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John U. Bacon

Sunday marks my third father’s day. I had no idea what I was doing for the first two and, it seems, little more this time around. But the kid keeps growing anyway.

I don’t care what anyone says. The first three months are hard. You’re not getting any sleep, and the kid isn’t walking, talking, or even giving you an occasional laugh or a smile. But then things pick up.

Teddy was an early talker and a late walker. Imagine that! The genes are strong with this one. Well, kid, welcome to sports writing!

John Auchter / Michigan Radio

Michigan state Senator and gubernatorial candidate Patrick Colbeck was involved in recent efforts to update the social studies curriculum for K–12 public schools. Colbeck's stated goals were to “remove partisanship from the classroom” and move students towards a more "politically neutral" dialogue that offers a balanced view of historical issues. 

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

One Detroit family celebrated getting a new home Thursday, as they also called for other families like them to receive similar compensation as victims of what they call “illegal” foreclosures.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Vice President Mike Pence will be in Michigan Friday. 

He’s helping to raise money for one of the Republicans running for governor.

Pence is the key note speaker at a noon hour fundraiser for Attorney General Bill Schuette’s gubernatorial campaign at the Townsend Hotel in Birmingham.

Vote Here sign
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s voting age could be lowered to 16 if lawmakers pass a bill that was introduced this week.

This bill, sponsored by Senator David Knezek and Representative Yousef Rabhi, follows an outpouring of teen advocacy after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglass High School in Parkland, Florida in February. The legislators hope to give teenagers a voice in the political process-- after all, they say, the political process impacts 16 year olds.

Charlie LeDuff's Sh*tshow
Penguin Random House

Charlie LeDuff has been busy. Over the last few years, he’s hung out at the Mexican border waiting for undocumented immigrants to be ferried across the Rio Grande on a jet ski. He's chatted up conspiracy theorists at the Cliven Bundy standoff with the federal government, and he's tried not to get hit by rubber bullets or worse in Ferguson, Missouri.  

The DEQ PFAS Investigation Map near Rockford, MI
From Google map provided by Wolverine Worldwide

There has been a lot of coverage of PFAS in the news. That's shorthand for per- and polyfluorinated substances, and it’s a class of chemicals commonly found in stain proof, water-resistant, and nonstick products.

A lot of the news coverage mentions that the chemicals can be harmful to humans. But what exactly does that mean? 

Courtney Carignanan assistant professor in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Michigan State University, joined Stateside to help us answer that question. 

Serena Maria Daniels
Serena Maria Daniels

 


Detroit has one of the largest populations of African-Americans among major US cities. But you might not know it based on what you see in the media, which often highlights the growth and development of white-owned businesses as signs of the city's comeback. 

There's a new journalism outlet looking to challenge that narrative. 

Tostada Magazine is a digital publication celebrating the range individuals who contribute to Detroit's food world. It aims to use food as a tool to discuss the issues facing communities of color and immigrants in the metro area. 

Hand holding
User: Mrs. Logic/flickr

 


The world is still reeling from the recent deaths of designer Kate Spade and chef and writer Anthony Bourdain. These tragedies have drawn the country's attention as rates of suicide continue to climb.

 

Judge removed from cases over misconduct allegations

Jun 14, 2018
wikimedia commons

Livingston County District Court Judge Theresa Brennan has been removed from cases until further notice. County Chief Judge Miriam Cavanaugh made the decision to reassign Brennan following the filing of a 66-page complaint against Brennan by the Michigan Judicial Tenure Commission. 

Jackson 5
CBS Television / Wikimedia Commons / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

A planned ceremony to name part of a street in Detroit’s theater district after Michael Jackson has been cancelled, the Detroit Free Press reported yesterday.

A diver inspects Enbridge's Line 5 pipeline under the Straits of Mackinac for a possible dent.
Enbridge inspection video shared with the state of Michigan

A Canadian company will turn in a report tomorrow outlining whether it thinks a tunnel under the Straits of Mackinac is a feasible option for its pipeline. A tunnel was suggested by Michigan Governor Rick Snyder.

PFAS foam washing up on the shore of Van Ettan Lake.
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

UPDATE: This story was updated on 6/14/18 at 1:38 pm

Last fall Anthony Spaniola discovered a white foam had washed up on the shore of his family’s cottage on Van Etten Lake in Oscoda.

“It’s unusual and it’s kind of sticky, and it piles up and it’s a little bit sudsy looking,” says Spaniola. “It’s something that would probably attract a child… but it’s not something you’d want your child playing in.”

