trees http://michiganradio.org en Harsh winter may have damaging effects on pine trees http://michiganradio.org/post/harsh-winter-may-have-damaging-effects-pine-trees <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">If you've been wondering why your favorite pine tree has been turning brown as the weather warms up, you can stop wondering and start blaming winter.</span></p><p>Bert Cregg is an associate professor in the horticulture department at Michigan State University. He joined us to explain what the snow, cold and wind has done to our conifer trees.&nbsp;</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.&nbsp;</em></p><p></p><p> Mon, 05 May 2014 20:44:04 +0000 Stateside Staff 17481 at http://michiganradio.org Harsh winter may have damaging effects on pine trees Students celebrate Earth Day by planting sequoia clones http://michiganradio.org/post/students-celebrate-earth-day-planting-sequoia-clones <p></p><p>Students in northern Michigan are planting clones of ancient sequoias today.</p><p>There's a grove of sequoias along the shores of Lake Michigan on the site of a former Morton Salt factory.</p><p>Sequoia trees are not native to Michigan, but this grove has grown in Manistee for more than 65 years when they were brought here from the West Coast. Now, those trees are going to take another trip, or their clones will.</p><p>Students who attend Interlochen Arts Academy are planting them on campus along Green Lake. The clones are from Archangel Ancient Tree Archive.</p><p>David Milarch is the group's co-founder. He says they’re planting clones of redwoods around the world today.</p><p>“Ninety-six percent of all of our redwoods have been cut down, butchered and sold,” Milarch says.</p><p>Here's a look at how the group collects genetic material from these old growth trees:</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" height="281" mozallowfullscreen="" src="//player.vimeo.com/video/54411074" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="500"></iframe></p><p>Both the Interlochen Center for the Arts and nearby Interlochen State Park have lost many trees recently due to disease and bug infestation.</p><p>Head park ranger Chris Stark has mixed feelings about the planting. He'd prefer to plant native varieties, such as the white pine.</p><p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 18:16:32 +0000 Sara Hoover 17311 at http://michiganradio.org Students celebrate Earth Day by planting sequoia clones MSU professor assessing the toll of December's ice storm on trees http://michiganradio.org/post/msu-professor-assessing-toll-decembers-ice-storm-trees <p>The late December ice storm that knocked out power to more than half a million Michigan utility customers also damaged many of the state’s trees.</p><p></p><p>A preliminary study being released today takes a look at that damage.</p><p></p><p>Professor&nbsp;<a href="http://www.plantbiology.msu.edu/faculty/faculty-research/frank-w-telewski/">Frank Telewski </a>was busy Monday, crunching numbers for his presentation today to a conference of state arborists.</p><p></p> Tue, 11 Feb 2014 11:15:00 +0000 Steve Carmody 16384 at http://michiganradio.org MSU professor assessing the toll of December's ice storm on trees Managers at Sleeping Bear Dunes want take down more diseased Beech trees http://michiganradio.org/post/managers-sleeping-bear-dunes-want-take-down-more-diseased-beech-trees <p>For a beech tree, the end comes in two parts.</p><p>It starts with the wooly beech scale opening up a wound, then a fungus gets into that wound and can eventually kill the tree (either by girdling it or by weakening it until it falls over).</p><p>The disease has been around in Canada and parts of the U.S. for more than a century. <a href="http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/newtown_square/publications/technical_reports/pdfs/2005/331papers/heyd331.pdf">It was discovered in Michigan in 2000</a>.</p> Fri, 17 Jan 2014 17:42:59 +0000 Mark Brush 16070 at http://michiganradio.org Managers at Sleeping Bear Dunes want take down more diseased Beech trees Michigan non-profit says it has cloned John Muir's giant sequoia http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-non-profit-says-it-has-cloned-john-muirs-giant-sequoia <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Michigan-based</span><a href="http://www.ancienttreearchive.org/" style="line-height: 1.5;"> Archangel Ancient Tree Archive</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> announced this week that it has successfully cloned a giant sequoia tree planted by renown conservationist John Muir.</span></p><p>About 130 years ago, Muir transplanted the tree from Yosemite to his home in Martinez, California.&nbsp; Now 75 feet tall, the tree suffers from two fatal fungal diseases.</p><p>Archangel's co-founder David Milarch said a forester from the John Muir National Historic Site sent cuttings from the sick tree to Archangel.