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MI State Police website

Rebuilding trust between many communities and their police officers will be a long, hard slog.

But everyone agrees it must be done. That was the message from a Congressional working group, which stopped in Detroit Tuesday.

The bipartisan Policing Strategies Working Group is trying to advance that goal with a series of meetings around the country.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing’s mayor has taken the unusual step of declaring a housing emergency in the Capitol city.

Mayor Virg Bernero declared the emergency after a hotel on the city's south side informed dozens of residents they will be evicted in the next few weeks.

The hotel is often used by agencies to place Lansing’s homeless. There are currently nearly 90 homeless people staying at the hotel, including 33 children. 

“We will use every legal tool at our disposal to prevent the owners of this facility from chaining the doors,” says Bernero.

Many motorists cars honked their approval (some expressed their displeasure) at Trump supporters in Saginaw.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Donald Trump campaign staged rallies today in cities across Michigan.

Dozens of Trump supporters took over two corners of one of Saginaw’s busiest intersections.

Local campaign organizer Debra Mantey says this is the way for the Republican nominee to win in Michigan.

“The way we’re going to turn Michigan ‘red’ is by face-to-face, with Michigander to another Michigander,” says Mantey.

Mantey downplays polls showing Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leading in Michigan. She says recent polls showing Trump gaining ground.  

CDC / CDC

Michigan wants college students to go back to school with more than just textbooks.

State health officials are urging college students to make sure they are up to date on vaccinations. 

The recommendation for vaccines comes after a meningitis death of a college student in Macomb County earlier this year.

"Much of what we do in public health is providing the information and the tools by which our college campuses can keep their students healthy," says Dr. Eden Wells, Michigan's chief medical executive. 

Courtesy of Lester Monts

Michigan boasts an exceptionally rich mix of folk, ethnic and immigrant music, and it goes back centuries.

Music professor Lester Monts wanted to capture that rich tapestry, so he spearheaded the Michigan Musical Heritage Project.

The project has three distinct goals: to create a full documentary, a video archive, and a University of Michigan course – all about Michigan’s music.

“We’re such a musical mosaic in this state that so many different immigrant groups, ethnic groups, folk groups have moved into the state and many of them have maintained or compartmentalized much of their music and culture,” Monts said. “But others have sort of fused together in such a way that they have created something very new.”

President Obama greets inmates during a visit to El Reno Federal Correctional Institution in El Reno, Okla., July 16, 2015.
Pete Souza / White House

President Obama is using the power of his office to reduce the sentences of people convicted of nonviolent drug offenses. Today his office announced that he cut short the sentences of 111 federal inmates.

The commutations announced today included three identified as being from Michigan:

Gov. Rick Snyder
gophouse.com

Defending Governor Snyder from Flint-related lawsuits and investigations could cost taxpayers up to $3.4 million. But a state lawmaker says public money shouldn't be used to defend him.

Snyder is extending contracts with two private legal firms who've been representing him. He notified the State Administrative Board on Tuesday: 

Courtesy of Chef Luciano DelSignore

Eat pasta and you could help the people whose lives were shattered by the powerful earthquake that struck central Italy last week.

One of Detroit’s top chefs is joining chefs worldwide in serving a special pasta dish, and he’s calling on other Michigan restaurants to do the same.

Chef Luciano DelSignore joined Stateside to discuss the dish, Pasta all’Amatriciana, and how it’s helping earthquake victims in Italy.

Courtesy of the Michigan Dental Association

There’s been growing awareness that dental health isn’t just about appearance and avoiding cavities. It’s also essential to overall health.

For instance, poor oral health has been tied to cardiovascular disease, respiratory infections like pneumonia, diabetic complications and dementia.

This means it’s crucial to bring dental care to areas and populations that are underserved by dentists.

Some think Senate Bill 1013 could be the way to do that in Michigan.

