User: Michigan Works! Association / Flickr / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

As expected, Gov. Snyder is endorsing Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley to take over his job next year.

Snyder made that official with a public endorsement in Southfield today.

Snyder says he’s been waiting to endorse Calley for governor ever since he picked him to be his lieutenant eight years ago, calling the 40-year-old Calley the right person to continue what he calls Michigan’s recent “comeback.”

Chris Sampson / Flickr Creative Commons HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

The American Civil Liberties Union is calling on Greyhound to end its practice of routinely giving U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents permission to conduct immigration raids on its buses without warrants. It says the CBP is unlawfully interrogating, detaining and arresting passengers.

The state Legislature began discussions Wednesday on the newest plan to make people work for Medicaid.

The bill would require able-bodied adults to perform an average of 30 hours of work, job training, or education every week. Pregnant adults, people with medical disabilities, and others would not be included.

Bill sponsor, Senator Mike Shirkey, R-Clarklake, and the CEO of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, Richard Studley, both agreed that the state’s Medicaid expansion, Healthy Michigan, isn’t working.

striatic / FLICKR - bit.ly/1xMszCg

Imagine going to the dentist and needing a filling, but there’s nothing to numb you up. There’s no novocaine. Just drilling.

Thankfully, we have local anesthesia for dental work and eye surgery. For that, we can thank a man who died 74 years ago today.

Courtesy of Stephanie Peltier

Tomorrow is World Water Day, and the beginning of the International Decade for Action on Water for Sustainable Development.

That’s also the day a very special speaker will stand before the world leaders of the UN General Assembly, delivering a plea to protect the water.

Liz Castro / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

As winter bows out and spring steps in, it becomes maple syrup season.

Kirk Hedding, who owns H & H Sugarbush in Chelsea with his wife Michelle, joined Stateside to discuss how the 2018 season has been shaping up, what the ideal conditions for maple syrup production are, and whether he’s worried that climate change will interrupt his business.

Michigan State Fairground
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Pending the approval of city council, Detroit will purchase roughly 142 acres of land that was once home to the Michigan State Fair. The fairgrounds, purchased by the city for $7 million from the Land Bank Fast Track Authority (MLBFTA) Board of Directors, have sat largely unused for a decade.                                     

detroit police car
Facebook / Detroit Police Most Wanted Fugitives

Detroit police are trying to curb overtime costs that have increased in recent years. The Detroit News reports the city paid $40 million in overtime for Detroit officers during the 2017-18 fiscal year, up from $28.3 million in the 2016-17 fiscal year. The newspaper says that's also up from $16.9 million paid in the 2012-13 fiscal year. Detroit police Chief James Craig says: "There are valid reasons why officers need to work overtime, but we need to better manage it." Union officials say overtime costs will increase if Detroit doesn't do more to retain officers.

A SMART bus.

At one point, Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel was a big proponent of the Southeast Michigan Regional Transit Authority, and its potential to coordinate and boost the region’s lackluster, fragmented transit systems.

But Hackel now seems to have soured on the prospect of more and better transit, and on the RTA itself, just as Wayne County is making a push to put a transit millage before voters in November.

Peeling lead paint.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Starting this summer, Detroit will try a to combat its problem with childhood lead poisoning by heading to what’s usually the source: the homes where children live.

Eastern Michigan University will cut four varsity sports

Mar 20, 2018
Virginia Gordan / Michigan Radio

Softball, wrestling, men's swimming and diving, and women's tennis are the four varsity sports at Eastern Michigan University that have been scheduled for the chopping block at the end of the 2018 spring season. 

According to EMU officials, the move is part of the university's efforts to address serious budget challenges that are in part attributable to declining student credit hour enrollments and steep declines in state appropriations.

Governor Rick Snyder signing the bill that will allow for autonomous vehicles to be driven on public roads.
Ryan Burklow / Executive Office of Gov. Rick Snyder

Michigan lawmakers are comfortable with the state’s current driverless vehicle laws. In 2016, the governor signed into law regulations on autonomous vehicles. Those also allow for testing of self-driving cars on state roads.

But this week an autonomous vehicle struck and killed a pedestrian in Arizona.

Governor Rick Snyder has championed autonomous vehicles for a while. He said they need to find out all the issues associated with the death, but he’s not sure it will stall development of autonomous vehicles.


Governor Rick Snyder has signed a budget bill that accelerates spending on road repairs in time to help with the spring and summer construction season.

The bill shifts $175 million from next year’s construction season to use this coming spring and summer to fix roads.

“You’re going to see a lot of (orange) barrels in every corner of Michigan,” he said.

But this spending on repairs is still not expected to keep pace with the rate at which roads are crumbling following a freeze-and-thaw winter’s that’s been brutal on pavement.

Tax breaks for poor neighborhoods steered to booming pockets in Detroit

Mar 20, 2018
Downtown Detroit Skyline
Bridge Magazine / Bridge Magazine

Detroit is a city with abundant need. The poorest big city in America, there are few corners that couldn’t use help.

So critics wonder why a new federal tax incentive program – intended to benefit the poorest neighborhoods in the nation – is poised to help areas of Detroit that are doing the best. And it’s not just the Motor City; state officials have also designated areas in some affluent counties in northern Michigan.

