vocational training http://michiganradio.org en Michigan's schools can learn a thing or two from Macomb Community College http://michiganradio.org/post/michigans-schools-can-learn-thing-or-two-macomb-community-college <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">When it comes to education, there are two things on which pretty much everyone agrees. We need more of it, and we need to make it more affordable.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">But there’s a third thing, too.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">We need to make it relevant.</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Learning for learning’s sake is a good and sacred thing, but today’s generation also needs education that will lead to jobs, in most cases, sooner rather than later.</span></p><p>For years, I’ve been intrigued by a place that seems to have gotten something very right: Macomb Community College.</p><p> Wed, 14 May 2014 15:40:51 +0000 Jack Lessenberry 17596 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan's schools can learn a thing or two from Macomb Community College Michigan high school curriculum could be changing - for better or worse? http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-high-school-curriculum-could-be-changing-better-or-worse <p>Education is front and center these days in Michigan.</p><p>Governor Snyder spoke today to a summit of education leaders, calling for businesses to get more closely involved with public education.</p><p>Snyder believes many students might be being pushed toward getting a four-year college degree when vocation education – technical career training or community college – might make just as much sense for them.</p><p>In the state House and Senate, there is movement towards changing Michigan’s high school graduation requirements.</p> Tue, 23 Apr 2013 18:13:00 +0000 Stateside Staff 12234 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan high school curriculum could be changing - for better or worse? Survey: Michigan small businesses want changes to graduation standards http://michiganradio.org/post/survey-michigan-small-businesses-want-changes-graduation-standards <p>Small business owners want Michigan to make its curriculum standards for high school students more flexible.</p><p>The state passed broad standards in 2006 for all students. They are supposed to ensure all students are ready for college.</p><p>The Michigan Merit Curriculum requires four years of math and English language arts; three years of science and social studies; and two years of a foreign language. Complete <a href="http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/FAQ_-_Entire_Document_12.07_217841_7.pdf">standards are outlined here</a>.</p> Wed, 03 Apr 2013 21:00:55 +0000 Lindsey Smith 11997 at http://michiganradio.org Survey: Michigan small businesses want changes to graduation standards Should Michigan make learning a foreign language optional? http://michiganradio.org/post/should-michigan-make-learning-foreign-language-optional <p>A bill in the state legislature would drop the foreign language requirement in Michigan high schools.</p><p></p><p>State Representative Phil Potvin dismisses the suggestion that learning a foreign language will better prepare Michigan teens for a globalized economy. He says the requirement has the opposite effect. Potvin says the foreign language requirement pushes kids to drop out of school.</p><p></p><p>“It’s forcing kids into frustration…it’s forcing kids into failure….at a time that I thought we were here to set up success,” says Potvin.</p><p></p> Sat, 09 Feb 2013 19:05:00 +0000 Steve Carmody 11162 at http://michiganradio.org Should Michigan make learning a foreign language optional? Does everyone need a four-year college degree? http://michiganradio.org/post/does-everyone-need-four-year-college-degree <p>Yesterday, Rick Pluta reported on a speech by Gov. Rick Snyder that called for a reemphasis on vocational and community college education over more&nbsp; traditional four-degrees.</p><p>We posted his story on Facebook, and many of our fans responded with their thoughts. We decided to continue the discussion by sharing some of their comments here.</p><p>Facebook fan Karen Hupp Taylor was surprised to find herself agreeing with Gov. Snyder:</p><blockquote><p><span data-ft="{&quot;tn&quot;:&quot;K&quot;}" id=".reactRoot[5].[1][2][1]{comment409166969140690_4062599}..[1]..[1]..[0].[2]"><span class="UFICommentBody" id=".reactRoot[5].[1][2][1]{comment409166969140690_4062599}..[1]..[1]..[0].[2]."><span id=".reactRoot[5].[1][2][1]{comment409166969140690_4062599}..[1]..[1]..[0].[2]..[0]">I never thought I would see the day I would agree with Governor Snyder, but this is one place that I do. Not everyone should go to college. A lot of young people do because they have been told they will never amount to anything if they don't. Lots of them would like to be carpenters, electricians, and other trades people.</span></span></span></p><p><span data-ft="{&quot;tn&quot;:&quot;K&quot;}"><span class="UFICommentBody"><span>Nothing wrong with a women getting into many of these professions.</span></span></span></p></blockquote><p>So how many women seek this kind of education?</p><p>A <a href="http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2008/2008035.pdf">report</a> by the National Center for Education Statistics notes that participation in vocational education, also known as career and technical education (CTE), is higher for women than men. Fri, 14 Sep 2012 17:34:13 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 9095 at http://michiganradio.org Does everyone need a four-year college degree? In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . . http://michiganradio.org/post/mornings-michigan-news-headlines-71 <p><strong>Snyder promotes vocational training</strong></p><p>"Governor Rick Snyder says Michigan and the rest of the country<a href="http://michiganradio.org/post/too-much-emphasis-four-year-degree-says-michigan-governor"> lost sight of the value of vocational training</a> as young people were encouraged to get four-year college degrees. The governor spoke Thursday at a business conference in Grand Rapids.&nbsp; He says too many students have been pushed toward getting four-year college degrees when vocational education or community college might have made more sense. The governor says the result is thousands of jobs in skilled trades go unfilled while people are looking for work. Snyder says he intends to convene a summit of educators and employers early next year to get a better sense of where the demand for jobs is strongest – and use that information to help re-design Michigan’s education system. The governor has also called for stronger integration of pre-school through post-high school education," Rick Pluta reports.</p><p><strong>Report finds 17 percent of Metro Detroit youth are not working or in school</strong></p><p><a href="http://www.measureofamerica.org/one-in-seven">"A new report</a> says Metro Detroit has one of the country’s highest rates of youth who are not working or in school. The group Measure of America looked at 16- to 24-year-olds in the nation’s 25 biggest metro areas. It found Metro Detroit had the third-highest rate of so-called “disconnected” youth, at about 17-percent. Only Phoenix and Miami had higher rates. The report recommends universal preschool education, and re-building vocational education programs, as effective ways to fight the disconnection problem," <a href="http://michiganradio.org/post/study-metro-detroit-has-nations-third-highest-rate-youth-disconnection">Sarah Cwiek reports. </a></p><p><strong>Public defense overhaul stalled </strong></p><p>"The state Attorney General has stalled a plan to overhaul Michigan’s public defense system. The state is consistently ranked as one of the worst in the country for providing defense attorneys to those who can’t afford one. But Bill Schuette’s legislative relations director Alan Cropsey came to the hearing with a long list of concerns about the bill. He says it would open the state to lawsuits, and doesn’t provide enough oversight. Supporters of the bill hope to have another hearing this month," <a href="http://michiganradio.org/post/plan-overhaul-michigans-public-defense-system-hits-schuette-roadblock">Jake Neher reports. </a></p><p> Fri, 14 Sep 2012 11:41:13 +0000 Emily Fox 9085 at http://michiganradio.org In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . . Study: Metro Detroit has nation's third-highest rate of "youth disconnection" http://michiganradio.org/post/study-metro-detroit-has-nations-third-highest-rate-youth-disconnection <p>A new report says Metro Detroit has a serious problem with “disconnected” youth.</p><p>The <a href="http://www.measureofamerica.org/one-in-seven">Measure of America study</a> shows 17%, or more than 85,000, of the region’s 16-to-24-year olds aren’t working or in school.</p><p>Using that definition of “disconnection,” the study looked at census data from the nation’s 25 biggest metro areas. Metro Detroit had the third-highest rate of youth disconnection.</p> Thu, 13 Sep 2012 23:45:16 +0000 Sarah Cwiek 9083 at http://michiganradio.org Too much emphasis on a four-year degree, says Michigan Governor http://michiganradio.org/post/too-much-emphasis-four-year-degree-says-michigan-governor <p>Governor Rick Snyder said Michigan and the rest of the country lost sight of the value of vocational training as young people were encouraged to get four-year college degrees. The governor spoke today at a business conference in Grand Rapids, the West Michigan Policy Forum.</p><p>He said too many students have been pushed toward getting four-year college degrees when vocational education or community college might have made more sense.</p><p>“And so we sorta messed up over the past 20 or 30 years, 40 years. We’ve lost the focus on how important those roles are,” said Snyder.</p><p>The governor said the result is thousands of jobs in skilled trades go unfilled while people are looking for work.</p><p>“How dumb was that? I mean, if you stop and think about it. So we did supply on one chart, demand on another chart, and when everyone knows we need to have one chart where we bring supply and demand together, and create talent, and connect it,” said Snyder.</p><p>Snyder says he intends to convene a summit of educators and employers early next year to get a better sense of where the demand for jobs is strongest – and use that information to help re-design Michigan’s education system.</p><p>The governor has also called for stronger integration of pre-school through post-high school education. Thu, 13 Sep 2012 21:27:43 +0000 Rick Pluta 9081 at http://michiganradio.org Too much emphasis on a four-year degree, says Michigan Governor Changing Michigan's educational focus http://michiganradio.org/post/changing-michigans-educational-focus <p>There&rsquo;s a push to change Michigan&#39;s high school graduation standards to encourage more students to pursue vocational training. But state education officials oppose the proposed changes. Wed, 30 May 2012 18:04:36 +0000 Steve Carmody 7679 at http://michiganradio.org Changing Michigan's educational focus Student debt: When fixing cars breaks the bank http://michiganradio.org/post/student-debt-when-fixing-cars-breaks-bank <p>Americans owe close to a <a href="http://www.finaid.org/loans/studentloandebtclock.phtml">trillion dollars in student loan debt</a>.</p><p>Changing Gears has been <a href="http://www.changinggears.info/2012/02/29/student-debt-the-cost-of-learning-a-trade/">reporting on that debt</a>, a lot of which comes from attending private, for-profit schools.&nbsp; They&rsquo;re the fastest growing part of higher education, popular for non-degree technical training. Call them career colleges, technical schools or trade schools - just don&rsquo;t call them cheap.</p><ul><li>Fact: For-profit schools cost more than community colleges.</li><li>Fact: For-profit students borrow more, then <a href="http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/defaultmanagement/instrates.html">default more than students from public colleges.</a></li><li>Fact:&nbsp; All this explains why I ended up at the strip club in Detroit.</li></ul><p>So I&rsquo;m at Cobra&rsquo;s the Grind, eyes-avoiding-buttocks, walking up dimly lit stairs to meet the manager. Wed, 07 Mar 2012 15:49:17 +0000 Kate Davidson 6534 at http://michiganradio.org Student debt: When fixing cars breaks the bank