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Defer Elementary School in Grosse Pointe Park.
Appraiser / Creative Commons http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Public schools in Bloomfield Hills and Birmingham are already charging tuition for students outside the district who want to attend. Now, because of budget cuts and declining enrollment, it looks like Grosse Pointe Public Schools might follow suit. This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about why the Grosse Pointe school board is looking at a $13,000 annual tuition fee for students who don't live in-district.

They also discuss why the Michigan Civil Rights Commission wants the U.S. Supreme Court to take up a case challenging the state's emergency manager law, another attempt to overhaul the state's auto insurance laws, and higher speed limits for some rural Michigan freeways.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The next phase of Flint’s lead pipe replacement gets underway this weekend.

To date, slightly more than 850 service lines have been replaced, as part of the city’s response to pipes leaching lead into Flint’s drinking water.

The goal this year is 6,000.  

“With more work crews in the field starting next week, service lines to 900 homes will be replaced each month, so we’ll really start making progress,” says Flint Mayor Karen Weaver. 

User mgreason / wikimedia commons

A conservation group is raising questions about Dow Chemical's attempts to convince the Trump administration to drop studies that show Dow's pesticides could harm endangered species.

Daniel Howes / Detroit News

As wake up calls go, think tank reports ain’t much.

Yeah, they marshal the grim statistics. They make harsh comparisons. They tell the people who bother to read them, mostly the already converted, just how Michigan is failing in education and job growth, in per-capita income and in the number of adults who work.

Describing what’s broken is easy. Moving voters and their representatives to act is hard. The sad truth about the Michigan culture over the past generation is that it doesn’t move much without a full-blown crisis like the auto collapse or Detroit’s bankruptcy.

A rally in support of Jose Luis Sanchez-Ronquillo at Bach Elementary School
Catherine Shaffer

Supporters of Jose Luis Sanchez-Ronquillo rallied at Ann Arbor's Bach Elementary School today to protest his deportation. Sanchez-Ronquillo has been detained by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement since April 19. He is married with two children in Ann Arbor schools, and is the primary breadwinner for the family.

Sanchez-Ronquillo has been fighting to remain in the U.S. since a 2012 court order for his removal. He was detained during what his family thought was a routine immigration check-in. 

The Washington Writer's Academy in Kalamazoo
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Detroit and at least seven other Michigan school districts have reached an agreement with Michigan’s Department of Education to allow more than 35 schools to stay open for at least the next three years.

All the schools performed in the bottom 5% on standardized tests for at least three consecutive years.

The state’s School Reform Office, or SRO, caused an uproar in January when it sent letters directly to parents announcing the potential closures without first notifying local school officials.

Girl Scouts Heart of Michgian filed a lawsuit against Girl Scouts USA April 19.
flickr user Joe Gratz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A Girl Scouts council from Michigan is suing the national Girl Scouts organization for making changes to the employee pension plan without proper consent.

In the lawsuit, Girl Scouts Heart of Michigan claims the national group, Girl Scouts USA, added people to the pension plan, and then passed the added costs on to local councils like Heart of Michigan. Girl Scouts U.S.A. (GSUSA) manages the pension plan for Girl Scouts council employees nationwide.

A map showing cities sending a bus to People's Climate March.
Michigan Climate Action Network

Several hundred people from Michigan got on buses today to ride all night to Washington, D.C., to attend the 2017 People's Climate March.

Andrew Sarpolis with the Sierra Club organized the bus leaving from Detroit. He says many of the buses sold out early.

"Flint filled up almost a month ago," he says. "Our bus filled up a week in advance, and I believe the Ann Arbor bus as well, so all across the board, we're really seeing a lot of interest in going to this march."

bertozland / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The first mammal cloned by scientists was Dolly the Sheep, in 1997. There were concerns at the time about Dolly because the cell used to clone her was from a six year old sheep. Dolly died young. The conclusion at the time was that Dolly more or less was born at six years of age – the same age as the cell.

But cloning research has continued since the announcement of Dolly in 1997.

