Anne Curzan http://michiganradio.org en Different from, or different than? http://michiganradio.org/post/different-or-different <p></p><p>For some folks, it makes a big difference whether you say X is different <em>from </em>Y or X is different <em>than </em>Y.</p><p>This week on <em>That's What They Say</em>, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan look at the confusion surrounding the use of "different from" and "different than."</p><p>According to Curzan, both forms are correct and it's just a matter of preference.</p><p>"Some people think it should be 'different from' because it is a question of exclusion, it's not a question of degree, so if things are different, you're excluding everything else," says Curzan. "Speakers have been using 'different from' and 'different than' since the 17th century. And in British English, speakers have also used 'different to', so we've got 3 different propositions happening there."</p><p>Curzan explains that with a noun, many speakers opt to use either one. For example, one might say a psychologist's view will be 'different than' an economist or a psychologist's view will be 'different from' an economist. In these cases the use of either form is correct.</p><p>What about the next phrase? Which one is right? 'Someone went missing' or 'someone is missing.'"&nbsp;Curzan says it's another case of British English entering into American English.</p><p>Which form do you prefer to use? Different from or different than? Let us know by leaving a comment below!</p><p><em>Omar Saadeh -&nbsp;Michigan Radio Newsroom</em></p><p> Sun, 20 Jul 2014 12:55:00 +0000 Rina Miller & Anne Curzan 18431 at http://michiganradio.org Different from, or different than? Uncles have avuncular, what do aunts have? http://michiganradio.org/post/uncles-have-avuncular-what-do-aunts-have <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Uncles have their own adjective in avuncular, but aunts don’t have any such adjective.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">On this week's edition of <em>That's What They Say</em>, host </span>Rina<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne </span>Curzan<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> explore adjectives related to family members. &nbsp;</span></p><p><em style="line-height: 1.5;">“Paternal</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> related to fathers, </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">maternal</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> for mothers, </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">fraternal</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> for brothers, </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">sororal</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">, which is not a really common adjective but it’s available in the language related to sisters. You get </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">filial</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> related to sons and daughters, and then </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">parental</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> for parents,” says Curzan. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p><p>She also points out that these adjective that come from Latin often feel more formal than their Germanic synonyms.</p><p>“What we are seeing here is a wider pattern in the English language where we have these synonyms where one is borrowed like <em>paternal</em> or <em>maternal</em> and one of them is a native English word. It’s a Germanic word that’s been in English since English has been around. And often the native English word will feel warmer to us. It will feel closer to us and the borrowed one will feel a little bit more formal.”</p><p><em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Listen to the segment above.</span></em></p><p> Sun, 13 Jul 2014 14:08:16 +0000 Rina Miller & Anne Curzan 18346 at http://michiganradio.org Uncles have avuncular, what do aunts have? Various pronunciations of common words http://michiganradio.org/post/various-pronunciations-common-words <p>You say potato and I say ... well, that depends.</p><p>On this week's edition of That's What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan investigate the &nbsp;various pronunciation of commonly used words.</p> Sun, 06 Jul 2014 12:05:00 +0000 Rina Miller & Anne Curzan 18244 at http://michiganradio.org Various pronunciations of common words The difference between 'one-off' and 'one of a kind' http://michiganradio.org/post/difference-between-one-and-one-kind <p>The expression 'one off' is not a one of a kind expression.</p><p>This week on <em>That's What They Say</em>, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan inquire about the concept of 'one off' and its origins.</p><p>According to Curzan, 'one off' first shows up in 1934, and it means 'made or done as only one of its kind', and it's not repeated - it's a one-off product, a one-off event. Its origins are British, but has been in use in American English since the 1980s.</p> Sun, 29 Jun 2014 12:05:00 +0000 Anne Curzan & Rina Miller 18064 at http://michiganradio.org The difference between 'one-off' and 'one of a kind' Commonly used baseball expressions in everyday talk http://michiganradio.org/post/commonly-used-baseball-expressions-everyday-talk <p>Play ball!</p><p>Even when we are not talking about baseball, we are often using the language of baseball.</p><p>On this week's edition of <em>That's What They Say</em>, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan&nbsp;explore baseball terminology and the expressions that are commonly used, even though the reference may have nothing to do with baseball.</p> Sun, 22 Jun 2014 12:05:00 +0000 Anne Curzan & Rina Miller 18063 at http://michiganradio.org Commonly used baseball expressions in everyday talk Salutations and closings in the digital age http://michiganradio.org/post/salutations-and-closings-digital-age <p></p><p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Greetings!</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">In emails and letters, we address a lot of people who are not dear to us as<br />"dear."</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">On this weekend’s edition of </span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">That’s What They Say</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">, host </span>Rina<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Miller talks with University of Michigan English Professor Anne </span>Curzan<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> about greetings and closings used in the age of the email.</span></p> Mon, 16 Jun 2014 13:14:11 +0000 Rina Miller & Anne Curzan 17802 at http://michiganradio.org Salutations and closings in the digital age A guide to expressions of caution and disapproval http://michiganradio.org/post/guide-expressions-caution-and-disapproval <p></p><p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Heads Up!</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Sometimes we’re warned to watch our head, but when you think about it, that&nbsp;doesn't&nbsp;seem physically possible.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">How can you watch your head?</span></p> Sun, 08 Jun 2014 12:05:00 +0000 Rina Miller & Anne Curzan 17782 at http://michiganradio.org A guide to expressions of caution and disapproval Fashionable words falling out of style http://michiganradio.org/post/fashionable-words-falling-out-style <p></p><p></p><p>Fuddy<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> </span>duddy<span style="line-height: 1.5;">!</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">If you use the word </span>‘fuddy<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> </span>duddy’<span style="line-height: 1.5;">, young people might just think you are one.</span></p> Sun, 01 Jun 2014 12:05:00 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom, Anne Curzan & Rina Miller 17680 at http://michiganradio.org Fashionable words falling out of style The apostrophe: its rules and why it’s confusing http://michiganradio.org/post/apostrophe-its-rules-and-why-it-s-confusing <p></p><p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Many writers get tripped up about when the word “its” has an apostrophe and when it does not.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">On this week’s edition of&nbsp;</span><em style="line-height: 1.5;">That’s What They Say</em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">, host </span>Rina<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne </span>Curzan<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> discuss the oftentimes confusing placement of the apostrophe.</span></p> Sun, 18 May 2014 12:05:00 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom, Anne Curzan & Rina Miller 17561 at http://michiganradio.org The apostrophe: its rules and why it’s confusing