Uber self driving vehicle in Pittsburgh.
Rex / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The inevitable has happened. On Sunday, a self-driving car operated by Uber in Tempe, Arizona, struck and killed a woman as she walked her bike across an intersection. The car was in self-driving mode with a human backup driver.

In response to the accident, Uber suspended all road-testing of its autonomous vehicles in Phoenix, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, and Toronto.

But what consequences could this accident have on the emerging technology that could be a huge part of Michigan's future economy?

GM to mass-produce autonomous vehicle in Michigan plants

Mar 20, 2018
GM Cruise LLC

General Motors announced last Thursday that it would spend $100 million to begin making production versions of its self-driving electric Chevy Bolt sedans at its Orion Township and Brownstown plants. The “Cruise AV,” will be the company’s first production-ready vehicle built to operate without a steering wheel, pedals, or manual controls.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Open-records disclosures can no longer include information on cybersecurity plans and vulnerabilities in Michigan.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement - or ICE - agents
U.S. Air Force / Creative Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Deportations and arrests of undocumented immigrants without criminal records soared in President Donald Trump's first year of office.

The Detroit Free Press analyzed data from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and U.S Border Patrol (USBP), and found a significant increase in the deportations and arrests of non-criminal immigrants.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing’s mayor is putting the sale of city hall “on hold”.

Last year, former Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero picked Chicago-based Beitler Real Estate Services over three other developers, to turn Lansing city hall into a new hotel. 

Lansing officials settled on the idea of selling city hall, since the estimated $55 million cost of renovating the aging building would be cost prohibitive.

Doctor's stethoscope

Five years ago, Governor Rick Snyder got the legislature to agree to accept a federal program that expanded eligibility for Medicaid to some of the poorest people in this state. Prior to that, except for seniors, only people at or below the poverty level were eligible. The new program increased that to include those just a bit better off.

Lucas Fare / Unsplash

The University of Michigan is teaming up with the city of Detroit to fight poverty and promote economic mobility.

The university’s Poverty Solutions program announced it will put up to $2 million into an effort to understand and promote the sources of upward mobility in the city.

Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Lansing needs to step up and provide adequate roads funding or else tell local governments they’re on their own, Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel said Monday.

Hackel blasted the Michigan Legislature’s 2015 “fix” that raised fuel taxes and driver registration fees, but generates far too little revenue for the state’s actual infrastructure needs. He made those remarks as Macomb unveiled a new online resource about county road conditions, and what it will cost to fix them.

A football field.
user: Michael Knight / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

In 2015, back when Destin Julian was a junior on the Hamady High School varsity football team, he took a hard hit to the head, and seemed dazed.

“He was a little bit out on his feet, as it was described,” said David Shiener, Julian's attorney. “And at that point he should be monitored.”

Olivia Cowan
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Lawmakers in Lansing have been working on legislation in response to the Larry Nassar case. And while they’re at it, some say they might want to clarify who counts as a victim when it comes to giving impact statements at a defendant’s sentencing.

Potholes on a road in Ann Arbor.
Daniel Hensel / Michigan Radio

This week, Governor Snyder is expected to sign a bill sending an extra $175 million in one-time funds to our state and local roads. That money supplements $2.3 billion in ongoing funds this year. 

Kirk Steudle, director of the Michigan Department of Transportation, joined Stateside again to answer one more MI Curious question about Michigan's roads. 

Thousands of students in Michigan walked out of their classrooms last week to protest gun violence. They don’t want guns in schools, and they especially want assault rifles banned.

Personally, I would probably go even farther. I don’t think anyone should be allowed to own an assault rifle, except if it were kept under lock and key at a shooting range.

But the tragedy of the student protests is this:

Nobody wants to say this, but they aren’t going to go anywhere. The lobbyists of the NRA can count votes. They are mostly silent now, except for the stupidest among them.

People who remember, remember Republican John Engler as a blunt, pugnacious governor. And, before that, the same as state Senate majority leader.

Palmer Park Preparatory Academy.
via Facebook

One Detroit school that’s shut down because of building problems will be housed in another school building for the rest of this year.

Palmer Park Preparatory Academy was shut down because of a leaky roof and mold problems. The Detroit Public Schools Community District closed the building for the rest of the year to replace the roof.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This week, public transit officials from Michigan and across the country will be in Washington D.C. to lobby for more public transportation funding.

There is concern the Trump administration is not including public transit in some of its funding proposals.

“We hope that a new infrastructure package will be kind to transit,” says Edgar Bening, the general manager of the Flint Metropolitan Transit Authority. “We have many needs.”

Bening is also in D.C. to push for a change in Medicare rules to allow recipients to get reimbursed when they use public transit for medical appointments. 

“If we can get this amendment… this change…it’s going to help our community and across the country,” says Bening.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Former Flint emergency manager Darnell Earley is scheduled to appear in court Monday.

Earley served as Flint’s emergency manager from September 2013 through January 2015.

It was during that time the city’s drinking water source was switched to the Flint River with disastrous results.

Prosecutors charged Earley with Misconduct in Office, Neglect of Duty and False Pretenses.  He’s also facing an involuntary manslaughter charge.

The judge overseeing Earley’s preliminary exam will decide if there’s enough evidence to send the case to trial.