Stateside http://michiganradio.org en Stateside for Tuesday, April 22, 2014 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-tuesday-april-22-2014 <p>Big news out of Washington, D.C. today: The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld Michigan’s ban on race- and gender-based affirmative action. The Court's majority held that Michigan voters were within their rights to amend the state constitution to ban the college admission policies. We dove into the decision on today's show.</p><p>Then, we checked in with Michigan Radio's auto-beat reporter Tracy Samilton about big changes that are likely in the leadership at Ford.</p><p>And, on this Earth Day, what moths can tell us about the world's changing climate.</p><p>Also, we spoke with author Joseph Tirella about his book Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World's Fair and the Transformation of America.</p><p>First on the show, i<span style="line-height: 1.5;">t's taken months of bargaining, bickering and posturing, but there have been promising advances in the Detroit bankruptcy journey.</span></p><p>Pieces are starting to fall into place that could complete the so-called "grand bargain" that would protect the DIA collection and soften the blow for Detroit's retirees.</p><p>First came word of a tentative deal between the city and its pensioners. A day later, the board that represents police and fire retirees gave unanimous approval to the deal.</p><p>Now it's on to the next hurdle: getting state lawmakers to approve Michigan's share of the grand bargain – $350 million.</p><p>Chris Gautz, Capitol Correspondent of Crain's Detroit Business, joined us today.</p><p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:27:44 +0000 Stateside Staff 17317 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Tuesday, April 22, 2014 What can Finnish moths tell us about climate change? http://michiganradio.org/post/what-can-finnish-moths-tell-us-about-climate-change <p></p><p>Today marks the 44th anniversary of Earth Day. Many consider April 22, 1970 to be the birth of the modern environmental movement.</p><p>At that time, Earth Day organizers had an advantage: The environmental problems were highly visible, tangible problems that people came up against in their daily lives, such as toxic effluent from factories spilled into streams and rivers. Kids couldn't swim in lakes and rivers because they were too polluted.&nbsp; Parks and highways were strewn with trash and air pollution made people sick.</p><p>You could draw a direct connection between these problems and the need for environmental action to improve the quality of life for everyone.</p><p>Many of today's biggest environmental concerns seem more abstract even though they are perhaps even more threatening than the burning river in Cleveland. Global warming is one example.</p><p>That's why a study by our next guest caught our eye. He found that what is happening to moths in Finnish Lapland suggests that we're underestimating the impacts of climate change because much of the harm is hidden from view.</p><p>Mark Hunter is a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Michigan, and he joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:17:56 +0000 Stateside Staff 17314 at http://michiganradio.org What can Finnish moths tell us about climate change? U.S. Supreme Court upholds Michigan's affirmative action ban in college admissions http://michiganradio.org/post/us-supreme-court-upholds-michigans-affirmative-action-ban-college-admissions <p></p><p>The U.S. Supreme Court upheld Michigan’s ban on race- and gender-based affirmative action in college admissions today.</p><p>A six-to-two majority on the Court held that Michigan voters were within their rights to amend the state constitution to ban the admission policies.</p><p>Rick Pluta is Lansing bureau chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, and he joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:16:43 +0000 Stateside Staff 17315 at http://michiganradio.org U.S. Supreme Court upholds Michigan's affirmative action ban in college admissions Will state lawmakers approve the Detroit bankruptcy "grand bargain?" http://michiganradio.org/post/will-state-lawmakers-approve-detroit-bankruptcy-grand-bargain <p></p><p>It's taken months of bargaining, bickering and posturing, but there have been promising advances in the Detroit bankruptcy journey.</p><p>Pieces are starting to fall into place that could complete the so-called "grand bargain" that would protect the DIA collection and soften the blow for Detroit's retirees.</p><p>First came word of a tentative deal between the city and its pensioners. A day later, the board that represents police and fire retirees gave a unanimous approval to the deal.</p><p>Now it's on to the next hurdle: getting state lawmakers to approve Michigan's share of the grand bargain –$350 million.</p><p>Chris Gautz, Capitol Correspondent of Crain's Detroit Business, joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:06:18 +0000 Stateside Staff 17312 at http://michiganradio.org Will state lawmakers approve the Detroit bankruptcy "grand bargain?" Detroit Big Three ruled the 1964 World's Fair; what's changed in the last 50 years? http://michiganradio.org/post/detroit-big-three-ruled-1964-worlds-fair-whats-changed-last-50-years <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The 1964 World's Fair opened its door to an eager public 50 years ago this day at the Flushing Meadows Corona Park, in New York City.</span></p><p>And it is no exaggeration to say that cars ruled that World's Fair. Detroit's Big Three worked very hard to grab the world's attention.