what's working http://michiganradio.org en Home Share program brings different generations under one roof http://michiganradio.org/post/home-share-program-brings-different-generations-under-one-roof <p>The Ann Arbor Home Share program at the University of Michigan connects homeowners over the age of 55 with younger people looking for a place to live.&nbsp;</p><p>The program allows senior homeowners to manage household chores and offset costs--but it also offers companionship.&nbsp;</p><p>Every arrangement is unique.</p><p>In some cases, younger roommates take on housework or run errands in exchange for lower rent.&nbsp;</p><p>Michigan Radio&#39;s Christina Shockley spoke with Carol Tice and Kristina Gifford, who participate in the Home Share program. Tice, 80, rents out part of her home to Gifford, 24. Tice&nbsp;has been a participant for over 7 years.</p><p> Mon, 19 Dec 2011 11:00:09 +0000 Christina Shockley 5458 at http://michiganradio.org Home Share program brings different generations under one roof Help for four-legged family members http://michiganradio.org/post/help-four-legged-family-members-0 <p><a href="http://www.cascadeshumanesociety.org/programs/index.html">Cascades&nbsp;Humane Society</a> in Jackson, Mich. offers pet food and supplies to families who are having financial difficulties. The pet food pantry helps families keep their pets and reduces the number of animals in need of new homes.</p><p>As part of our What&rsquo;s Working series, Michigan Radio&rsquo;s Christina Shockley speaks with Debra Carmody, executive director of Cascades Humane Society, about the pet food pantry program.&nbsp;</p><p><a href="http://www.americanpetproducts.org/press_industrytrends.asp">Sixty-two percent of US households</a>&nbsp;have at least one pet. Yearly pet care costs <a href="http://www.aspca.org/adoption/pet-care-costs.aspx">can range from $500 to $800</a>&mdash;an expense that might be out of reach for families that are forced to downsize. &ldquo;When you see people coming to our agency and they have to relinquish their pets, it&rsquo;s heartbreaking,&rdquo; Carmody says.&nbsp;</p><p> Mon, 12 Dec 2011 11:00:33 +0000 Christina Shockley 5343 at http://michiganradio.org Help for four-legged family members Michigan's State Park System http://michiganradio.org/post/michigans-state-park-system <p>The Michigan State Park System won the gold medal award this year for the top state park system in the nation. People use the parks for swimming and boating during the summer, and hunting and downhill skiing during the winter, among a host of other activities.&nbsp; We wanted to find out more about how the parks system affects our lives.&nbsp; So, as part of our series, &quot;What&#39;s Working,&quot; we called Ron Olson, the Chief of Parks and Recreation.</p> Mon, 28 Nov 2011 14:59:52 +0000 Christina Shockley & What's Working 5149 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan's State Park System Volunteers paint Ann Arbor schools http://michiganradio.org/post/volunteers-paint-ann-arbor-schools <p>Gene Firn is the founder of Paint for Kids, an Ann Arbor-based organization that mobilizes parents and community volunteers to paint schools.</p><p>Firn, who teaches a DIY painting class, was looking for practice walls for his students when he learned that the Ann Arbor school system doesn&#39;t have a painting department. He&nbsp;thought he could help, so he submitted a proposal.</p><p>The concept is simple: an experienced painter supervises parent volunteers as they transform hallways and classrooms over holiday weekends.</p><p>Michigan Radio&#39;s Christina Shockley spoke with Firn, who said that Paint for Kids fulfills the needs of local schools, but also attempts to create a culture of volunteering.</p><p> Mon, 21 Nov 2011 05:06:35 +0000 Christina Shockley & What's Working 5077 at http://michiganradio.org Volunteers paint Ann Arbor schools Helping fellow veterans http://michiganradio.org/post/helping-fellow-veterans <p>Many service members face hardships when they return from active duty.&nbsp; A program at the University of Michigan puts new vets in touch with other veterans to help guide them through the process of returning to everyday life back at home. Brandon Brogan is the program manager of the Buddy-to-Buddy Volunteer Veteran program. As part of our What&#39;s Working series, Michigan Radio&#39;s Christina Shockley spoke with Brogan. Tue, 15 Nov 2011 11:23:40 +0000 Christina Shockley & What's Working 4989 at http://michiganradio.org Helping fellow veterans Helping the family and friends of cancer patients http://michiganradio.org/post/helping-family-and-friends-cancer-patients <p>Nearly 1.6 million people in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer this year, according to the National Cancer Institute. Half-a-million people will die of cancer this year. But millions of others are affected by cancer in some way.