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If you think we’ve got troubles now, flash back eighty-two years ago today. Unemployment in Detroit was more than forty percent – and there was no social safety net.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks to Congress.
PBS NewsHour / screenshot from YouTube

This week, Jack Lessenberry and Emily Fox discuss Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech, a new push toward financial stability for Detroit’s schools and the Michigan Chamber of Commerce’s decision to sit out Proposal 1.


Adoptions by LGBT parents are at the center of this controversy.
user stevendamrun / Flickr

A state House committee approved the legislation this morning.

The bills would allow agencies that take money from the state for placing children with families to turn away same-sex couples. There would have to be a sincere religious objection and a good-faith effort to refer the couples to another adoption service.

Detroit to get "pay by plate" parking

3 hours ago
wikihow

DETROIT (AP) – Detroit plans to roll out a parking system that uses technology tied to license plates in an effort to improve enforcement efficiency and increase options for payment.

Chief Operating Officer Gary Brown told The Detroit News that a $3 million contract will transform its metering system to “pay-by-plate,” rather than by space.

via Detroit Public Schools

The Detroit Public Schools’ emergency manager has laid out a plan he says should get the district on a “sustainable path” by the end of his 18-month term.

Darnell Earley’s restructuring plan has some short-term specifics, such as convening a summit of Detroit’s “education service providers” to discuss putting a moratorium on creating new schools before fall 2015; identifying further potential school and “substandard facility” closures; and establishing a task force to deal with the district’s high population of special education students.

Jack Amick / Flickr

People who attack sports referees would face tougher penalties under legislation in the state Senate.

Under the bills, a person would face up to three years in prison and a maximum fine of $10,000 for attacking a referee.

Inside the Michigan Senate
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

State lawmakers are debating whether someone should face penalties if they fail to act when they know someone else is in danger.

A state Senate panel is holding hearings on the concept – but no bill has been introduced yet.

Prison bars.
Thomas Hawk / Flickr

If you are a 17-year-old and you break a law here in Michigan, you’re going to be tried as an adult.

Michigan is one of nine states that tries 17-year-olds as adults.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Everyone knows this has been a brutally cold winter in Michigan.

And not just for people.

Polar cold temps have resulted in Michigan lakes and rivers icing over to record degrees. That’s left little open water for ducks to feed.

Punya Mishra

A Michigan State University professor is using ambigrams to explore creative ways of thinking and playing. "Ambigram is a way of writing words so they can be read in many ways." 

Punya Mishra is a Professor of Educational Psychology and Educational Technology. His designs are being displayed at the MSU Museum. The exhibition is called “Deep-Play: Creativity in Math and Art through Visual Wordplay.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks to Congress.
PBS NewsHour / screenshot from YouTube

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made his much anticipated speech to Congress today. He made his case against a potential nuclear deal being negotiated with Iran by major powers, including the United States.

Watch the speech here.

pixabay.com

Freezing temperatures and drifts of snow likely took a small bite out of U.S. auto sales last month, but most automakers are still reporting gains thanks to the strong economy.

General Motors' sales rose 4.2% over last February, while Chrysler's sales were up 5.6%. Nissan's sales were up 2.7%. However, those gains were smaller than analysts had predicted.

Years ago, the Green Party in Germany was torn by a split between two groups nicknamed the “realos” and the “fundis.”

The realos believed you had to compromise to achieve anything in modern, consumer-oriented capitalist society.

LaughFest image.
LaughFest

Gilda’s LaughFest 2015 kicks off in Grand Rapids this Thursday (March 5).

The 10-day comedic festival will feature stand-up, comedy films, improv, comedy showcases and more all over West Michigan.

The festival was started by Gilda’s Club Grand Rapids, a survivor support group named after the late comic Gilda Radner.

You can see a full list of the events and venues here.

User:Phils1stPix / Flicker

 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service commissioned a report on the commercial grass carp industry. Grass carp are one of four species of Asian carp that officials are concerned about.

They’re used to control vegetation in lakes and ponds, and some people like to eat them. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Today’s wintry mix of snow, rain and sleet is not stopping Michigan State University’s major nuclear science project from moving forward into a new construction phase. 

350 truckloads of concrete are being poured today into the pit that will eventually be the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams. 

That’s enough to cover a football field in two feet of concrete. 

michigan.gov

Gov. Rick Snyder is getting some tough questions about the May ballot proposal to boost road funding at his education and economic summit this week in Detroit.

The plan would raise the state’s sales tax from 6% to 7% and boost road funding by about a $1 billion a year.

user metassus / Flickr

Michigan has joined the appeal of a federal judge’s decision to restore endangered species protections to the gray wolf.

Animal rights and wildlife groups challenged the de-listing in an effort to stop wolf hunting in Michigan and other Midwestern states. Michigan voters rejected wolf hunting last year – although that referendum was circumvented by the Legislature. However, wildlife groups succeeded in court where they failed politically when a federal judge last month restored the protections.

Battle Creek Police patch.
C. Holmes / Flickr

The city of Battle Creek was in the CBS spotlight last night.

The network premiered its new police "dramedy" from Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan.

"Battle Creek" focuses on a pair of very  mismatched law enforcement officers: FBI agent Milt Chamberlain, played by Josh Duhamel, and Battle Creek detective Russ Agnew, played by Dean Winters.

moppet65535 / Creative Commons

The coalition pushing state lawmakers to give all workers paid sick days is growing. Groups backing bills introduced in Lansing last month held press conferences in Detroit, Flint and Kalamazoo Monday.

Danielle Atkinson, who directs Mothering Justice, an advocacy group for working moms, was in Grand Rapids. If passed, she says the bills would help more than workers.

“99% of restaurant employees don’t have access to one paid sick day and what that really translates into is restaurant workers going to work sick and getting everyone else sick and it becomes a public health issue,” Atkinson said.

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