The bill was introduced earlier this summer by Sen. Mike Shirkey (R-Clark Lake). It’s modeled after a program in Minnesota that set up a midlevel dental professional called a dental therapist.

There were some improvements in test results this year, but the overal picture is still rough.
Alberto G. / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

While several grades made progress in certain subject areas, at least half of Michigan students still scored below “proficient” in every single section of the 2016 state standardized test – that’s math, science, English Language Arts, and social studies.

This is only the second time students have ever taken the M-STEP (Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress) since it was first rolled out in the spring of 2015.

Drinking water fountain.
Gabrielle Emanuel / Michigan Radio

All 94 school buildings in the Detroit Public Schools Community District meet federal standards for lead in water, the city’s health department announced Monday.

It had spent months screening tap water at all the city’s schools for lead and copper, to make sure they met U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards.

“And we’re now confident that children who are drinking water in DPSCD schools are drinking water that’s lead-safe,” says Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, the health department’s director.

Presidential campaign merchandise.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A conservative group is running ads this week in Michigan and three other states asking Republican Donald Trump to withdraw from the presidential race.

The ad features Donald Trump saying he would get out of the race if his poll numbers were bad.  The quotes date back to when Trump was riding high during the Republican primaries.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

The Detroit Public Schools has made “enormous progress” on fixing crumbling school buildings, but there’s still more work to do.

More than 90% of the district’s 94 school buildings are now officially “up to code,” according to city and school district officials.

Detroit’s building department got involved in the situation early this year, after teacher protests that highlighted some decrepit building conditions, among other things, hit the news.

Detroit Federation of Teachers Executive Vice President Terrence Martin says they deserve credit for that.

CMU's central campus.
CMU

Police at Central Michigan University say they're cracking down during the school's "Welcome Weekend ."

The Mount Pleasant police issued 341 citations this past weekend, most of them alcohol-related.

They also arrested 34 people over the weekend. That's up significantly from last year.

Officer Jeff Browne says they've done a lot of student outreach and education efforts. Now, he says, they're stepping up enforcement.

The 2016 M-STEP results come out Tuesday morning
flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

How did Michigan students do on the statewide, standardized test this year?

That's what we'll find out Tuesday morning, when the state Department of Education releases the spring 2016 results of the M-STEP.

Marijuana plant.
USFWS

There will be a new round of court filings this week in the battle to get marijuana legalization on the November ballot. The MI Legalize campaign is expected to file a set of motions Tuesday in an effort to get the case settled in time for the November 2016 election.

Last June, MI Legalize filed a lawsuit with the Michigan Court of Claims challenging a signature rule. The rule says any signatures for a petition gathered outside a 180-day window are invalid. Although MI Legalize had enough signatures to get on the November ballot, too many of them were outside the 180-day window.

Dr. Nia Heard-Garris sits down with Cynthia Canty for an interview on Stateside.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Whenever there's a story of violence that takes over the news cycle, parents face a challenge: How much do you tell your child? How do you answer your child's questions? Do you wade right into what happened and why? Or do you divert them, and try to give them something different to think about?

For parents of color, these challenges come up with each act of police-related violence on black males, or violence aimed at police officers who are just doing their jobs, such as in Dallas or Baton Rouge.

Dr. Nia Heard-Garris is a pediatrician doing research on the impact racism, and these racially-charged news stories, can have on children.

Jerry Coyne owns Q 100.3 in Grayling and hosts music in the afternoons.
Peter Payette

These days, most rock and roll radio stations play a limited number of songs. 

They play those over and over again.

That's because audience research has become so high-tech that stations know exactly what songs attract the most listeners.

The owners of a station in Grayling say classic rock is worn out.

So they launched a counter-offensive and are breaking all the rules about how to run a radio station in the 21st century. 

Bill Schroer told us that we waste about 30% of our food in America.
United States Department of Agriculture

The Next Idea

There's a halfway decent chance you scraped food into the trash can today. Or maybe you pitched an apple core out the car window on your way to work.

