Stan Ovshinsky http://michiganradio.org en Commentary: Farewell to Stan Ovshinsky http://michiganradio.org/post/commentary-farewell-stan-ovshinsky <p>Somewhere in most Michigan newspapers today, past the stories about the Tigers winning the pennant and the campaign ads, you may find an obituary for a gentle man who changed the world.</p><p>Stan Ovshinsky died at his Bloomfield Hills home Wednesday night, a few weeks short of his 90th birthday. You may never have heard of him, but he almost certainly touched your life.</p> Fri, 19 Oct 2012 15:37:28 +0000 Jack Lessenberry 9535 at http://michiganradio.org Commentary: Farewell to Stan Ovshinsky Scientist, inventor Stanford R. Ovshinsky dies at 89 http://michiganradio.org/post/scientist-inventor-stanford-r-ovshinsky-dies-89 <p><em>An obituary from the Ovshinsky family:</em></p><p>Stanford R. Ovshinsky died peacefully at his home just 39 days short of his 90<sup>th</sup> birthday.&nbsp; The cause of death was prostate cancer.&nbsp;</p> Thu, 18 Oct 2012 16:03:30 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 9518 at http://michiganradio.org Scientist, inventor Stanford R. Ovshinsky dies at 89 Commentary: Science and politics http://michiganradio.org/post/commentary-science-and-politics <p>Everybody knows the old saying that prophets are never&nbsp; appreciated in their own countries. We take the familiar for granted.</p><p>That’s certainly the case in Michigan. This is one of the more beautiful states in the union, something we sometimes forget. We also have some of the nation’s most fascinating people, some of whom aren’t always on the media radar screen.</p> Tue, 04 Sep 2012 13:07:36 +0000 Jack Lessenberry 8924 at http://michiganradio.org Commentary: Science and politics Building the Future http://michiganradio.org/post/building-future <p>I had dinner the other night with perhaps the most amazing man in Michigan, a man who has been hard at work creating the future for more than half a century .</p><p>I&rsquo;m talking about the inventor Stanford Ovshinsky, a man whose life story is better than any novel, and who has more than four hundred patents to his name. If you have a laptop computer, you have him to thank for the nickel-metal-hydride battery that powers it.</p><p>His inventions include the processes that makes solar cells practical, and the first rewrittable CDs and DVDs. Five years ago, he left the company he had founded to do all these things -- Energy Conversion Devices -- and promptly started a new firm. Ovshinsky Innovation, LLC.&nbsp; After all, he was then barely in his mid-80s.</p><p>Today, he and his wife Rosa, a Chinese-born physicist, are hard at work on photovoltaics, which means harnessing a form of solar energy for practical purposes.&nbsp; Ovshinsky is convinced that he can bring down the cost of solar energy considerably below coal, and and that hydrogen is the automotive fuel of the future.</p><p>By the way, he has a long and distinguished track record of making predictions that those in the know laughed at -- and then proving them wrong. There are those in many countries who think he may be the greatest living scientist. What makes that especially amazing is that he never even graduated from high school.</p><p>He does, however, have at least seven honorary doctorates from distinguished schools including the University of Michigan.</p><p>Ovshinsky still works more than full-time; after all, he doesn&rsquo;t turn 89 till November. He usually wears a three-piece suit, and is the most sartorially distinguished inventor I have ever met. Fri, 22 Jul 2011 14:00:23 +0000 Jack Lessenberry 3432 at http://michiganradio.org Building the Future