Laura Nawrocik / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Three years ago, not long after the city of Flint switched its water source to the Flint River, residents began to complain about the quality of the water coming into their homes.

The State of Michigan, however, denied the problem for a long time. It wasn’t until activists and news media proved there was a problem that the state finally did something.

This week, the state Senate passed a supplemental appropriations bill which included federal dollars for Flint. Stateside’s Lester Graham spoke with Arlan Meekhof, the Republican Majority Leader of the Senate, about that bill, and the future of funding for Flint.

Three years after the anniversary of Flint switching their water source over to the Flint River, which led to the water crisis, the Michigan Legislature has taken very little action to prevent a similar situation from happening elsewhere.
Pkay Chelle / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The weekly political roundup on Stateside tackles a few of the biggest stories of the week. Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and a former Republican legislative leader, along with Vicki Barnett, former mayor of Farmington Hills and a former Democratic legislator, joined the show to break it all down.

flickr user vasenka / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 


It's graduation season at the University of Michigan. 

This year, the university celebrates its bicentennial. That means the public university was established in Michigan 20 years before Michigan was a state.

flickr user visionsofgrace / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

In some schools in Michigan, being a lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, or questioning high school student is welcomed and embraced. In other schools, LGBTQ kids have to stay in the closet or endure a backlash from homophobic students, or even teachers and administrators. 

Photos courtesy of VOTEBUSUITOWSU.COM and Renee White

After the 2016 Election, we talked to a few Donald Trump supporters and asked about their vote. With the first 100 days of the Trump presidency just around the corner, Stateside reached out to a couple of those Trump supporters to get their thoughts on his performance as Commander in Chief so far.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The next stop in our Artisans of Michigan series is on a residential street in Highland Park, a city that’s within the City of Detroit.

Celeste Smith is using a small hammer to tack down fabric that’s been soaked in a stiffening agent. She’s making a hat. A fancy one for ladies planning to attend a big hat-wearing event.

“I’m getting ready for the Derby,” she says. Smith has been up all night to keep up with demand. “They’re having the Detroit Derby Day here and I also have some clients going to Louisville,” she said. Big fancy hats are a tradition at the Kentucky Derby.

Three days ago, the Michigan Civil Rights Commission asked the highest court in the land to decide whether our state’s emergency manager law is unconstitutional.

Specifically, the issue is whether the law violates the federal Voting Rights Act by lessening the voting power of minorities. Nearly all the cities and school districts where emergency managers have been appointed had black majority populations.

JOHN AUCHTER / AUCHTOON.COM

ARTIST'S POV: After three years of the Flint water crisis, fatigue has set in — first and foremost, for the citizens of Flint who have had to live with the daily grind and persistent worries. But also for Michiganders living outside and looking in. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mel_Pearson

This week, the University of Michigan did something it hasn’t had to do in 33 years: hire a new hockey coach.

The last time the job opened was 1984. Athletic director Don Canham heard Red Berenson was on campus moving his oldest son, Gordie, into his dorm room. Canham called Berenson to his office, offered him the job for the third time, and Berenson finally took it.

If he hadn’t, it’s not clear who Canham could have hired. After all, the guy Michigan just fired was a failed former high school hockey coach. Michigan was at the bottom of a glorified bus league, with an empty building, and nothing to brag about.

Vintage postcard "Greetings from Grand Haven, Michigan."
Boston Public Library Tichnor Brothers collection / Wikimedia Commons

This time of year a lot of people start thinking about summer vacations. If you’re like many Michiganders, when you’re planning a week or two off, you might find a cottage or a beach house to rent online. Airbnb, VRBO and HomeAway are a few of the most popular short-term rental websites.

A steelworker straddling a beam
Christopher Peplin / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A new report from the AFL-CIO says 134 Michigan workers died on the job in 2015, while 96,000 suffered workplace-related injuries or illnesses.

Those numbers are down slightly from the previous year, but Zack Pohl with the Michigan AFL-CIO says the state still isn’t doing enough to make sure people are safe at work.

