books http://michiganradio.org en "He Plays A Harp" A West Michigan Mom's story of her son with CP http://michiganradio.org/post/he-plays-harp-west-michigan-moms-story-her-son-cp <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">His name was Noah. He was born with cerebral palsy. When he was 17, he lost his battle against infections that had ravaged his lungs.</span></p><p>Noah's mother, Roberta King, is from West Michigan. She has shared the story of her son's life in her new memoir <em>He Plays A Harp</em><em>.</em></p><p>“It’s a joy to me to bring him to people that never knew him. And I think through that I feel a little less of the loss,” King said.</p><p>The story starts with the Noah’s conscious decision to die and then walks through his parent’s journey in dealing with the loss.</p><p>“A lot of parents experience the birth of their children. And, gratefully, not a lot experience their death,” King said. “I wanted people to know what that was like to walk your child from one place to another.”</p><p><em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 15px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; line-height: 22px;">*Listen to full show above.&nbsp;</em></p><p> Tue, 08 Jul 2014 18:30:00 +0000 Stateside Staff 18294 at http://michiganradio.org "He Plays A Harp" A West Michigan Mom's story of her son with CP New book celebrates diversity, food and culture http://michiganradio.org/post/new-book-celebrates-diversity-food-and-culture <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>Most kids in the state are on summer break. And, while the year wrapped up with final tests, and end of year activities, one group of students celebrated the end of their school by becoming published authors.</p><p><a href="http://www.826michigan.org/">826 Michigan</a> is a nonprofit organization that supports students in developing their writing skills and helps teachers inspire students to write. This year the students worked with English Language Learner students and teachers at Ypsilanti Community High School.</p><p>This book is called <em>Enjoy! – Recipes for Building Community. </em>It includes essays, letters and recipes from the students and from chefs and other members of the local food community.</p><p>Joining us today were Liz Sirman, an ELL teacher at Ypsilanti Community High School, Lucy Centeno, one of the student writers from Ypsilanti Community High School, Ari Weinzweig, co-owner and founding partner of Zingerman’s.</p><p> Fri, 20 Jun 2014 19:41:07 +0000 Jennifer White 18093 at http://michiganradio.org New book celebrates diversity, food and culture Stateside for Tuesday, April 22, 2014 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-tuesday-april-22-2014 <p>Big news out of Washington, D.C. today: The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld Michigan’s ban on race- and gender-based affirmative action. The Court's majority held that Michigan voters were within their rights to amend the state constitution to ban the college admission policies. We dove into the decision on today's show.</p><p>Then, we checked in with Michigan Radio's auto-beat reporter Tracy Samilton about big changes that are likely in the leadership at Ford.</p><p>And, on this Earth Day, what moths can tell us about the world's changing climate.</p><p>Also, we spoke with author Joseph Tirella about his book Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World's Fair and the Transformation of America.</p><p>First on the show, i<span style="line-height: 1.5;">t's taken months of bargaining, bickering and posturing, but there have been promising advances in the Detroit bankruptcy journey.</span></p><p>Pieces are starting to fall into place that could complete the so-called "grand bargain" that would protect the DIA collection and soften the blow for Detroit's retirees.</p><p>First came word of a tentative deal between the city and its pensioners. A day later, the board that represents police and fire retirees gave unanimous approval to the deal.</p><p>Now it's on to the next hurdle: getting state lawmakers to approve Michigan's share of the grand bargain – $350 million.</p><p>Chris Gautz, Capitol Correspondent of Crain's Detroit Business, joined us today.</p><p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:27:44 +0000 Stateside Staff 17317 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Tuesday, April 22, 2014 Detroit Big Three ruled the 1964 World's Fair; what's changed in the last 50 years? http://michiganradio.org/post/detroit-big-three-ruled-1964-worlds-fair-whats-changed-last-50-years <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The 1964 World's Fair opened its door to an eager public 50 years ago this day at the Flushing Meadows Corona Park, in New York City.</span></p><p>And it is no exaggeration to say that cars ruled that World's Fair. Detroit's Big Three worked very hard to grab the world's attention.</p><p>We talk about what those messages were and how the Detroit Three weren't just selling cars, they were pushing a lifestyle and a political system.