antibiotics http://michiganradio.org en Dairy to fight court-ordered vet inspections despite antibiotic violations http://michiganradio.org/post/dairy-fight-court-ordered-vet-inspections-despite-antibiotic-violations <p>A West Michigan dairy farm that sold cows for slaughter&nbsp; with illegal levels of antibiotics will be in court Monday.</p><p>Scenic View Dairy has about 10,000 cows at its five farms. The dairy has been repeatedly warned about selling cows with excessive levels of antibiotics, but it says public health was never at risk.</p><p>Now Scenic View is fighting an order requiring veterinarians to diagnose all sick cattle at its farms.</p><p>Professor Dan Grooms is with Michigan State University&#39;s College of Veterinary Medicine. He said state inspectors used to do that work, but because of budget cuts, farm employees or members of milk co-ops do it now.</p><p><em>&ldquo;They train them how to -- if it&rsquo;s something that looks unusual -- that&rsquo;s when you need to be calling me as a veterinarian,&quot;</em> Grooms said. <em>&quot;So they train them to recognize common diseases, and then the appropriate intervention strategy for that disease.&quot;</em></p><p>Drug residues in food can lead to long-term resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. Sun, 30 Oct 2011 18:00:00 +0000 Rina Miller 4753 at http://michiganradio.org Dairy to fight court-ordered vet inspections despite antibiotic violations Feds win lawsuit over drugs in Michigan cows http://michiganradio.org/post/feds-win-lawsuit-over-drugs-michigan-cows <p>HAMILTON, Mich. (AP) - A judge says a western Michigan farm violated federal law by selling cows for slaughter with illegal levels of antibiotics.</p><p>Judge Gordon Quist ruled in favor of regulators who say Scenic View Dairy in Allegan County repeatedly ignored warnings about selling the cows for human consumption.</p><p>Quist didn&#39;t order a penalty last week and says he doesn&#39;t want to put Scenic View out of business. The judge told the farm and the government to come up with an agreement by the end of September.</p><p>Scenic View&#39;s primary business is milk but about 70 cows a week are sent to slaughter for human consumption. The farm claims there are exceptions to the government&#39;s drug rules. But the judge says<br />they don&#39;t fit. Wed, 07 Sep 2011 19:03:16 +0000 The Associated Press 4062 at http://michiganradio.org Too many doctors still prescribing antibiotics for viral infections http://michiganradio.org/post/too-many-doctors-still-prescribing-antibiotics-viral-infections <p>A new study says overuse of antibiotics is still a big problem, fifteen years after the Centers for Disease Control began a campaign to stop the practice.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Marianne Udow-Phillips&nbsp;is head of the University of Michigan&rsquo;s Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation.&nbsp; She says antibiotics do not work for viral infections.&nbsp; And&nbsp;the more physicians&nbsp;over-prescribe&nbsp;antibiotics, the more&nbsp;pathogens will&nbsp;develop resistance to the drugs.&nbsp;&nbsp;But she says&nbsp;patients and doctors alike haven&rsquo;t gotten the message. Udow-Phillips says:</p><blockquote><p>&quot;We&rsquo;re just sick for a long time and we just want that magic pill to fix us... But if we have a virus, an antibiotic is not gonna help.&nbsp; And sometimes physicians cave in to the pressure from families who say, &#39;just do something&#39;.&quot;</p></blockquote><p>Udow-Phillips says drug-resistant staph has become a huge problem.&nbsp; In fact,&nbsp;more Americans&nbsp;die every year from antibiotic-resistant staph infections than AIDS.&nbsp;</p><p>The practice of overprescribing the drugs is a bigger problem in some parts of Michigan than others, the study found.&nbsp; In Holland, only about 10% of children who saw a doctor for an upper respiratory viral infection&nbsp;were given a prescription for antibiotics.</p><p>But in West Branch, nearly 68% of children with upper respiratory infections were given a prescription for an antibiotic.</p><p>Udow-Phillips thinks the differences in prescription rates is most likely&nbsp;because the CDC campaign focused on pediatricians rather than family physicians or internal medicine specialists.&nbsp; She says&nbsp;more children may be seeing family physicians in areas like West Branch.</p><p>Udow-Phillips says the worst part of it is, physicians are often over-prescribing so-called &quot;broad spectrum&quot; antibiotics, when &quot;narrow spectrum&quot; antibiotics would, at least, do less harm. Mon, 28 Feb 2011 23:24:57 +0000 Tracy Samilton 1455 at http://michiganradio.org Too many doctors still prescribing antibiotics for viral infections