</p><p>We talk about what those messages were and how the Detroit Three weren't just selling cars, they were pushing a lifestyle and a political system.</p><p>Joseph Tirella, author of <em>Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World's Fair and the Transformation of America</em>, joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:05:43 +0000 Stateside Staff 17316 at http://michiganradio.org Detroit Big Three ruled the 1964 World's Fair; what's changed in the last 50 years? Mark Fields to take the place of Alan Mulally as Ford CEO http://michiganradio.org/post/mark-fields-take-place-alan-mulally-ford-ceo <p>All signs point to a big change at Ford Motor Company.</p><p>Although the automaker has not made an official announcement, there is much speculation today that CEO Alan Mulally is reportedly ready to retire before the year is out and COO Mark Fields will ascend to the top spot.</p><p>Michigan Radio's auto reporter Tracy Samilton joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:05:31 +0000 Stateside Staff 17313 at http://michiganradio.org Mark Fields to take the place of Alan Mulally as Ford CEO The return of Artpod! http://michiganradio.org/post/return-artpod <p></p><p>It's been a long, stupidly cold and soul-killing winter.&nbsp;</p><p>Few people know that Artpod&nbsp;cannot survive until we've had at least three days above 70 degrees.</p><p>So it's only now that Artpod can emerge from hibernation,&nbsp;&nbsp;much the way men's feet are unfortunately baring themselves to the world in flip flops again. &nbsp;</p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 17:13:22 +0000 Kate Wells 17304 at http://michiganradio.org The return of Artpod! Stateside for Monday, April 21, 2014 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-monday-april-21-2014 <p></p><p>We know it's there. It seems like it’s everywhere - money in political campaigns. And now with the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision in McCutcheon vs. Federal Election Commission<em>,</em> we're going to see even more of it.</p><p>Today we look at what elections in Michigan will look like post-McCutcheon.</p><p>And we spoke with author Vic Strecher. He lost his daughter Julia to heart disease when she was 19. That loss sent him on a voyage through philosophy, biology, psychology, literature, neuroscience and Egyptology.</p><p>We delved into his new book “On Purpose” later in the show.</p><p>But first we spoke with Michigan Radio’s political analyst, Jack Lessenberry about the upcoming elections.</p><p>We are a little more than four months away from the statewide primaries, the statewide Republican and Democratic conventions, and some seven months away from the general election in November. Among many local and Congressional races, that's also when Michiganders will go to the polls to vote for Governor, Attorney General and Secretary of State.&nbsp;</p><p> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:04:49 +0000 Stateside Staff 17297 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Monday, April 21, 2014 Jack Lessenberry gives us a preview of this year's election http://michiganradio.org/post/jack-lessenberry-gives-us-preview-years-election <p></p><p>Today we spoke with Michigan Radio’s political analyst, Jack Lessenberry, about the upcoming elections.</p><p>We are a little more than four months away from the statewide primaries, the statewide Republican and Democratic conventions, and some seven months away from the general election in November. Among many local and Congressional races, that's also when Michiganders will go to the polls to vote for Governor, Attorney General and Secretary of State.&nbsp;</p><p> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:04:00 +0000 Stateside Staff 17298 at http://michiganradio.org Jack Lessenberry gives us a preview of this year's election Michigan builder provides tips on keeping your basement dry http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-builder-provides-tips-keeping-your-basement-dry <p></p><p>Now that spring is here, and the warmer temps are chasing away the last traces of the heavy snowfall, homeowners around the state are keeping wary eyes on their basements, worried about flooding.</p><p>Ronald Gay knows a thing or two about flooding and Michigan basements.</p><p>He's a builder, a former home inspector in Oakland County, and his new book is "5 Steps to a Dry Basement or Crawl Space.”</p><p><em>*Listen to our interview with him above.</em></p><p> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:03:52 +0000 Stateside Staff 17299 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan builder provides tips on keeping your basement dry How will Michigan's elections be influenced by the latest U.S. Supreme Court decision? http://michiganradio.org/post/how-will-michigans-elections-be-influenced-latest-us-supreme-court-decision <div>When the U.S. Supreme Court recently handed down its 5-4 decision in McCutcheon vs. Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:03:01 +0000 Stateside Staff 17302 at http://michiganradio.org How will Michigan's elections be influenced by the latest U.S. Supreme Court decision? This father shares the lessons he learned after losing a child http://michiganradio.org/post/father-shares-lessons-he-learned-after-losing-child <p>Losing a child is one of the greatest blows anyone will bear.</p><p>It would be so understandable if that parent crumbles into his or her grief – becomes filled with sorrow and anger.</p><p>But when Vic Strecher lost his 19-year-old daughter, Julia, to heart disease, that experience of being "broken open" sent him on a voyage through philosophy, biology, psychology, literature, neuroscience, Egyptology, and more.