proposal 3 http://michiganradio.org en Stateside: Financial transparency in politics http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-financial-transparency-politics <p>Millions of dollars were invested in Michigan’s recent ballot proposals.</p><p>While citizens were aware that money was being spent, it was often unclear how much money was spent and from whom it was coming.</p><p>Michigan Radio’s Lester Graham and Rich Robinson, director of the <a href="http://www.mcfn.org/">Michigan Campaign Finance Network</a>, spoke with Cyndy about the need for financial transparency in elections.</p> Wed, 07 Nov 2012 21:46:31 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 9819 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside: Financial transparency in politics Stateside: The renewable energy question http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-renewable-energy-question <p>Continuing our examination of the six proposals on Michigan's ballot, we turn to <a href="http://www.michiganradio.org/post/5-things-know-about-proposal-3-25-25">Proposal 3: The renewable energy question.</a><br><br>&nbsp;Michigan Radio's Rebecca Williams, host of "The Environment Report," spoke with Cyndy about how the proposal would affect the state if passed.</p><p>Listen to the segment above.</p> Wed, 31 Oct 2012 20:48:59 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 9717 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside: The renewable energy question Bill Clinton backs Michigan's Proposal 3 http://michiganradio.org/post/bill-clinton-backs-michigans-proposal-3 <p>Former President Bill Clinton has endorsed Michigan's Proposal 3, the amendment that would require 25 percent of the state’s electricity to come from wind, solar, biomass or hydropower by 2025.</p><p>The proposed amendment has drawn national attention as it would be the first to mandate a renewable portfolio standard in a state constitution.</p> Mon, 29 Oct 2012 19:01:09 +0000 Michigan Radio Newsroom 9678 at http://michiganradio.org Bill Clinton backs Michigan's Proposal 3 Commentary: The renewable energy amendment http://michiganradio.org/post/commentary-renewable-energy-amendment <p></p><p></p><p>I suspect some people are having a harder time deciding how to vote on the renewable energy amendment -- Proposal 3 -- than on any of the other five proposals on this year’s ballot.</p><p>The others are pretty straightforward. Either you think the emergency manager law is necessary, or you don’t.&nbsp; Either you think collective bargaining should be a constitutional right, or you don’t.</p> Thu, 25 Oct 2012 13:14:24 +0000 Jack Lessenberry 9616 at http://michiganradio.org Commentary: The renewable energy amendment In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . . http://michiganradio.org/post/mornings-michigan-news-headlines-96 <p><strong>Snyder holds town hall meeting on Prop 6 today</strong></p><p>"Governor Snyder will hold a town hall meeting with members of the Canada-United States Business Association in Detroit today. He’ll be stressing the need for a new Detroit-Windsor bridge—and for voters to reject Proposal 6. Proposal 6 would require voter approval for any new international bridges or tunnels for motor vehicles,” Sarah Cwiek reports.</p><p><strong>Voters in West Michigan can learn more about Prop 3 this week</strong></p><p>"People living in West Michigan will have two opportunities early this week to learn about and discuss the so-called 25 by 25 ballot proposal. If voters pass Proposal 3, utility companies in Michigan would have to get 25-percent of their energy from renewable sources like wind and solar. There’s a panel discussion tonight with people for and against Proposal 3. It’s at the Michigan Alternative and Renewable Energy Center in Muskegon. Tomorrow morning in Grand Rapids the President of the Union of Concerned Scientists will travel from Massachusetts to join west Michigan business leaders in favor of Proposal 3," Lindsey Smith reports.</p><p><strong>Some Michigan lawmakers looking to increase retirement age for public school employees</strong></p><p>"Michigan lawmakers are looking at a plan that would increase the minimum retirement age for public school employees. The current retirement age is 60. But some people want to index the retirement age according to life expectancy, which would be determined every year. Mark Guastella is with the Michigan Association of Retired School Personnel. He says the system paid more than $700 million in benefits last year to people who outlived their life expectancy," Rina Miller reports.</p><p> Mon, 22 Oct 2012 10:58:01 +0000 Emily Fox 9552 at http://michiganradio.org In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . . Proposal 3: 25 x '25 would amend Michigan's Constitution to increase use of renewables http://michiganradio.org/post/proposal-3-25-x-25-would-amend-michigans-constitution-increase-use-renewables <p><em>This is a story I produced for NPR's Morning Edition.