</p><p>Joseph Tirella, author of <em>Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World's Fair and the Transformation of America</em>, joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:05:43 +0000 Stateside Staff 17316 at http://michiganradio.org Detroit Big Three ruled the 1964 World's Fair; what's changed in the last 50 years? New book uncovers racism in the auto industry during WWII http://michiganradio.org/post/new-book-uncovers-racism-auto-industry-during-wwii <p>There is no question that Detroit and the automobile industry played a major role in the Allied victory over Germany and Japan in World War II. We’ve often heard southeast Michigan described as the “Arsenal of Democracy.”</p><p>But not so well known is the struggle it took to turn the auto industry toward war production, particularly as women and African-American workers stepped up to take their places on the assembly lines.</p><p>Charles Hyde, professor emeritus of history at Wayne State University, joined us today. His new book is <em>Arsenal of Democracy: The American Automobile Industry in World War II.</em></p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Thu, 03 Apr 2014 20:43:51 +0000 Stateside Staff 17091 at http://michiganradio.org New book uncovers racism in the auto industry during WWII Stateside for Thursday, March 27, 2014 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-thursday-march-27-2014 <div><p>When you think "Michigan," you think tourism, right? Or, for some, maybe it's Tim Allen telling you about the state's open roads, fall colors, glistening lakes. Tourism means big business for the mitten. We look at how the changing climate might impact what more than 4.4 million out-of-state visitors will be able to do and enjoy when they come to the Great Lakes State.&nbsp;</p></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Then, we spoke with Michigan author&nbsp;Laura Kasischke&nbsp;about her latest novel, Mind of Winter.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>And Daniel Howes&nbsp;joined us for our weekly check-in, to discuss Mary Barra and the ghost of GM's past.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Also, women are underrepresented in the&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">&nbsp;STEM&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">(science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields, but there is one University of Michigan student group trying to change that.</span></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>And, we are one week into spring but still getting snow. Meterologist&nbsp;Jim Maczko&nbsp;spoke with us about when we can expect warmer weather.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>First on the show, w<span style="line-height: 1.5;">e are closing in on the deadline to purchase health insurance or face a penalty under the Affordable Care Act.</span></div><div>&nbsp;</div><p>Erin Knott is the Michigan Director of Enroll America, a non-profit, non-partisan group trying to get people enrolled in health insurance.</p><p>Erin joined us today to discuss the upcoming deadline.&nbsp;</p><p> Thu, 27 Mar 2014 20:38:20 +0000 Stateside Staff 17007 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Thursday, March 27, 2014 Michigan author Laura Kasischke discusses her latest novel http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-author-laura-kasischke-discusses-her-latest-novel <p>You wake up on Christmas morning a bit hung over from too much spiked eggnog the night before. You woke up much later than you'd meant to and you try to shake off a lingering nightmare. You've got a houseful of guests to cook for, a moody teenage daughter sulking in her bedroom and there is a snowstorm to end all snowstorms howling outside.</p><p>Welcome to the world of Holly Judge. She's a wife, a mother, and a frustrated poet. And she's one of the central characters in the latest novel from Michigan author Laura Kasischke.&nbsp; It's a psychological thriller called Mind of Winter.</p><p>Laura Kasischke joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Thu, 27 Mar 2014 20:31:28 +0000 Stateside Staff 17001 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan author Laura Kasischke discusses her latest novel How a resistance fighter in Czechoslovakia became one of Michigan's most prominent engineers http://michiganradio.org/post/how-resistance-fighter-czechoslovakia-became-one-michigans-most-prominent-engineers <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The next time you're in downtown Detroit, and you walk by the </span>Cobo<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Center or the People Mover, or in </span>Ypsilanti<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> and you see </span>Washtenaw<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Community College, or Providence Hospital in Southfield or many other buildings around Southeast Michigan — stop for a moment and remember this name: Charles </span>Novacek<span style="line-height: 1.5;">.</span></p><p>He was born in what was then Czechoslovakia, and grew up through his country's occupation by the Nazis and then the Communists. He began training as a resistance fighter as a boy of 11, and continued the fight as he grew up. He endured prison and torture before escaping to a refugee camp and, ultimately, to a new life in Michigan.