national forest http://michiganradio.org en Hunting, snowmobiling preserved in areas of the Huron-Manistee National Forest http://michiganradio.org/post/hunting-snowmobiling-preserved-areas-huron-manistee-national-forest <p>In 2010, a man successfully sued the U.S. Forest Service saying the agency did not incorporate enough land for quiet recreation in the Huron-Manistee National Forest.</p><p>He said more land for these activities should have been set aside in the USFS&#39; 2006 forest management plan.</p><p>Here&#39;s how the plaintiff, Kurt Meister, explained it in <a href="http://michiganradio.org/post/suing-quiet-recreation-forest">a story by Michigan Radio</a> back in 2010:</p><blockquote><p>&ldquo;This case isn&rsquo;t about hunting. It&rsquo;s not about gun hunting. It&rsquo;s not about stopping gun hunting. It&rsquo;s simply saying it shouldn&rsquo;t be everywhere. And if you make it everywhere, you&rsquo;re affecting other people&rsquo;s rights.&rdquo;</p></blockquote><p>In that report, Interlochen Public Radio&#39;s Bob Allen explained that &quot;what Kurt Meister is asking the court to do is set aside areas designated as non-motorized for quiet recreation.</p><p>Those are places where, on paper, the forest plan says a person can expect to be isolated from the sights and sounds of other humans.</p><p>But on the ground, Meister says, what happens is that snowmobile trails and cross country ski trails run side by side.&quot;</p><p>Today, the U.S. Forest Service <a href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/hmnf/news-events/?cid=STELPRDB5350260">released its revised plan</a> in response to the 2010 decision by the federal court.</p><p>The Forest Service says it will:</p><ul><li>Continue to allow gun hunting in the previously designated Semiprimitive Nonmotorized and Primitive areas of the Huron-Manistee National Forests in accordance with regulations of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.</li><li>Continue to allow snowmobiling on designated trails within the Huron-Manistee National Forests.</li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Ken Arbogast of the U.S. Forest Service says for the public visiting the national forest, very little will change.</p><p>What&#39;s changed, he said, is the description of these areas. The plan now describes the areas in contention as areas that are &quot;more secluded&quot; and &quot;less roaded&quot; - but it does not leave the impression that noise from human activity will be absent.</p><p>The Huron-Manistee forest covers about 1 million acres of land. The land in contention covers about 70,000 acres. Tue, 31 Jan 2012 22:23:06 +0000 Mark Brush 6030 at http://michiganradio.org Hunting, snowmobiling preserved in areas of the Huron-Manistee National Forest Cutting down a Christmas tree in the national forest http://michiganradio.org/post/cutting-down-christmas-tree-national-forest <p>Most of us get our Christmas trees from a lot or a farm.</p><p>But if you have a saw and five bucks, you can cut down a tree in the national forest. Peter Payette took his family out to do it the old fashioned way and sent this report:</p><p>It&rsquo;s true that five bucks is not much to pay for a tree, but it&rsquo;ll cost you some time and gas money to get there.</p><p>The first stop is at a <a href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/hmnf/home/?cid=STELPRDB5275181">U.S. Forest Service office to buy a tag</a>.</p><p>There&rsquo;s one in Cadillac where Dianne Berry sells us our tags and helps us get our bearings.</p><p>&ldquo;This is a two sided map... the other side has the area closest to Manistee. And on the Huron-Manistee we have almost a million acres.&rdquo;</p><p>That means there are 500,000 acres of trees just on this side of the state, between Cadillac and Big Rapids!</p><p> Tue, 13 Dec 2011 15:50:33 +0000 Rebecca Williams 5365 at http://michiganradio.org Cutting down a Christmas tree in the national forest Suing for quiet recreation in the forest http://michiganradio.org/post/suing-quiet-recreation-forest <p>A man who’s been dogging the U.S. Forest Service to make some parts of the Huron Manistee Forest off limits to gun hunters and snowmobilers won his case in federal court this fall.</p><p><a href="http://environmentreport.org/show.php?showID=491">As Bob Allen reports</a>, the Court says forest managers have to consider setting aside roughly 70,000 acres for quiet uses such as hiking, bird watching and cross country skiing.</p><p>Kurt Meister sued the Forest Service as one citizen, and it's unusual to get as far as he has with his legal challenge.&nbsp; He says:</p><blockquote><p>“This case isn’t about hunting. It’s not about gun hunting. It’s not about stopping gun hunting. It’s simply saying it shouldn’t be everywhere. And if you make it everywhere, you’re affecting other people’s rights.”</p></blockquote><p>The Forest Service points out they have to manage forests for multiple uses, and try to balance those uses with a minimum amount of conflict.&nbsp; Jeff Pullen is a biologist in charge of writing the plan for the Huron Manistee.</p><blockquote><p>“Really, if you look at the 2,000 or so comments we got on the plan, we had one person asking for this. And we felt, from an agency perspective, it didn’t seem reasonable to develop a separate alternative that looked at this issue that one person was raising.”</p></blockquote><p>&nbsp;</p><p> Thu, 16 Dec 2010 18:47:47 +0000 Rebecca Williams 621 at http://michiganradio.org Suing for quiet recreation in the forest