drone http://michiganradio.org en Unmanned drones on the minds of Michigan lawmakers http://michiganradio.org/post/unmanned-drones-minds-michigan-lawmakers <p>Michigan lawmakers take up drone legislation this week.</p><p>The unmanned aircraft have proven effective in war, but some are concerned they may violate the rights of Michiganders.</p><p>Unmanned drones offer a new way to see the world. The drones can help police departments keep an eye on criminals, give state agencies a different way to survey state land and even help local school administrators watch students on the playground.</p><p>But there is concern that drones could be abused.</p> Sun, 14 Apr 2013 17:17:00 +0000 Steve Carmody 12119 at http://michiganradio.org Unmanned drones on the minds of Michigan lawmakers Congressman Amash and Michigan ACLU talk wiretaps, drones, and gay marriage http://michiganradio.org/post/congressman-amash-and-michigan-aclu-talk-wiretaps-drones-and-gay-marriage <p>Congressman Justin Amash (R-Grand Rapids) says libertarian leaning Republicans like himself are having an impact on federal policies involving people’s civil rights. He made the remarks at a town hall meeting Monday night hosted by the American Civil Liberties Union in Grand Rapids.</p><p>He points to US Senator Rand Paul’s 13-hour-long filibuster of John Brennan’s nomination as director of the Central Intelligence Agency. That filibuster was, in part, to raise awareness about the ambiguity in the rules governing the use of unmanned drones on American soil.</p> Tue, 26 Mar 2013 16:23:32 +0000 Lindsey Smith 11866 at http://michiganradio.org Congressman Amash and Michigan ACLU talk wiretaps, drones, and gay marriage ACLU and Republican Congressman to talk drones in America and indefinite detention http://michiganradio.org/post/aclu-and-republican-congressman-talk-drones-america-and-indefinite-detention <p>Congressman Justin Amash (R-Grand Rapids) and the American Civil Liberties Union are teaming up to talk about national security.</p><p>Amash is more libertarian than many Republicans. While he and the ACLU don’t see eye to eye on everything, ACLU of Michigan Deputy Director Mary Bejian called Amash “one of the ACLU’s strongest allies in congress on these important national security issues.”</p> Mon, 25 Mar 2013 10:00:00 +0000 Lindsey Smith 11830 at http://michiganradio.org ACLU and Republican Congressman to talk drones in America and indefinite detention Stateside: Michigan site to research unmanned aircraft http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-michigan-site-research-unmanned-aircraft <p><em>The following is a </em><em>summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above. </em></p><p>When you hear about unmanned aircraft your first thought might be "drones."</p><p>There is plenty of debate about using unmanned aircraft for spying and lethal attacks, but there are other uses for unmanned aircraft, and that’s what we are going to take a look at right now.</p><p>The University of Michigan is teaming up with the Michigan Unmanned Aerial System Center Project in Alpena, Michigan.&nbsp;</p><p>The Michigan Economic Development recently pledged a half million dollars to the research test site and fly zone for unmanned aircraft systems.</p><p>Michigan Radio's Lester Graham spoke with Professor Ella Atkins of the University of Michigan Aerospace Engineering about the new site.</p><p> Mon, 18 Feb 2013 20:34:43 +0000 Stateside Staff 11297 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside: Michigan site to research unmanned aircraft A bird's-eye view of Detroit and the coming 'Drone Age' http://michiganradio.org/post/birds-eye-view-detroit-and-coming-drone-age <p>This drone doesn&#39;t shoot missiles, like the military&#39;s multi-million dollar flying death machines.</p><p>It just takes some amazing pictures (and can cost <a href="http://www.udrones.com/Default.asp">in the neighborhood of $500 to $1,000</a>).</p><p>The video from the four rotor hobbyist helicopter was posted by YouTube user &quot;Tretch5000.&quot;</p><p><a href="http://www.deadlinedetroit.com/articles/1197/a_lone_drone_in_detroit_airspace_sees_the_city_as_it_never_has_been_seen">Bill McGraw of Deadline Detroit</a> reposted on the video late last night. He writes:</p><blockquote><p><span class="article_body">Tretch5000&#39;s drone buzzes over the green lawns and trees of Belle Isle.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span class="article_body">It glides between floors of an abandoned factory and out over a meadow of discarded tires.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span class="article_body">It zig-zags among the pillars of an old church that looks like a Roman ruin.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span class="article_body">It soars up the back, over the top and down the front of the Michigan Central Station in a dizzying trip that gives the viewer the sensation of falling -- or flying -- off the roof.</span></p></blockquote><p>Here&#39;s the video, flying to the sounds of Ruby Frost and Mt. Eden&#39;s &quot;Oh That I Had&quot;:</p><p>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkMiIT1VG98</p><p>Remotely controlled flying machines are nothing new, but their capabilities are significantly increasing while their costs are significantly decreasing.</p><p>Wired Magazine&#39;s Editor in Chief Chris Anderson attributes the &quot;drone&quot; boom to burgeoning smart phone technology in his self-promoting piece &quot;<a href="http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/06/ff_drones">How I Accidentally Kickstarted the Domestic Drone Boom</a>.&quot; (One poster commented, &quot;Next up: How I kickstarted the Internet, by Al Gore.&quot;)</p><p>Anderson writes:</p><blockquote><p>&mdash;sensors, optics, batteries, and embedded processors&mdash;all of them growing smaller and faster each year. Just as the 1970s saw the birth and rise of the personal computer, this decade will see the ascendance of the personal drone. We&rsquo;re entering the Drone Age.</p></blockquote><p>And Anderson and his company hope to be there to capitalize on it.</p><p>Right now, these &quot;drones&quot; can&#39;t really be drone-like unless the Federal Aviation Administration steps in.</p><p><a href="http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/news/FAATweaksDroneRules_206690-1.html">FAA rules</a> require that UAS (or unmanned aircraft systems) have to be within the operator&#39;s line of sight, have to stay under 400 feet, have to be flown during the day and have to be away from airports.</p><p>To be a &quot;drone&quot; implies that it flies somewhere either far from the person controlling it, or on some type of pre-programmed auto-pilot course.</p><p>With increasing pressure mounting (the <a href="http://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/uas/media/UAS_FACT_Sheet.pdf">government says</a> in the United States alone, approximately 50 companies, universities, and government organizations are developing and producing over 155 unmanned aircraft designs), the FAA is looking into how it can regulate the coming &quot;Drone Age&quot; safely. They expect to have new rules by 2015.</p><p>Who knows? In 2015, Michigan Radio might finally be able to afford its first news chopper. Mon, 16 Jul 2012 20:23:04 +0000 Mark Brush 8294 at http://michiganradio.org A bird's-eye view of Detroit and the coming 'Drone Age'