</p><p>Charles Novacek became a noted engineer in Michigan, working on many projects in the state that still stand today. And before he died in 2007, he wrote a memoir entitled "Border Crossings: Coming of Age in the Czech Resistance".</p><p>The book has now been published by Charles Novacek's wife, Sandra. We talk with Sandra about her husband's journey.&nbsp;</p><p><em>For more information on the book, visit&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;"><a href="http://www.charlesnovacekbooks.com/">www.charlesnovacekbooks.com</a>.</span></em></p><p><em><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Listen to the full interview above.</span></em></p><div> Wed, 26 Mar 2014 18:32:35 +0000 Stateside Staff 16983 at http://michiganradio.org How a resistance fighter in Czechoslovakia became one of Michigan's most prominent engineers Michigan writer releases new memoir about her time in Sweden http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-writer-releases-new-memoir-about-her-time-sweden <p><em>(Editor's note: This story was first aired on October 2nd, 2013)</em></p><p>Who among us has not had the experience of plunging into something that sure sounded good on paper, but then the reality turns out to be anything but?</p><p>So, when life hands you that proverbial lemon, you could make ‘lemonade.’ Or you could write a book.</p><p>That’s what Natalie Burg did.</p><p>Michigan writer Natalie Burg had a spectacularly bizarre experience living on a farm in Sweden, working as an au pair for a spectacularly bizarre family. She has turned all of that into a new book called “Swedish Lessons: A Memoir of sects, love and indentured servitude. Sort of.”</p><p>She joined us today in the studio.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 24 Dec 2013 21:46:00 +0000 Stateside Staff 14691 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan writer releases new memoir about her time in Sweden Author Blaine Pardoe delves into a 1963 Battle Creek murder http://michiganradio.org/post/author-blaine-pardoe-delves-1963-battle-creek-murder <p><em>(Editor's note: This story was first broadcast on September 3rd, 2013)&nbsp;</em></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">The mystery of who killed Daisy </span>Zick<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> has been on the minds of police and residents of Battle Creek since January, 1963. &nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Though at least three people caught a glimpse of her killer, no one has ever been brought to justice for the crime. &nbsp;</span></p><p>Writer Blaine Pardoe's latest book is called <em>Murder in Battle Creek: The Mysterious Death of Daisy Zick.</em>&nbsp; He joined Cynthia Canty in the studio to talk about Daisy Zick, her unsolved murder, and the possibility that&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">the killer may still be alive. &nbsp;</span></p><p><em>Listen to the story above.</em></p><p> Mon, 23 Dec 2013 20:04:00 +0000 Stateside Staff 14247 at http://michiganradio.org Author Blaine Pardoe delves into a 1963 Battle Creek murder Listen for a list of good winter reads by Keith Taylor http://michiganradio.org/post/listen-list-good-winter-reads-keith-taylor <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">This is the week we say farewell to autumn and officially welcome winter. (Unofficially, we can all agree, winter has arrived early and seems to have settled right in for the duration.)</span></p><p>And one of the great pleasures of changing seasons here on Stateside is the chance to welcome back poet and writer Keith Taylor. Taylor coordinates the undergraduate creative writing program at the University of Michigan. But we like to think of him as our Friendly Stateside Reading Guide.</p><p><em>Listen to Keith’s book pics above.</em></p><p> Fri, 20 Dec 2013 14:54:51 +0000 Stateside Staff 15776 at http://michiganradio.org Listen for a list of good winter reads by Keith Taylor Remembering one of the biggest tragedies in Michigan 100 years later http://michiganradio.org/post/remembering-one-biggest-tragedies-michigan-100-years-later <p>This month marks the 100 year anniversary of one of the saddest chapters in Michigan history. It’s called The Italian Hall Disaster, a terrible tragedy that happened on Christmas Eve, 1913, in the Upper Peninsula town of Calumet. Someone yelled "Fire!" in a packed hall and the resulting stampede killed 73--60 of them children.</p><p>It happened during the Copper Country Strike, one of the most painful chapters in Michigan's labor history.</p><p>The Copper Country Strike of 1913 and the Italian Hall Disaster is the subject of new documentary called “Red Metal,” soon to air on PBS. It is drawn from a book about the disaster called Death’s Door, written by Steve Lehto. He’s a historian with ties to the Copper Country that go back to that bitter time.