</p><p>Strecher has turned that journey of self-discovery and growth into a remarkable graphic story.</p><p>It's called “On Purpose: Lessons in Life and Health from The Frog, the Dung Beetle, and Julia.”</p><p><em>*Listen to our interview with him above.</em></p><p> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:02:49 +0000 Stateside Staff 17301 at http://michiganradio.org This father shares the lessons he learned after losing a child Yankee Air Museum sets record for most "Rosies;" now about that bomber plant http://michiganradio.org/post/yankee-air-museum-sets-record-most-rosies-now-about-bomber-plant <p></p><p>A few weeks ago, 778 women of all ages donned coveralls, tied their hair up with bandanas, and headed to the Yankee Air Museum at Willow Run Airport in southeast Michigan to try to break a world record.</p><p>And now it's official. That gathering has set the Guinness World Record: 778 “Rosie the Riveters” all in one place.</p><p>It was the Yankee Air Museum's second try at setting the Guinness World Record for the most women and girls dressed as Rosies, and their second try was a charm.</p><p>The original&nbsp;Rosies&nbsp;turned out B-24 "Liberator" heavy bombers at the plant during World War II.</p><p>The event helps the museum with the serious business of raising enough money to save the historic Willow Run Bomber plant from demolition.</p><p>The Yankee Air Museum is trying to raise $8 million to buy the old plant from the RACER trust, which oversees liquidation of former GM properties.</p><p>The Museum has until May 1 to save the bomber plant from the wrecker's ball.</p><p><em>*Listen to our interview above.</em></p><p> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 21:02:43 +0000 Stateside Staff 17303 at http://michiganradio.org Yankee Air Museum sets record for most "Rosies;" now about that bomber plant Stateside for Wednesday, April 16, 2014 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-wednesday-april-16-2014 <p>Today on Stateside, we talk about the growing resale economy, we hear another story of failure from Failure:Lab, we get the latest from the GM ignition switch controversy, and we learn about a new theory that could help our understanding of black holes.</p> Wed, 16 Apr 2014 20:36:47 +0000 Stateside Staff 17259 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Wednesday, April 16, 2014 An MSU physicist believes he has solved the "black hole information paradox" http://michiganradio.org/post/msu-physicist-believes-he-has-solved-black-hole-information-paradox <p>Ever since Stephen Hawking came out with his theory about how black holes work, physicists – including Hawking himself – have been wrestling with a "hole" in that theory.</p><p>Hawking postulated that if you threw something like a chair into a black hole, given enough time that chair would "dematerialize." It would disappear, leaving no trace of its existence.</p><p>But the laws of physics don't allow for things to simply disappear. Things can change, or be altered, but they can't disappear. You can burn a piece of paper, and it's no longer there, but the carbon, water, and other molecules still exist somewhere. Again, it can't simply&nbsp;disappear.</p><p>It's called the black hole information paradox.</p><p>PBS' Kate Becker quoted Stanford physicist Leonard Susskind in describing Hawking's theory in her post "<a href="http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/blogs/physics/2013/12/do-black-holes-destroy-information/">Do Black Holes Destroy Information?</a>":</p><blockquote><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">As Leonard </span>Susskind<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> wrote in “The Black Hole War,” his 2008 book on the problem of black holes and information loss, “The possibility of hiding information in a vault would hardly be a cause for alarm, but what if when the door was shut, the vault evaporated right in front of your eyes? That’s exactly what Hawking predicted would happen to the black hole.”</span></p></blockquote><p><strong><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The solution?</span></strong></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Now comes a theoretical physicist and computational biologist from Michigan State University who believes he has solved Hawking's black hole information paradox.</span></p><p>Chris&nbsp;Adami&nbsp;joined us today on Stateside.&nbsp;<em style="line-height: 1.5;">(You can listen to how he explains his theory above.)</em></p><p>Hawking discovered that black holes emit a glow called the “Hawking radiation.” That radiation, Hawking theorized, consumes the black hole and all things in the hole are lost. Poof! Nothing left.</p><p>Adami theorizes that a copy of the chair is made before it goes into the black hole.</p><p>More on Adami’s solution from <a href="http://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2014/plugging-the-hole-in-hawkings-black-hole-theory-1/">MSU</a>:</p><p> Wed, 16 Apr 2014 20:25:18 +0000 Mark Brush & Stateside Staff 17260 at http://michiganradio.org An MSU physicist believes he has solved the "black hole information paradox" GM asks bankruptcy judge to look at its liability http://michiganradio.org/post/gm-asks-bankruptcy-judge-look-its-liability <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">General Motors is asking a bankruptcy judge in New York to take a look at its "shield" – the shield that protects it from liability lawsuits that stem from crashes or defects that happened before its bankruptcy.</span></p><div><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Veteran auto analyst Michelle Krebs joined us today.</span></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>She explained what GM is trying to find out.