People loading cases of bottled water into an SUV
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

All nine state water distribution sites will remain open for at least another month in Flint.

A settlement of a lawsuit gave the state the option to close two of the sites starting in May.

But Mission Flint spokeswoman Tiffany Brown says the number of people picking up cases of bottled water at each of the sites is still high enough to warrant keeping them open.

Brown says Flint residents would receive plenty of notice if the decision to close one or more the sites is made. 

Lindsey Scullen / Michigan Radio

The Environment Report's Rebecca Williams kicked off Tuesday night’s Issues & Ale event at Bell’s Brewery in Kalamazoo with this question:

Where do you get your drinking water?

Mayor Mike Duggan announcing plans for Midtown west development project at Delta Prep Academy in Detroit
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

A new development project is coming to Detroit's Cass Corridor.

Midtown West will be a $77 million development project that will be located at what was once the Wigle Recreation Center near Midtown.

It will include a total of 335 residential units, 175 rental units and 160 units for sale. About 20% of those rental units will be affordable housing.

Councilwoman Raquel Castaneda Lopez represents the district where the project will be.

She says it’s important that development be done with and for the people.

This map shows the probabilities of where oil might go after a spill in the Straits of Mackinac.
From the UM Water Center report

A group hopes to get a ballot question before voters that would ban Enbridge from transporting oil through its Line 5 pipelines, which run under the Straits of Mackinac.

Attorney Jeffrey Hank is with the group, Keep Our Lakes Great.

Hank says while there are other efforts underway, including studies assessing the risks of the pipeline and alternatives to it, "we can't dawdle. After Flint and all these other lessons, we've seen we can't just sit around. So if the state doesn't do something, we're going to put the question before voters."

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Controversial legislation to scrap unlimited, lifetime medical coverage for car crash victims is back up for consideration in Lansing.

Proponents of the current system say the law makes sure victims are taken care of. But Republicans have been trying for decades to scale back the state’s unlimited medical coverage for people injured in car crashes.  

The proposed legislation would let consumers pick their levels of coverage.

Speaker of the House Tom Leonard says auto no-fault overhaul is one of his party’s biggest priorities.

The Flint water treatment plant
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The state Legislature has finally approved a $100 million grant to help Flint replace lead pipes and other water infrastructure. The money originally came from the federal government, but had to be approved by the Legislature as part of a larger budget bill.

That got delayed for weeks as the House and Senate argued over the separate question of money to help Macomb County deal with a giant sinkhole.

State Senator Jim Ananich says he’s glad it all finally got resolved.

Sen. Jim Ananich at Stateside's live show in Flint: "Michigan should lead the way [in water quality standards]. We should have the best standards of anywhere in the country and other people should follow us and we should start that here in Flint."
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

This week brought an important development in the future of Flint and its drinking water.

Mayor Karen Weaver says she wants Flint to return to a long-term agreement with the Detroit-based Great Lakes Water Authority. This reverses the plans to connect Flint to the new, competing Karegnondi Water Authority (KWA).

The Michigan Senate Minority Leader, Senator Jim Ananich, D-Flint, joined Stateside's live show in Flint last Saturday to talk about the state of the city and why something needs to be done about the water rates. 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Donald Trump was elected President by pledging to "Make America Great Again." 

Economist Marina von Neumann Whitman thinks the proposed Trump budget would deeply harm the very things that make our country great.

Screen grab from ONE OF NASSAR'S YOUTUBE VIDEOS

More than 100 women and girls claim they were sexually assaulted by former MSU and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar.

Complaints against the former MSU sports doctor range from the late 1990s up to 2016.

Doc pleads not guilty in female genital mutilation case

Apr 27, 2017
Joe Gratz / flickr

A not-guilty plea has been entered for a Detroit-area doctor charged with performing genital mutilation on two Minnesota girls in a first-of-its-kind case in the United States.

Dr. Jumana Nagarwala appeared in Detroit federal court Thursday, a day after being indicted.

She's charged with six crimes, including conspiracy to bring the girls across state lines. It carries a minimum sentence of 10 years in prison.

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