</p><p> Tue, 05 Nov 2013 20:08:28 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 15139 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan non-profit says it has cloned John Muir's giant sequoia City officials ask residents to water stressed street trees http://michiganradio.org/post/city-officials-ask-residents-water-stressed-street-trees <p>City officials in Holland, Grand Rapids and Ann Arbor are asking for a little help from residents. They&#39;re asking people to start watering trees along city streets &ndash; the ones between the curb and the sidewalk.&nbsp;</p><p>Kerry Gray is an Urban Forestry &amp; Natural Resources Planner with the City of Ann Arbor.</p><p>&quot;Most of the trees are currently really under a lot of stress.&nbsp; So we would obviously love people to water the street trees but we&rsquo;d also love them to pay attention to the trees on private property as well.&quot;</p><p>She says trees need water immediately if you see wilting or curling leaves and if leaves or needles are dropping off.&nbsp; Newly planted trees are especially at risk.</p><p>Here are some <a href="http://www.a2gov.org/government/publicservices/fieldoperations/forestry/Pages/Forestry.aspx">guidelines the Ann Arbor city foresters recommend</a> for watering trees:</p><ul><li>The morning hours are usually the best time to water</li><li>Slow, deep soakings are better than frequent light watering for both newly planted trees and established trees</li><li><span>For <em><strong><span>newly planted trees and small trees up to 4&quot;, </span></strong></em>a good watering is 10 gallons per inch of tree diameter applied in the mulched area around the tree, once per week.&nbsp; A 3&quot; diameter tree would need 30 gallons of water (3&quot; x 10 gallons).&nbsp; Newly planted trees should be watered weekly during the first 3 growing seasons. </span></li><li><span>For <em><strong><span>established medium trees (5&quot;-12&quot;),</span></strong></em> a general guideline for watering during prolonged dry periods&nbsp;is 10 gallons of water for every 1 inch diameter,&nbsp;three times&nbsp;per month.&nbsp; For example, an 8&quot; diameter tree will need 80 gallons of water.&nbsp; To water, place a sprinkler or soaker&nbsp;hose in the dripline of the tree.&nbsp; The dripline is the outer extent of the branch spread.&nbsp; Move the sprinkler/hose around to ensure that&nbsp;all the roots in the dripline are watered.&nbsp;</span></li><li>For<strong><em> large trees (greater than 13&quot;)</em></strong>, 15 gallons of water for every inch of diameter, two times per month during prolonged dry periods. A 14&quot; tree would need 210 gallons of water. To water, use the method described above for medium trees. For established trees, do not water within 3 feet of the trunk; this can lead to root rot.</li><li><span>In normal precipitation years, mother nature provides the water an established tree needs and supplemental watering is typically&nbsp;not necessary.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></li></ul><p> Tue, 17 Jul 2012 13:00:00 +0000 Rebecca Williams 8271 at http://michiganradio.org City officials ask residents to water stressed street trees Northern Michigan man clones ancient trees http://michiganradio.org/post/northern-michigan-man-clones-ancient-trees <p><em>by Peter Payette for The Environment Report</em></p><p>There&rsquo;s a new book out today about an unusual conservation project based in northern Michigan.&nbsp; For most of the last two decades, a man from Copemish has been cloning old trees around the world.&nbsp; David Milarch believes the genetics of these trees are superior and could be useful in the era of climate change.&nbsp; The author of the book says he might have a point.&nbsp;</p><p>Back in the year 2000, an elm tree not far from David Milarch&rsquo;s home was diagnosed with Dutch elm disease.</p><p>It was not just any elm.</p><p>It was the National Champion American elm at the time. That means it was the largest known elm in the country. Milarch tried to heal the tree with a soil treatment but it died. He did manage to clone the Buckley elm.</p><p>Today at the Archangel Ancient Tree Archive, there are about a dozen copies of the tree.</p><p>&quot;Here&rsquo;s the Buckley elm, the greatest elm in America.&nbsp; And it&rsquo;s living on and it can be utilized. That&rsquo;s really what it&rsquo;s all about.&quot;</p><p> Tue, 17 Apr 2012 13:00:01 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 7063 at http://michiganradio.org Northern Michigan man clones ancient trees Cutting down a Christmas tree in the national forest http://michiganradio.org/post/cutting-down-christmas-tree-national-forest <p>Most of us get our Christmas trees from a lot or a farm.</p><p>But if you have a saw and five bucks, you can cut down a tree in the national forest. Peter Payette took his family out to do it the old fashioned way and sent this report:</p><p>It&rsquo;s true that five bucks is not much to pay for a tree, but it&rsquo;ll cost you some time and gas money to get there.