</p><p>Steve Lehto joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Mon, 16 Dec 2013 22:09:10 +0000 Stateside Staff 15707 at http://michiganradio.org Remembering one of the biggest tragedies in Michigan 100 years later Independent bookstores are enjoying a renaissance http://michiganradio.org/post/independent-bookstores-are-enjoying-renaissance <p>Remember "You've Got Mail," The Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan romantic comedy?</p><p>Writer-director Norah Ephron says she wanted to make a point about little independent bookstores like Meg Ryan's "Shop Around the Corner" being crushed by the big-chain bookstores, Tom Hanks' "Fox Books."</p><p>That was 1998, and many small independent bookstores were indeed fighting for their lives in the face of the big-chain stores.</p><p>Now, in 2013, the book-selling landscape has changed. Borders books collapsed in 2011 and Barnes &amp; Noble closed many of its stores.</p><p>There is Amazon with its talk of using drones to drop your order at your door in a few years. But guess what? Independent bookstores are enjoying something of a renaissance.</p><p>Deborah Leonard, director of the Great Lakes Independent Booksellers Association, and Peter Makin, owners of Brilliant Books in Traverse City, joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Tue, 10 Dec 2013 18:30:51 +0000 Stateside Staff 15610 at http://michiganradio.org Independent bookstores are enjoying a renaissance What would happen if the US and Canada merged together into one big country? http://michiganradio.org/post/what-would-happen-if-us-and-canada-merged-together-one-big-country <p>If you live in Michigan, particularly the Eastern Upper Peninsula and the Southeast Lower Peninsula, chances are high that you’ve crossed the border into Canada. We certainly know that our Canadian neighbors are heading over here in hefty numbers. A check of license plates at Metro Detroit shopping centers makes a strong case.</p><p>Our next guest makes a case for taking these two large countries and merging them into one. She believes the two would become much stronger for joining together.</p><p>She is currently Editor at Large at the National Post, a blogger for the Huffington Post, and a Distinguished Professor at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management in Toronto. Her nine earlier books focused on politics, immigration, economics and finance and white collar crime.</p><p>Her newest book is “Merger of the Century: Why Canada and America Should Become One Country.”</p><p>Author Diane Francis joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Mon, 25 Nov 2013 22:03:39 +0000 Stateside Staff 15425 at http://michiganradio.org What would happen if the US and Canada merged together into one big country? Michigan musician tells the story of his battle with leukemia http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-musician-tells-story-his-battle-leukemia <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Whenever you talk about the key players in Michigan's music scene, one of the names that inevitably comes up is that of Stewart </span>Francke<span style="line-height: 1.5;">.</span></p><p>Born in Saginaw, he's made his home, raised his family and built his music career in Metro Detroit.</p><p>Writer and critic Jim McFarlin calls Stewart Francke "Detroit's workingman's troubadour," a title he's earned and maintained over decades of making his music.</p><p>But today we are going to hear about another journey Stewart Francke has been on, a journey into the world of cancer. A journey that began when he was diagnosed with leukemia that forced Stew and his family and circle of friends to join together to wage a ferocious battle.</p><p>He's now telling the story of his cancer battle in his e-book from Untreed Reads. The title says it all, "What Don't Kill Me Just Makes Me Strong."</p><p>Stewart Francke joined us today.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Wed, 06 Nov 2013 20:15:59 +0000 Stateside Staff 15165 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan musician tells the story of his battle with leukemia Royal Oak's Pete Wurdock has a new collection of short stories http://michiganradio.org/post/royal-oaks-pete-wurdock-has-new-collection-short-stories <div><p>Royal Oak writer Pete Wurdock has just published his fourth book. It's a collection of short stories, all of them set in Northern Michigan.</p></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The collection is entitled "Bending Water and Stories Nearby" and it's as interesting to hear what it took for Pete to get this stories written as it is to actually read these 14 stories.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Pete Wurdock joined us in the studio.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>*Listen to the audio above.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><p> Tue, 05 Nov 2013 21:30:35 +0000 Stateside Staff 15143 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Wednesday, October 30th, 2013 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-wednesday-october-30th-2013 <div><p>Michigan is home to five national parks and there are lots of open spaces where you can camp, hunt and enjoy nature. But, yesterday, an Oklahoma Senator recently said two Michigan landmarks are a prime example of wasteful federal spending. We found out what’s behind the senator’s reasoning and whether there is some truth to his concerns.