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>*Listen to the audio above.</em></div> Wed, 16 Apr 2014 20:14:52 +0000 Stateside Staff 17258 at http://michiganradio.org GM asks bankruptcy judge to look at its liability Michigan native fails to make it in NYC http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-native-fails-make-it-nyc <p style="padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 22px; font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15.19px; margin-bottom: 15px; vertical-align: baseline;">It was Bill Gates who declared,"It's fine to celebrate success, but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure."</p><p style="padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 22px; font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15.19px; margin-bottom: 15px; vertical-align: baseline;">And it's good to realize that we all fail at times. It's just that most of us try to cover that up, or, at the very least, we don't broadcast our failures.</p><p style="padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 22px; font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15.19px; margin-bottom: 15px; vertical-align: baseline;">But that’s not how it works at&nbsp;<a href="http://failure-lab.com/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(12, 76, 162); vertical-align: baseline;" target="_blank">Failure:Lab</a>.</p><p style="padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 22px; font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15.19px; margin-bottom: 15px; vertical-align: baseline;">It’s a program designed to get us thinking about the meaning of failure – to realize that failure happens to everyone and to inspire us to take intelligent risks.</p><p style="padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 22px; font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15.19px; margin-bottom: 15px; vertical-align: baseline;">You can see our past Failure:Lab posts&nbsp;<a href="http://michiganradio.org/term/failurelab" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(12, 76, 162); vertical-align: baseline;">here</a>.</p><p style="padding: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 22px; font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15.19px; margin-bottom: 15px; vertical-align: baseline;">Today, we hear about Rick Beerhorst’s failure: his attempt to move his family to New York City. Wed, 16 Apr 2014 18:30:54 +0000 Mark Brush 17257 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan native fails to make it in NYC How effective are online classes for K-12 students in Michigan? http://michiganradio.org/post/how-effective-are-online-classes-k-12-students-michigan <p></p> <p> Online learning. Make no mistake about it: It is here and it is growing.</p><p>The number of students taking online courses has grown 52% in the past three years. In the 2012-2013 school year, some 55,000 students in Michigan took a virtual course.</p><p>A new report from the Michigan Virtual University looks at virtual learning for K-12 students –who’s taking online classes, what kinds of classes and how effective the classes are.</p><p>The results are mixed.</p><p>Jamey Fitzpatrick is president and CEO of Michigan Virtual University, and he joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 15 Apr 2014 20:58:37 +0000 Stateside Staff 17237 at http://michiganradio.org How effective are online classes for K-12 students in Michigan? New Ken Burns film documents students learning the Gettysberg Address http://michiganradio.org/post/new-ken-burns-film-documents-students-learning-gettysberg-address <p></p><p>Ever since a student at Ann Arbor's Pioneer High School got his first 8mm camera for his 17th birthday, he has searched for good stories to tell.</p><p>And tell them he does. That Ann Arbor high school kid was Ken Burns. And since getting that first camera in 1970, Ken has turned his camera and his storyteller's eye to subjects like World War II, the Civil War, the Brooklyn Bridge, baseball, jazz, the West, the Brooklyn Five, and so much more.</p><p>Tonight on PBS, Ken Burns brings us his newest story. It's called "The Address."</p><p>The film follows the students at a tiny school in Vermont where students are challenged each year to learn and recite Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.</p><p>As he follows these boys, Ken uncovers many powerful individual stories and, at the same time, brings us a much-needed reminder of the power of Abraham Lincoln's words.</p><p>Ken Burns joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 15 Apr 2014 20:57:03 +0000 Stateside Staff 17233 at http://michiganradio.org New Ken Burns film documents students learning the Gettysberg Address Visiting loved ones at Beth Olem cemetery is complicated http://michiganradio.org/post/visiting-loved-ones-beth-olem-cemetery-complicated <p>As we get together with our families to celebrate the holidays, we often think about those who are no longer with us. For many, a trip to a cemetery to visit loved ones is easy, but for others, it’s impossible.</p><p>For families with relatives buried in the Beth Olem cemetery in Detroit, they can’t go pay their respects.</p><p>The cemetery is hidden within GM’s Poletown plant, and is only open to the public two days every year: the Sunday before Passover and Rosh Hashanah.</p><p>People are able to visit the cemetery if they go on a private tour offered by the Michigan Jewish Historical Society. We heard from some of the visitors today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 15 Apr 2014 20:54:46 +0000 Stateside Staff 17236 at http://michiganradio.org Visiting loved ones at Beth Olem cemetery is complicated