&nbsp;</p><p>Wives, husbands, children, and friends of cancer patients can also face a crisis when a loved one is diagnosed and treated for cancer. As part of our weekly What&#39;s Working series, we spoke with Barb Hiltz, executive director of the Cancer Support Community of greater Ann Arbor. The organization works to help the family and friends of cancer patients. Mon, 14 Nov 2011 11:46:34 +0000 What's Working & Christina Shockley 4973 at http://michiganradio.org Helping the family and friends of cancer patients Kalamazoo foundation's equity fellowship targets racial disparities http://michiganradio.org/post/kalamazoo-foundations-equity-fellowship-targets-racial-disparities <p>In October of 2010 the Kalamazoo Community Foundation declared itself an anti-racist organization. But the foundation&#39;s leaders recognized it was going to take more than just a declaration to counteract persistent racial disparities.</p><p>Sharon Anderson, the foundation&#39;s Community Investment Officer, spoke with Michigan Radio&#39;s Tamar Charney.</p><p><em>&quot;We&#39;re looking at every aspect of our work to determine who is being left out. Who is not at the table, and why...so&nbsp;that whatever we do, we do from an informed perspective,&quot; s</em>aid Anderson.</p><p>The anti-racist program at the Kalamazoo Community Foundation was designed to include youths and youth-serving organizations. The foundation provides resources for youth organizations to develop after-school programs that build academic and social skills, and teach leadership and civic engagement.</p><p>The goal is more than equality, it&#39;s equity--identifying the gaps and taking action to ensure that every group has the opportunity to be successful. For Anderson that means fighting racial disparities by educating leaders and having an informed perspective when it comes to community development initiatives.</p><p><em>&quot;We struggled in the beginning--where should we start? And the lesson is, start anywhere and keep moving,&quot;&nbsp;</em>Anderson said.</p><p>-Meg Cramer-Michigan Radio Newsroom Mon, 07 Nov 2011 11:26:51 +0000 What's Working 4852 at http://michiganradio.org Kalamazoo foundation's equity fellowship targets racial disparities Aging gracefully with the creative arts http://michiganradio.org/post/aging-gracefully-creative-arts <p><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 16px; ">Every week on What&rsquo;s Working, we take a look at people and organizations that are changing lives in Michigan for the better.</em></p><p>http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/michigan/local-michigan-991790.mp3</p><p>The Luella Hannan Memorial Foundation in Detroit has been around for 75 years. People who work at the foundation describe it as a center for creative aging, an opportunity for seniors to learn new ways to creatively express themselves as they grow older.</p><p>Christina Shockely, host of Michigan Radio&#39;s Morning Edition, spoke with Rachel Jacobsen, the community development coordinator at the foundation.</p><p>Jacobsen said that proactive aging allows seniors<em> &quot;to exercise the more creative parts of their minds and bodies in ways that help them age well and also, hopefully, continue to develop into old age.&quot;</em> Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:30:31 +0000 Christina Shockley & What's Working 4761 at http://michiganradio.org Aging gracefully with the creative arts Program teaches adults literacy skills, how to read http://michiganradio.org/post/program-teaches-adults-literacy-skills-how-read <p><em>Every week on What&rsquo;s Working, we take a look at people and organizations that are changing lives in Michigan for the better.</em></p><p>Ken Lampar is the director of Macomb Literacy Partners, a program that helps adults learn to read and improve their literacy skills.</p><p>Nearly 70,000 adults in Macomb County are functionally illiterate, meaning they can&rsquo;t perform tasks like filling out a job application or reading a perscription. Though literacy rates <a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/interactive/patchworknation/stats/education/adult-literacy/mi/">vary across the state</a>, an estimated <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/naal/estimates/StateEstimates.aspx">8% of adults in Michigan</a> lack basic reading skills.</p><p> Mon, 24 Oct 2011 10:42:10 +0000 What's Working & Christina Shockley 4676 at http://michiganradio.org Program teaches adults literacy skills, how to read Job training in the kitchen for at-risk youth http://michiganradio.org/post/job-training-kitchen-risk-youth <p><em>Every week on What&rsquo;s Working, we take a look at people and organizations that are changing lives in Michigan for the better.