contributed to them being logged with delinquency came from two primary domains, their family domain and their school domain,” Gonzalez said.

Gonzalez said that it was important to address both of those domains and provide interventions that target those areas, strengthen the families’ ability to supervise, effectively monitor and discipline, and support their children.

“Our belief is, is that kids live in an ecology. That ecology is their family system, their neighborhood, their community, their school and we needed to impact those areas to help youth be successful in our communities," Gonzalez said.

Gonzalez added that while they are trying to fix the source of the youth’s actions, accountability for those actions are not forgotten.

The county has seen a lot of success with their programs. In 2001, more than 125 youths were in out-of-home residential placements throughout Michigan. Today, that number has dropped to about 40 youths.

Recidivism has dropped from more than 58% in 1998 to 17.5% in 2012. 

“It’s important that we help kids learn various skills, be more effective in managing conflict, make better decisions – but ultimately, at the end of the day, we need to move the needle on recidivism,” Gonzalez said.

*Listen to full interview above.

11:58 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Teaching students how to switch between Black English and Standard English can help them get ahead

Lead in text: 
Instead of using "right" and "wrong" to describe Standard American English versus African-American English, Craig’s model uses "formal" and "informal" designations, so there’s no judgment attached to either language.
Last week we did a story about whether people judge others based on how they speak. (Spoiler alert: Yep, they do.)
Opinion
10:51 am
Wed July 16, 2014

Some think their immigrant ancestors were the last that should be allowed in the U.S.

I’ve always had a warm place in my heart for the sugar beet country of Michigan’s Thumb.

Years ago, I used to take graduate journalism students to Caro for a day where they would put out a special edition of the Tuscola County Advertiser.

The folks there were open, friendly, warm-hearted, and hard-working, but I have to say I’m ashamed of some of them today.

They are disgracing our state and reminding us of some of the ugliest chapters in American history.

Here’s why: Thousands of children and teenagers have been turning up at the United States’ southern border over the last few months. We are, if you’ve forgotten, a nation founded by refugees and which, to this very day, has remained open to those seeking political asylum.

That’s the beautiful part of our legacy.

The ugly part is that far too many of us think our ancestors were the last immigrants who should have been allowed in. That’s been reflected throughout our history in signs that said “No Irish need apply,” communities that refused to allow Jews, and the entire history of black America.

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Arts & Culture
10:40 am
Wed July 16, 2014

A delicate piece of art history in Jackson, Michigan is geting a little help

Glass mural with moving lights from the foyer of the old Consumers Energy building in Jackson, Michigan, shortly before the building was demolished
Credit Chrystal Weesner / Pinterest

A piece of Jackson’s art history, which narrowly avoided the wrecking ball, may soon have new life.

The 28' x 9' glass mural depicting the history of electric power hung in Consumers Energy’s old Jackson headquarters for more than four decades.   

Preservationists were able to save it from the wrecking ball that brought the building down last year. The mural was disassembled and has been in storage ever since.

The plan now is to reconstruct the glass mural, replace its internal lighting system, and build a new outdoor display to house the mural.

The mural would be placed on the grounds of a new city park being built on the site of the old Consumers Energy headquarters.

“We hope to be able to have the new mural in place by….this time next year,” says Grant Bauman, whose part of the team working on the project.

He says the glass mural will add to the mix of public art in downtown Jackson.

This month, the project received a $50,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Organizers still need to raise about $200,000 for the glass mural project.

A Consumers Energy spokesman says the company has contributed to the preservation of the mural in the past, but has not committed to donating to the current project.

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