Lead poisoning http://michiganradio.org en Researchers say childhood lead exposure costs $300 million a year in Michigan http://michiganradio.org/post/researchers-say-childhood-lead-exposure-costs-300-million-year-michigan <p>Childhood lead exposure costs Michigan about $300 million a year.</p><p>That's according to <a href="http://www.mnceh.org/sites/www.mnceh.org/files/mnceh/press-releases/Lead_Cost_Report_MI_2014_smaller.pdf">a report by the University of Michigan and the Michigan Network for Children’s Environmental Health</a>.</p><p>They recommend lead remediation projects for around 100,000 houses throughout the state at a cost of $600 million. They say the program would pay for itself in three years.</p><p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Paul </span>Haan<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> is executive director of the Healthy Homes Coalition of West Michigan. He says more remediation programs would be a good long-term investment for the state.&nbsp;</span></p><p>“At the end of the day we’re going to continue to pay the cost of the problem of lead poisoning if older housing is not remediated,” said Haan.</p><p>“So the question we really need to ask ourselves is do we want to pay the increased cost of suffering the consequences, or do we want to pay the lower cost of remediation?”</p><p>About 70% of childhood lead exposure comes from lead-based paint in older homes.</p><p>Earlier this week, the state Legislature approved an additional $500,000 for lead hazard control in next year’s state budget. The change is pending approval from the governor.</p><p>Haan says this shows that “public will is building and that state leadership recognizes the need for the kind of investments called for in the report.”&nbsp;</p><p><i style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: normal;">– Reem Nasr, Michigan Radio Newsroom</i></p><p></p><p> Wed, 11 Jun 2014 20:20:41 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 17956 at http://michiganradio.org Researchers say childhood lead exposure costs $300 million a year in Michigan Lester Graham's upcoming documentary, "Growing up in Poverty and Pollution" http://michiganradio.org/post/lester-grahams-upcoming-documentary-growing-poverty-and-pollution <p></p><p>Children growing up in poverty face huge challenges. One challenge that might not come to the top of the mind, though, is pollution.</p><p>As part of Michigan Radio's State of Opportunity project, reporter Lester Graham spent the past three months exploring the problem.</p><p>His documentary, "Growing up in Poverty and Pollution," will air tomorrow at 3 p.m. on Michigan Radio.</p><p>Lester joined us today to talk about his project.</p><p><em>*Listen to the audio above.</em></p><p> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 21:37:15 +0000 Stateside Staff 17336 at http://michiganradio.org Lester Graham's upcoming documentary, "Growing up in Poverty and Pollution" Lead poisoning is still damaging Michigan kids http://michiganradio.org/post/lead-poisoning-still-damaging-michigan-kids <p></p><p>There‘s one kind of pollution that researchers believe robs kids of their future like no other.</p><p>Scientists have found evidence it diminishes their intelligence, causes behavioral problems, even increases the likelihood they’ll end up in prison.</p><p>This toxin’s damage is known.</p><p>We even know how to protect children from being exposed to it.</p><p>Yet tens of thousands of Michigan children are poisoned by lead every day.</p> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 19:34:36 +0000 Lester Graham 17337 at http://michiganradio.org Lead poisoning is still damaging Michigan kids Number of Detroit kids with elevated lead levels drops, but problems remain http://michiganradio.org/post/number-detroit-kids-elevated-lead-levels-drops-problems-remain <p>The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say even low levels of<a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/"> lead in blood</a> can affect a child’s IQ, their ability to pay attention and their performance in school. Kids are most often exposed to lead in paint in homes built before 1978.</p><p>Robert Scott is with the Michigan Department of Community Health. He says over the past several years, there’s been great progress in cleaning up lead contamination in old homes in the state. He says lead poisoning in kids in Detroit has dropped more than 70 percent since 2004.</p><p>“I do want to emphasize though, that with this steady decrease over the years, there are still pockets in Detroit and other places where the rates are still much higher,” says Scott.</p><p> Tue, 05 Mar 2013 17:17:56 +0000 Rebecca Williams 11525 at http://michiganradio.org Number of Detroit kids with elevated lead levels drops, but problems remain UM study links lower MEAP scores with lead exposure http://michiganradio.org/post/um-study-links-lower-meap-scores-lead-exposure <p>A study by researchers at the University of Michigan links lead exposure in children to lower achievement on standardized tests.</p><p>It's published in the March issue of the American Journal of Public Health.&nbsp; Click <a href="http://mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/michigan/files/201302/AJPH.2012.pdf">here to read the study</a>.&nbsp;</p><p>From the study:</p><blockquote><p>Detroit has an extensive lead poisoning problem. Although only 20% of Michigan’s children younger than 5 years lived in Detroit in 2010, childhood lead poisoning in Detroit has consistently accounted for more than 50 percent of the state’s total lead burden.</p></blockquote><p><a href="http://www.freep.com/article/20130225/NEWS06/302250140/High-lead-poisoning-linked-to-lower-test-scores-in-DPS?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|FRONTPAGE">Detroit Free Press reporter Keith Matheny's article</a> explores the research further and the schools affected.</p><blockquote><p>The greater the lead poisoning in a Detroit Public Schools student's blood, the higher the likelihood he or she will do poorly on achievement tests -- even after accounting for contributing factors such as poverty. That's the finding of a collaborative study that provides one of the most detailed assessments yet of the impact of lead poisoning on students' learning ability. Mon, 25 Feb 2013 21:32:19 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom & Sarah Cwiek 11402 at http://michiganradio.org UM study links lower MEAP scores with lead exposure Lead exposure affects kids' motor development http://michiganradio.org/post/lead-exposure-affects-kids-motor-development <p>New research from the University of Michigan reinforces why it&rsquo;s important to keep kids from being exposed to lead.</p><p>It&rsquo;s long been known that relatively high blood lead levels can negatively affect children&rsquo;s IQ.</p><p>This study finds it can also affect a child&rsquo;s motor skills.</p><p>Dr. Howard Hu, a professor of environmental health sciences at the University of Michigan, studied children between the ages of three and seven in Chennai, India. Half the children studied had relatively high levels of lead in their blood. Those children tested significantly lower on motor skill tests&hellip; like using peg boards and copying pictures&hellip; than children with far less exposure to lead.</p><p>Dr. Hu says the Indian children&rsquo;s blood lead levels are about two to three times that of American children. Lead is still a problem in Michigan, with children still being exposed to aging lead paint in homes, lead in pipes, and lead contamination in soil.</p><p> Tue, 06 Sep 2011 15:11:11 +0000 Steve Carmody 4039 at http://michiganradio.org Grand Rapids takes on lead poisoning http://michiganradio.org/post/grand-rapids-takes-lead-poisoning <p>Grand Rapids is celebrating the success of a program aimed at preventing lead-poisoning. Michigan Radio&rsquo;s Lindsey Smith reports the number of cases of lead poisoning in Grand Rapids has fallen 75-percent since the program began.</p><p>Lead poisoning poses serious health risks for children under six-years-old. Lead-based paint is a hazard in homes built before 1978. Grand Rapids Mayor George Heartwell says more than 85-percent of houses in the city were built before then.</p> Fri, 08 Jul 2011 15:49:59 +0000 Lindsey Smith 3208 at http://michiganradio.org Grand Rapids takes on lead poisoning