</em></p><p>Food Gatherers, a Southeast Michigan food bank, offers a job training program for youth ages 17 to 24.</p><p>Some participants are currently managing a mental illness, others have children or are primary caregivers for younger siblings&mdash;all are at risk for homelessness.</p><p>Christina Shockley, host of Michigan Radio&rsquo;s Morning Edition, speaks with Mary Schlitt, director of development for Food Gatherers.</p> Mon, 17 Oct 2011 11:00:35 +0000 What's Working & Christina Shockley 4591 at http://michiganradio.org Job training in the kitchen for at-risk youth Reaching out to migrant communities with ESL classes http://michiganradio.org/post/reaching-out-migrant-communities-esl-classes <p>Every week on What&rsquo;s Working, we take a look at people and organizations that are changing lives in Michigan for the better. Mabel Rodriguez, the director of the Migrant Outreach Program at the University of Michigan, is helping the migrant community by bringing U of M students to the community to teach English.<br /><br />Rodriguez says that due to long hours and a limited ability to travel, members of the migrant community can not attend ESL (English as a Second Language) classes.</p> Mon, 10 Oct 2011 16:11:45 +0000 What's Working 4512 at http://michiganradio.org Reaching out to migrant communities with ESL classes Creating opportunities for girls to attend college http://michiganradio.org/post/creating-opportunities-girls-attend-college <p>Every Monday in our <a href="http://www.michiganradio.org/people/whats-working">What&rsquo;s Working</a> series, we talk to people and organizations across the state that are changing lives for the better. This week, we speak with Sue Schooner.</p><p>Schooner never liked kids, but she started volunteering with a girls group in Ann Arbor a few years back, and the young women found a way into her life... and they never left.&nbsp;</p><p>So, Schooner quit her job as an auto executive, and is now the executive director for &ldquo;<a href="http://www.girlsgroup.org/">Girls Group</a>,&rdquo; a program that mentors and supports high school girls, giving them the opportunities they need to attend college.</p><p><em>&ldquo;I think part of why the program is so successful is that we provide wraparound programming. So we have discussion groups every single Friday about parent communication, anger management, we have a very intensive college prep program which is basically available seven days a week,&rdquo; Schooner says.</em> Mon, 10 Oct 2011 10:41:44 +0000 What's Working & Christina Shockley 4506 at http://michiganradio.org Creating opportunities for girls to attend college Empowering Flint youth to improve communities http://michiganradio.org/post/empowering-flint-youth-improve-communities <p>Every week on What&rsquo;s Working, we take a look at people and organizations that are changing lives in Michigan for the better. The Michigan Youth Violence Prevention Center is targeting youth violence in Flint by getting kids involved in activities that improve their community.</p><p>Youth Empowerment Solutions (YES) is an after-school program run by the center that gives students the tools to initiate and manage community development projects. Today we speak with Susan Morrel-Samuels, the managing director of the Youth Violence Prevention Center at the University of Michigan, who tells us what&rsquo;s unique about the YES program. Mon, 26 Sep 2011 18:30:58 +0000 What's Working 4310 at http://michiganradio.org Empowering Flint youth to improve communities Creating safer routes to schools http://michiganradio.org/post/creating-safer-routes-schools <p>Governor Snyder wants us to get healthier. The Governor delivered a health address last week and part of his plan revolves around getting Michigan&#39;s kids healthier. During his speech, the Governor mentioned the &quot;Safe Routes to Schools&quot; initiative.</p><p>As part of our weekly &quot;<a href="http://www.michiganradio.org/people/whats-working">What&#39;s Working</a>&quot; series, we speak today with David Hornak, Principal of Horizon Elementary schools in Holt, Michigan. Hornak has enacted the &quot;Safe Routes to Schools&quot; program at his school. Mon, 19 Sep 2011 12:58:01 +0000 What's Working 4201 at http://michiganradio.org Creating safer routes to schools Creating 'zero-waste' events http://michiganradio.org/post/creating-zero-waste-events <p>Every Monday morning, we take a look at groups around the state that are trying to improve things in Michigan. Today, we hear from Samantha Schiebold, a third year undergrad at the University of Michigan who is also the project manager of the Student Sustainability Initiative at U of M. The group works to increase awareness of ways students can protect the environment.