If so, then you are contributing to America's food waste problem, and it's a big one.

Some $218 billion big.

Battle Creek wants to be America's test laboratory and lead the way to zero food waste.

flickr user zeevveez / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The time is getting closer for launching special tax-free savings accounts for Michiganders with disabilities.

It's called MI-ABLE, the Achieving a Better Life Experience program. 

MI-ABLE was signed into law in Michigan late last year. Now, word has come that the state has firmed up a contract with a Florida-based company to manage this savings program.

Photo of a cell phone with online comment section.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

You may have read the recent news that NPR decided to discontinue online comments at NPR.org. Editors at NPR reasoned there are better ways to connect with people than what these sections at the bottom of news articles provide.

Michigan Democrats and Republicans held their state conventions last weekend, mainly to nominate candidates for the education boards.

That includes the state board of education, plus two seats each for the three major universities – Wayne State, Michigan State, and the University of Michigan.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The focus is on the November elections with the Republican and Democratic summer nominating conventions wrapped up. Democrats, following their meeting over the weekend in Lansing, are hoping presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will lead them to a string of down-ballot victories if she wins the White House.

“We know in Michigan, that when our voters turn out, we win,” says Michigan Democratic Party Chair Brandon Dillon. “Our voters tend to turn out better in presidential elections, but this is an interesting year.”

Gov. Rick Snyder at the state GOP convention
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Michigan Republicans were in Grand Rapids this past weekend to finalize their slate for the November ballot, and to fire up for the final weeks of the election season.

We try to keep our language pretty clean here at That’s What They Say, but sometimes things just slip out.

Like when we’re explaining the difference between “they’re”, “their,” and “there” for what feels like the millionth time.

Or when we see "for all intensive purposes" in print, and the writer isn't trying to be ironic.

Sometimes it happens when we stub a toe and it really, really hurts.

In any case, for those of us guilty of occasionally uttering words that would make a sailor blush, the phrase “pardon my French” is a go-to apology.

Senior citizens may be way more tech savvy than you think.
flickr user Jason Howie / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Professor Bill Chopik is here to make you feel really bad about all the times you wanted to run, screaming, from the room after trying to teach your grandparents how to download a photo attachment from an email.

The Michigan State University professor just published a study looking at how nearly 600 seniors (average age 68) feel about the technology they use to communicate, how willing they are to learn new types of technology, and how those responses correlate with their loneliness and overall health.

Spacing Magazine / Creative Commons http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth talk about a failed attempt to get recreational pot on the ballot this November, a report that the owners of the Ambassador Bridge might soon throw some legal hurdles down river to block construction of the Gordie Howe Bridge, and the latest chapter in the rivalry between Gov. Rick Snyder and Attorney General Bill Schuette.


Signatures are collected for the MI Legalize campaign.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

As a citizen, you have a right to petition the government for redress of grievances. At the state level, that right and the right to put referenda on the ballot can be restricted or, in some cases, circumvented.

Car accident
Ted Abbott/Flickr

A group of insurance companies that sets a mandatory car insurance fee does not have to say how it comes up with that fee. That decision came today from the Michigan Court of Appeals.

The Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association was created by an act of the Legislature, but it’s run by insurance companies. This year, the MCCA collects $160 on every insured vehicle. The money is used to pay the most-expensive medical bills of victims of car crashes.

Susana Bernabé-Ramirez and her daughter Sayra Hernandez
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

The news came in today that Susana Bernabé-Ramirez and her 16-year-old daughter Sayra Hernandez have been deported. That leaves 11-year-old, American-born Isabella Hernandez here in the United States. This creates an even bigger challenge for the family, because Isabella has epilepsy and needs the medical care that she is receiving here in Michigan.
 

We spoke with Bernabé-Ramirez and Sayra in April as they awaited a stay of removal from the Board of Immigration Appeals.

Their attorney Brad Thompson joined us to talk about this development.

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