</p></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Then, we took a look at a new proposal by a group of Democrats in the Michigan House that would require the state to determine the actual cost of educating a public school student in Michigan. That got us thinking, shouldn't we already know?&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>We also spoke with Michigan writer Donald Lystra about his new collection of short stories. And, Ann Arbor now has its own Death Café, organized by funeral home guide Merilynne Rush. She stopped by to tell us more about it.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>But, first on the show, e<span style="line-height: 1.5;">ver since the government unveiled its <a href="http://healthcare.gov">healthcare.gov</a> website, the headlines surrounding the Affordable Care Act have been about the problems with the way the site was designed and the extreme difficulty Americans have had in getting on the exchange. </span>But what about the Americans that don't need healthcare.gov? The ones who already have plans? To those consumers, President Obama has been saying this since 2009:</div><blockquote><p>“If you like your current insurance, you will keep your current insurance. No government takeover, nobody’s changing what you’ve got if you’re happy with it.”</p></blockquote><p>So why, then, then are some 2 million Americans - about 140,000 in Michigan - getting cancelation letters from their insurers over the past couple of weeks?</p><p>Marianne Udow-Phillips directs the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation, a non-profit partnership between the University of Michigan and Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Michigan. She joined us today.</p><p> Wed, 30 Oct 2013 20:22:33 +0000 Stateside Staff 15060 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Wednesday, October 30th, 2013 Michigan author publishes new collection of short stories http://michiganradio.org/post/michigan-author-publishes-new-collection-short-stories <p>Short stories are in the spotlight in the literary world after Canadian writer Alice Munro recently won the 2013 Nobel Prize in literature. She's widely considered to be the "master of the short story."</p><p>The Michigan writer Donald Lystra is just out with his collection of short stories called "Something That Feels Like Truth."</p><p>Donald Lystra is an engineer who turned to writing later in life. His debut novel "Season of Water and Ice" won the Midwest Book Award and the Michigan Notable Book Award.</p><p>Donald Lystra joined us today in the studio.</p><p><em>Listen to the full interview above.</em></p><p> Wed, 30 Oct 2013 20:06:18 +0000 Stateside Staff 15057 at http://michiganradio.org Michigan author publishes new collection of short stories Three Michigan books to read this fall http://michiganradio.org/post/three-michigan-books-read-fall <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">We&#39;ve welcomed autumn here in Michigan, many of us with open arms. It is a beautiful season in our state.</span></p><p>And one of the pleasures of changing seasons is being able to talk with poet and writer Keith Taylor.</p><p>Keith joined us today with his picks for our autumn reading, books set-in Michigan written by Michigan authors. This time, he focused on writing from the Upper Peninsula.</p><p> Mon, 07 Oct 2013 21:06:16 +0000 Stateside Staff 14750 at http://michiganradio.org Three Michigan books to read this fall Stateside for Monday, October 7th, 2013 http://michiganradio.org/post/stateside-monday-october-7th-2013 <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">A recent report from Moody&#39;s suggests the future is very uncertain for public universities. Today we talked about&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">the future of public universities in Michigan.</span></p><p>And, poet Keith Taylor stopped by the studios to introduce us to some Michigan must-reads for the month of October.</p><p>Also, despite our troubled economy, Michigan franchises are going strong. We spoke to DBusiness editor R.J. King about the 2013 Michigan Franchise Report.</p><p>First on the show, it&rsquo;s Day Seven of the partial government shutdown.</p><p>U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew is warning that lawmakers are &ldquo;playing with fire&rdquo; and he&rsquo;s asking Congress to pass legislation to re-open the government, and to increase the nation&rsquo;s debt limit.</p><p>Lew says President Obama has no intentions of linking either bill to Republican demands to change the health care law.</p><p>This comes as Republican House Speaker John Boehner rules out a House vote on a temporary spending bill without concessions from the President.</p><p>So, that&rsquo;s where things stand as the government shutdown moves into its second week. Michigan Democratic Representative Dan Kildee joined us from D.C. to discuss the issue.&nbsp;</p><p> Mon, 07 Oct 2013 14:52:36 +0000 Stateside Staff 14748 at http://michiganradio.org Stateside for Monday, October 7th, 2013