</p><p>One of the Initiative&rsquo;s biggest successes was hosting a zero waste U of M basketball game last year.</p> Mon, 12 Sep 2011 13:18:19 +0000 What's Working 4113 at http://michiganradio.org Creating 'zero-waste' events A community in Lansing takes care of its neighborhood http://michiganradio.org/post/community-lansing-takes-care-its-neighborhood <p>All this year, Michigan Radio has been spotlighting people and organizations that are trying to improve life in Michigan. In 2004, residents of the Averill Woods neighborhood in Lansing started an association. Their goal was, in part, to promote a positive quality of life, to help neighbors connect with each other, and to improve safety. We speak this morning with the President of the <a href="http://www.averillwoods.org/">Averill Woods Neighborhood Association</a>, Melissa Quon Huber.</p> Mon, 29 Aug 2011 11:15:25 +0000 What's Working 3943 at http://michiganradio.org A community in Lansing takes care of its neighborhood Bringing women together to help local non-profits http://michiganradio.org/post/bringing-women-together-help-local-non-profits <p>The Michigan Women&rsquo;s Dinner Initiative is a unique effort to raise money for women in need.</p><p>http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/michigan/local-michigan-982834.mp3</p><p>This is how it works:&nbsp; Women gather at someone&rsquo;s home, bring a dish to pass, and a check for the amount of money they&rsquo;d generally pay for a dinner at a restaurant. That money is then donated to a certain charity or group that helps women and children. The other upside, the women visit and enjoy the food they&rsquo;ve made to share. As part of our &quot;What&#39;s Working&quot; series, we spoke with Cate McClure, who runs the program. Mon, 22 Aug 2011 10:14:55 +0000 What's Working 3848 at http://michiganradio.org Bringing women together to help local non-profits Energy conservation in Detroit http://michiganradio.org/post/energy-conservation-detroit <p>&nbsp;</p><p>The &ldquo;<a href="https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&amp;pid=sites&amp;srcid=eW91dGhlbmVyZ3lzcXVhZC5vcmd8aXllcy1wb3J0YWx8Z3g6NDIxYTQ0Y2E0NDZiNjZmOQ">Detroit Youth Energy Squad</a>,&rdquo; or D-YES, teaches high school students about energy conservation. The students then visit homes in Detroit and make the homes more energy efficient. As part of our What&#39;s Working series, we spoke with Justin Schott, founder of the group.</p> Tue, 16 Aug 2011 10:29:26 +0000 What's Working 3771 at http://michiganradio.org Energy conservation in Detroit Finding help on top of a horse http://michiganradio.org/post/finding-help-top-horse <p>Therapeutic Riding, Inc., or TRI, uses horseback riding to help children and adults with disabilities.</p><p>Jody Scott, the president of TRI, lists cerebral palsy, autism, Down syndrome and multiple sclerosis as some of the disabilities TRI works with. Scott says, &ldquo;If there&rsquo;s some kind of challenge that an individual is facing, they will have an assessment to see if we would be a good fit.&rdquo;</p><p>One of the riders that Scott works with has multiple sclerosis, and benefits physically from riding. Scott says, &ldquo;[She] is able to, when the horse is moving, tighten up her core muscles so that she can balance correctly. Then she uses these same positions in her wheelchair, actually, to help hold her back up straight, and by sitting up straight it opens up her entire rib cage so she can breathe better.&rdquo;</p><p>Horseback riding also has mental benefits. Scott says, &ldquo;We have had some children who have never spoken a word, and their first words have been spoken while riding a horse at therapeutic riding.&rdquo; Tue, 09 Aug 2011 11:48:22 +0000 What's Working 3662 at http://michiganradio.org Tending a garden behind bars http://michiganradio.org/post/tending-garden-behind-bars <p>When you think of a prison, you probably envision an expanse of concrete, metal bars, and tall barbed wire fences. But, on the grounds of the <a href="http://www.michigan.gov/corrections/0,1607,7-119--116930--,00.html">Women&rsquo;s Huron Valley Correctional Facility</a> in Ypsilanti, there&rsquo;s also a huge garden. As part of our What&#39;s Working series, we speak with Ellen Baron, a horticulture instructor at the prison who teacher inmates how to plant crops. Once the food is grown, it&#39;s donated to a local food bank. Mon, 01 Aug 2011 14:06:25 +0000 What's Working 3552 at http://michiganradio.org Tending a garden behind bars