</p><p>The first stop is at a <a href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/hmnf/home/?cid=STELPRDB5275181">U.S. Forest Service office to buy a tag</a>.</p><p>There&rsquo;s one in Cadillac where Dianne Berry sells us our tags and helps us get our bearings.</p><p>&ldquo;This is a two sided map... the other side has the area closest to Manistee. And on the Huron-Manistee we have almost a million acres.&rdquo;</p><p>That means there are 500,000 acres of trees just on this side of the state, between Cadillac and Big Rapids!</p><p> Tue, 13 Dec 2011 15:50:33 +0000 Rebecca Williams 5365 at http://michiganradio.org Cutting down a Christmas tree in the national forest New DNR advisory council weighted toward timber interests http://michiganradio.org/post/new-dnr-advisory-council-weighted-toward-timber-interests <p>There&rsquo;s a shakeup in managing Michigan&rsquo;s forests.</p><p>A new advisory council is heavily weighted with voices from the timber industry, and there will be more emphasis on developing forest products to boost the state&rsquo;s economy.</p><p>Governor Rick Snyder says there&rsquo;s a lot of potential to use natural resources to bring in more revenue.</p><p>The head of the Department of Natural Resources has just appointed a new ten member forest advisory council. Eight of the ten members are connected to the timber industry.</p><p>The new council will focus on developing logging and lumber, pulp and paper, and biofuels. An existing forest management advisory group includes other interests such as wildlife, recreation and conservation as well as logging.</p><p>Marvin Roberson with the Sierra Club says those other voices largely will be gone from the new council.</p><p>&ldquo;I think this is going to mean a lack of management for natural conservation values and an increase in management for timber-only values,&rdquo; said Roberson.</p><p>The DNR also is reorganizing its forestry division so that come January it will no longer deal with oil, gas and minerals or recreation on state forestland.</p><p><em>-Bob Allen for The Environment Report</em> Thu, 08 Dec 2011 14:50:40 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 5299 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan cities take a tree census http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-cities-take-tree-census <p>Grand Rapids, Adrian and Ann Arbor are taking part in a tree study that could help other Michigan cities assess their own urban forests. The goal is to make a tree assessment more accurate and affordable for cities.</p><p>Grand Rapids spent tens of thousands of dollars to find more information about the city&rsquo;s trees. They came away with valuable information like how much greenhouse gases and water runoff the trees absorb. But city owned trees make up only a tiny portion of the overall urban forest in Grand Rapids.</p><p>Tyler Stevenson is the city forester. He says they discovered more than half of Grand Rapids&rsquo; trees are maples.</p><blockquote><p>&ldquo;Is that true for the entire community? We don&rsquo;t know. And it&rsquo;d be interesting information and it would also help to increase the awareness of the public on how valuable the trees on their property are.&rdquo;</p></blockquote><p>Federal officials will use the data from the study to enhance existing software. Other communities in Michigan will be able to use that software for free to calculate data about their own trees.</p><p> Tue, 13 Sep 2011 15:38:21 +0000 Lindsey Smith 4133 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan cities take a tree census DuPont promises to reimburse homeowners for trees killed by herbicide http://michiganradio.org/post/dupont-promises-reimburse-homeowners-trees-killed-herbicide <p>A few months ago, reports started coming in that an herbicide made by DuPont was hurting and killing trees. The Environmental Protection Agency recently ordered DuPont to stop selling the herbicide Imprelis. DuPont had suspended sales shortly before that. The herbicide was used by lawn care companies to kill weeds on lawns and golf courses starting last fall.</p><p>Bert Cregg is an associate professor of horticulture at Michigan State University.</p><p>He says Imprelis can cause a range of different injuries to blue spruce, Norway spruce and white pine.</p><blockquote><p>&ldquo;You might see like in a big white pine, you might see a little bit of top growth doesn&rsquo;t look quite right, you&rsquo;ll see the twisting and curling, stunting of the top of the tree, in other cases, yeah we&rsquo;ve seen the tree killed outright.&rdquo;</p></blockquote><p>This week, DuPont announced a <a href="http://www.imprelis-facts.com/">program to process damage claims</a> from property owners. DuPont declined an interview. But in a statement, the company said property owners with approved claims will receive replacement trees &ndash; or cash compensation.</p><p>DuPont&rsquo;s also facing a number of lawsuits, including a <a href="http://www.detnews.com/article/20110901/METRO/109010456/1409/METRO">class action suit</a> brought by a woman from Allen Park, Michigan.</p><p> Thu, 08 Sep 2011 15:40:17 +0000 Rebecca Williams 4074 at http://michiganradio.org DuPont promises to reimburse homeowners for trees killed by herbicide Michigan companies sue DuPont for damaged trees http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-companies-sue-dupont-damaged-trees <p>UPDATE: 4:15 p.m. July 28, 2011</p><p>DuPont says its herbicide called Imprelis is responsible for tree injuries primarily on Norway spruce and white pines. They are addressing problems on a case by case basis.</p><p>ORIGINAL POST: 3:31 July 25, 2011</p><p>Three Michigan companies are suing <a href="http://www2.dupont.com/DuPont_Home/en_US/index.html">DuPont </a>for damages to trees on their property. It&rsquo;s the first of at least four lawsuits against the chemical company. Damages linked to a DuPont-manufactured herbicide called <a href="http://www2.dupont.com/Professional_Products/en_US/Products_and_Services/Imprelis/index.html">Imprelis</a> have been linked to dead and dying trees across the country. The <a href="http://www.epa.gov/">Environmental Protection Agency</a> (EPA) approved the chemical in 2010. Lawn care professionals say they&rsquo;ve received complaints despite using Imprelis as directed. The EPA and DuPont are investigating claims.</p><p>Amy Frankmann is with the <a href="http://www.mnla.org/">Michigan Nursery and Landscape Association</a>. She says not only are trees suffering &ndash; so are the reputations of landscapers.</p><blockquote><p>&quot;The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development has gone out and investigated the claims that we&rsquo;ve heard about and our members have done nothing wrong. So they&rsquo;ve applied it according to label and our concern is that the industry is getting a black eye when they didn&rsquo;t do anything wrong,&quot; Frankmann said.</p></blockquote><p>Repairs for damages nationwide are projected to be in the millions of dollars.</p><p><em>- Amelia Carpenter - Michigan Radio Newsroom</em> Mon, 25 Jul 2011 19:31:28 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 3454 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan companies sue DuPont for damaged trees Group rushes to clone trees http://michiganradio.org/post/group-rushes-clone-trees <p>A nonprofit organization is rushing to clone some of the world&#39;s biggest and oldest trees in an audacious plan to restore forests that could help cleanse the environment and fight climate change.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>The <a href="http://www.ancienttreearchive.org">Archangel Ancient Tree Archive</a> is based in Copemish, MI. The group has tracked down and made genetic copies of &quot;champion&quot; members of more than 60 species. Among them are redwoods and giant sequoias from California&#39;s northern coast and oaks up to 1,000 years old from Ireland.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Co-founder David Milarch says the group is focusing on 200 species that perform ecologically valuable jobs such as absorbing toxic chemicals and storing carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Archangel hopes to sell millions of its trees for replanting in cities and rural areas.</p> Sun, 13 Mar 2011 18:47:57 +0000 Kyle Norris 1628 at http://michiganradio.org Group rushes to clone trees Grand Rapids puts a price tag on city trees http://michiganradio.org/post/grand-rapids-puts-price-tag-city-trees <p>The City of Grand Rapids is working to revive its urban forest. <a href="http://environmentreport.org/show.php?showID=505">Lindsey Smith visited the committee</a> in charge of the effort to find out how things are going.</p><p>Three things to know about trees in Grand Rapids:</p><ol><li>The committee values the 61,000 trees within the city’s boundaries at $71 million.&nbsp; (How'd they get that number?&nbsp; It's based on the benefits trees provide: capturing storm water runoff, increasing property values, improving air quality and reducing heating and cooling costs for nearby buildings.)</li><li>In 2010, more than 1,500 trees were planted in Grand Rapids.</li><li>This year they’re working to add a wider variety of native trees - to better protect the urban forest from new pests and disease.&nbsp; (i.e. things like the uber-destructive emerald ash borer)</li></ol><p>Lindsey talked with Dottie Clune, the committee chair.&nbsp; She says the importance of trees is often overlooked - especially these days with tight city budgets.</p><blockquote><p>“We know that for every dollar we spent on the municipal urban forestry program we received $3.60 in benefits. That’s a pretty good return on investment.”</p></blockquote><p><a href="http://www.arborday.org/trees/benefits.cfm"> Thu, 10 Feb 2011 16:33:20 +0000 Rebecca Williams 1238 at http://michiganradio.org Grand Rapids puts a price tag on city trees