&nbsp; Editors were interested in Proposal 3 in Michigan because, if it passes, it would be the first time a state constitution would be amended for a Renewable Portfolio Standard. We'll be looking at this proposal in more detail in future reports.</em></p><p>There are business effects to some of the more than 170 statewide ballot measures to be decided in next month's elections. In California, voters will determine if labels should be required on genetically-modified food. People in Arkansas will vote whether to increase taxes for highways and bridges. And one measure in Michigan is capturing attention - whether the state constitution should be amended to change how utilities get their electricity.</p><p> Fri, 12 Oct 2012 17:09:28 +0000 Rebecca Williams 9469 at http://michiganradio.org Proposal 3: 25 x '25 would amend Michigan's Constitution to increase use of renewables Truth Squad on Prop 3 ads: Technical Fouls for '25 by '25' http://michiganradio.org/post/truth-squad-prop-3-ads-technical-fouls-25-25 <p>Five proposed amendments to the state Constitution and one other referendum will appear on the ballot on election day. Political commercials are on your TV making arguments for and against many of the proposals.&nbsp; Michigan Watch teamed up with the Center for Michigan’s Truth Squad to look at the ads for and against Proposal 3.</p> Thu, 04 Oct 2012 11:00:00 +0000 Lester Graham 9348 at http://michiganradio.org Truth Squad on Prop 3 ads: Technical Fouls for '25 by '25' New report: "25 x '25" ballot proposal would have negligible effects on utility rates http://michiganradio.org/post/new-report-25-x-25-ballot-proposal-would-have-negligible-effects-utility-rates <p>A ballot proposal to increase Michigan’s renewable energy usage wouldn't have a big impact on utility rates, <a href="http://www.environmentalcouncil.org/newsroom/pressRelease.php?x=96">according to a new report </a>commissioned by supporters of Proposal 3.</p><p>That "25 x '25" measure would require amend the state constitution to require Michigan to generate 25% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2025.</p><p>The Michigan Environmental Council sponsored the report, performed by independent analysts Martin Cohen and George Sansoucy.</p> Wed, 03 Oct 2012 03:26:30 +0000 Sarah Cwiek 9336 at http://michiganradio.org New report: "25 x '25" ballot proposal would have negligible effects on utility rates In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . . http://michiganradio.org/post/mornings-michigan-news-headlines-69 <p><strong>Sikkema says renewable energy mandate would drive up energy costs</strong></p><p>"The campaigns for and against Proposal 3 on the November ballot are debating the cost of renewable fuels versus coal and gas. Proposal 3 would require 25 percent of the state’s electricity be generated using wind, the sun, or bio-fuels by 2025. Ken Sikkema compared the costs of renewable generation to the costs of using coal or natural gas. He found renewable energy will be more expensive. The campaign FOR Proposal 3 says the ballot question would help stabilize energy costs, because the cost of wind and solar energy is not as volatile as fossil fuels," Rick Pluta reports.</p><p><strong>Lawmakers to look at legal aid for poor defendants </strong></p><p>A hearing will take place this week to set standards for public defenders in Michigan who work with low-income people. "Michigan's public defender system is consistently rated one of the worst in the country. Michigan has no statewide training requirements for public defenders, and many public defenders say they have to take on too many cases to make a living. But they could be created soon. Lawmakers will take the first step this week. They'll hold a hearing Thursday on a bill that would create a new commission to set those standards," Sarah Hulett reports.</p><p><strong>Enbridge has paid a $3.7 million fine</strong></p><blockquote><p>"Federal regulators say the Canadian owner of a pipeline that ruptured in 2010 and dumped more than 800,000 gallons of oil into a southwestern Michigan river has paid a $3.7 million fine. Enbridge Inc. owns a pipeline running from Griffith, Ind., to Sarnia, Ontario. The pipeline burst near Marshall, Mich., spewing oil into the Kalamazoo River system. The federal agency says the penalty against Enbridge is the largest it has imposed. It cited Enbridge for 24 violations of hazardous liquid pipeline regulations, including failure to fix corrosion discovered as far back as 2004. It also says Enbridge failed to detect the rupture for 17 hours," the AP reports</p><p></p><p> Tue, 11 Sep 2012 11:31:16 +0000 Emily Fox 9021 at http://michiganradio.org In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .