phil pavlov http://michiganradio.org en State Senate passes bill to protect gun owners’ “fundamental right" to privacy http://michiganradio.org/post/state-senate-passes-bill-protect-gun-owners-fundamental-right-privacy <p>Some records about gun owners in Michigan would be shielded from the public under a <a href="http://www.legislature.mi.gov/documents/2013-2014/billanalysis/Senate/pdf/2013-SFA-0834-G.pdf">bill that passed the state Senate Thursday. </a>The bills had overwhelming bipartisan support. Only two state senators voted against the package.</p><p>If passed, the measure would change who can access information, like a person’s name and address, from pistol license applications and a database that tracks pistol histories.</p><p>Republican State Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, introduced the bill to protect what he calls gun owners’ “fundamental right" to privacy.</p><p>“When it comes time for releasing information on gun ownership, we just believe that that deserves a different level of protection and it shouldn’t be public information,” Pavlov said.</p><p>The public and the press would lose that access, but police would not.</p><p>“If there’s suspicion of a crime that a gun was used in, those are all ways that you can access the system. So law enforcement, certainly they need it for law enforcement purposes. It’s not something that needs to be public information on the streets,” Pavlov said.</p><p>The bill comes in response to a New York state newspaper that published information about registered gun owners there. He wanted to prevent it from happening in Michigan.</p><p>The bill now heads to the state House.</p><p> Thu, 24 Apr 2014 21:32:48 +0000 Lindsey Smith 17353 at http://michiganradio.org State Senate passes bill to protect gun owners’ “fundamental right" to privacy The astonishing hypocrisy of Medicaid opponents http://michiganradio.org/post/astonishing-hypocrisy-medicaid-opponents <p>You know by now that the Michigan Senate has finally voted to approve expanding Medicaid benefits.</p><p>The vote, which came Tuesday night after months of struggle, means that eventually nearly half a million of our citizens will have at least basic health care, people who don’t have it now.</p><p>The cost to the state itself will be nothing for three years, and only a pittance afterwards. The benefits in terms of human decency and a healthier workforce, enormous.</p><p>Those who opposed Medicaid expansion said they didn’t think we should burden future generations with another “entitlement cost.” Many of them also admitted their opposition was based on their hatred of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, which they continue to oppose even though it was passed by Congress, passed Constitutional muster with the Supreme Court, and essentially ratified by the voters in last year‘s presidential election. Thu, 29 Aug 2013 13:47:28 +0000 Jack Lessenberry 14187 at http://michiganradio.org The astonishing hypocrisy of Medicaid opponents Commentary: Gun laws and forgetting our history http://michiganradio.org/post/commentary-gun-laws-and-forgetting-our-history <p>Pretty much everyone remembers George Santayana’s famous saying that those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. I’m pretty sure he wasn’t talking about the Republicans in Michigan’s state senate, but he could have been.</p><p>Real life is different from fiction. In the real world, things happen that are just too crazy for anyone to make up. And if there’s any political question that we can say has been settled for all time, it is that federal law always trumps state law. When they conflict, federal law is the law.</p><p> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 13:36:21 +0000 Jack Lessenberry 10863 at http://michiganradio.org Commentary: Gun laws and forgetting our history Michigan lawmakers seek to revive Civilian Conservation Corps http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-lawmakers-seek-revive-civilian-conservation-corps <p>Some Michigan lawmakers hope to restore a program that would put young adults to work on public works projects—but without costing taxpayers any money.</p><p>The state Senate recently approved legislation to resurrect the Michigan Civilian Conservation Corps.&nbsp; &nbsp;</p><p>The legislation would fund the MCCC through a public-private partnership. Bill sponsors say no taxpayer dollars would be involved.</p><p>The bills were supported by commanding bi-partisan majorities in the Senate.</p> Mon, 22 Oct 2012 21:33:16 +0000 Jake Neher 9563 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan lawmakers seek to revive Civilian Conservation Corps A comeback for the Civilian Conservation Corps in Michigan? http://michiganradio.org/post/comeback-civilian-conservation-corps-michigan <p>Michigan’s Civilian Conservation Corps could make a comeback under new legislation in the state Senate.</p><p>The MCCC puts unemployed young adults to work on conservation projects on state land.</p><p>After years struggling to survive on dwindling support from the state, some lawmakers say it’s time to revive the program as a public-private partnership.</p><p>Republican Senator Phil Pavlov says it’s all about getting young people into the workforce.<br><br>"We want to be able to develop programs that, even on the graduate level, where some of the more better-trained college kids have an opportunity to get on a career path whether that is in remediation or more sophisticated forms of conservation," says Pavlov.<br><br>Pavlov says the plan would not include any taxpayer dollars. Thu, 13 Sep 2012 17:45:16 +0000 Jake Neher 9073 at http://michiganradio.org A comeback for the Civilian Conservation Corps in Michigan? Republicans introduce their education reform effort http://michiganradio.org/post/republicans-introduce-their-education-reform-effort <p>Michigan Republican legislators introduced legislation this week that they say will reform education in Michigan. The legislators call the seven bills they introduced the &quot;Parent Empowerment Education Reform&quot; package.</p><p>The bills have been referred to the Senate Education Committee.</p><p>Eartha Jane Melzer of the <a href="http://michiganmessenger.com/52342/gop-plan-to-privatize-teaching-unprecedented">Michigan Messenger</a> summed up the effort this way:&nbsp;</p><blockquote><p>The <a href="http://senate.michigan.gov/committees/Default.aspx?commid=51">seven bill package</a> would remove limits on the number of charter and cyber schools, allow parents and teachers to force schools to convert into charters, and let districts hire teachers through private companies.</p><p>It also imposes new requirements on schools, specifying that students be allowed to simultaneously enroll in high school and college courses beginning in the 9th grade, that schools accept students from out of district, and that services be provided for homeschoolers and private school students.</p></blockquote><p>In a <a href="http://www.senate.mi.gov/gop/senators/readarticle.asp?id=4253&amp;District=25">statement</a> on his website, State Senator Phil Pavlov (R-St. Clair Township), and the chair of the Senate Education Committee said he and his colleagues are following through on Governor Snyder&#39;s request to &quot;expand the schools of choice program, empower parents and ensure that every student has access to a quality education.&quot;</p><p>From Pavlov&#39;s statement:</p><blockquote><p>&quot;Every parent in the state wants the very best for their children,&quot; said Pavlov.&nbsp; &quot;Unfortunately, when it comes to educating our kids, adult issues too often get in the way.&nbsp; The Parent Empowerment Education Reform package is about freeing parents to pursue the opportunities that work best for their children and giving schools the freedom they need to innovate and excel.&quot;</p></blockquote><p>The <a href="http://www.mea.org/more-same-senate-introduces-anti-public-education-bills">Michigan Education Association</a> published a statement calling the reforms an &quot;attack on public education&quot; and an attempt to privatize the system:</p><blockquote><p>Many of the concepts introduced in these bills were first mentioned by Gov. Snyder in his education message this spring. But it&#39;s apparent that the attacks on public education continue. None of these bills are meant to improve education. This is more of the same push to destroy public education: schools run by private entities, back-door vouchers, policies based on rhetoric rather than research, and more state mandates -- despite the Republican cut of $1 billion from public schools earlier this year. Fri, 09 Sep 2011 16:48:06 +0000 Mark Brush 4093 at http://michiganradio.org Republicans introduce their education reform effort State Senate introduces more sweeping education reforms http://michiganradio.org/post/state-senate-introduces-more-sweeping-education-reforms <p>A state Senate panel began hearings yesterday on a package of sweeping education reforms. This is the second round of major changes proposed to Michigan&rsquo;s education system this year.</p><p>The package of bills include measures that would allow more charter schools in the state, allow schools to hire teachers from private companies, and require districts to open empty seats in classrooms to students who live outside of the area.</p><p>Representatives from the education community say the proposals are controversial. Senate Education Committee Chairman Phil Pavlov says, he does not think so.</p><blockquote><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m not sure I&rsquo;d use the word &lsquo;controversial,&rsquo; I mean we having a conversation about choice for parents and students in the state and that shouldn&rsquo;t be controversial,&rdquo; Pavlov says.</p></blockquote><p>Pavlov also took the lead on the debate over teacher tenure reform earlier this year. Pavlov says Governor Snyder supports some of the reforms. Pavlov says he does not have a timeline to get this round of education reforms through the Legislature.</p><p>Representatives from the education community say they are concerned these proposals are based on politics and not research of successful education reforms. Thu, 08 Sep 2011 10:23:23 +0000 Laura Weber 4070 at http://michiganradio.org