Spaniola knew exactly what that funny looking foam was.

“Maybe it wasn’t quite panic, but it was a feeling of dread,” he says.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Two academics who’ve played key roles in the Flint water crisis are now facing off in a lawsuit.

Consumers Energy

Consumers Energy plans to dramatically increase its use of solar energy by the year 2040.

It's a big part of the utility's first long-term energy plan, required by Michigan's new energy law.

CEO Patti Poppe says solar is clean energy, and the cost of providing it is likely to come down by 35% by 2040.

And she says solar is one of the best options for providing electricity at times of peak demand.

Birth control pills.
Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


The Michigan Legislature has approved a new budget that cuts funding to Planned Parenthood. The new provision would stop money for family planning and reproductive services from going to any group that also performs abortions. 

This budget now heads to Governor Snyder’s desk for final approval. 

Lori Carpentier is president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Michigan. She spoke with Stateside about implications of these potential cuts. 

Field of corn
Flickr/Vampire Bear

 


Globally, climate change is going to cause serious upheaval. But the kinds of changes will vary from place to place. That means there are likely to be both winners and losers in a changing climate.  

As science refines its predictions about the impact of climate change, it's getting easier to see who will end up in each column. 

Bruno Basso is a Michigan State University Foundation Professor in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department. He spoke with Stateside about his new study on climate change and crop growth in the Midwest.

Red Lion restaurant sign in Grand Rapids
Rolin Stone Timmerman - Flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

A $330,000 state grant will help redevelop a contaminated site in Grand Rapids.

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality approved the grant for the brownfield site earlier this week.

Kara Wood, who oversees the city’s Brownfield Redevelopment Authority, says the grant moves the project forward.

“So this approval helps them cross that starting line to get started on those environmental activities in order to demolish the building and construct the project that they intend to build,” Wood said.

Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Environmental groups say a bill headed for Governor Rick Snyder’s desk could increase the amount of invasive species in the Great Lakes.

The bill involves ballast water. That’s water large ships collect to help stabilize their vessel. The ships gather the water in one region, taking plant and animal species with them, and then when the ship doesn’t need the water, it dumps it someplace else. The bill loosens the treatment regulations on that water before it’s dumped into the Great Lakes.

kids at a desk
Mr. Ullman's Class / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Gay rights, Roe v. Wade, climate change and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). These are just a few of the references that state Senator Patrick Colbeck and a group of conservative leaders hope to eliminate from K-12 public school social studies curriculum.

Adam Crosswhite
Michigan Center

 


In the 1840s, a black family fleeing slavery found refuge in Marshall, Michigan. Only a few years later, after settling into their new home, relatives of their former owners arrived to capture and return them to Kentucky. 

But the town of Marshall, including the sheriff and prominent white and black citizens, stepped in to protect the family. 

This week marks 160 years since Giltner v. Gorham, the case between the Kentucky slave owner Francis Giltner and the citizens of Marshall he sued for their successful efforts to shield the escaped family. 

cmh2315fl / FLICKR - HTTP//J.MP/1SPGCL0

The city of Toledo, Ohio and its suburbs are arguing about how to properly charge for water. The disagreement stems from the 2014 toxic cyanobacteria bloom in Lake Erie that shut down of the city's water system.

Sarah Elms, a reporter with The Toledo Blade, joined Stateside to explain what's happening. 

An elevated view of a Vaudeville Theater
Shannon O'Toole / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

It’s time for another edition of Theater TalkDavid Kiley, editor-in-chief of Encore Michigan, joined Stateside to preview and review what's on stage around Michigan.

Wikimedia Commons

The University of Michigan announced Monday that it had updated its Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities to provide narrower definitions of “bullying” and “harassment.”

This came on the same day the United States Department of Justice expressed their interest in a free speech lawsuit against the University of Michigan.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The city of Flint is close to getting back a major water customer it lost during the city’s water crisis.

General Motors took its Flint engine plant off city water in the fall of 2014, after determining the water was corroding engine parts.  It was an early sign of problems with Flint’s drinking water.

Dwight Burdette / wikimedia commons

Michigan would legalize online gambling under a bill passed by the state House.

Lawmakers voted 68-40 Tuesday night for two main bills to create a Lawful Internet Gaming Act that would regulate online versions of licensed casino games.

michigan state capitol building
Brian Charles Watson / wikimedia commons

The Michigan Legislature has officially begun its summer vacation. Before they left, legislators considered a number of complicated issues, including Medicaid work requirements and school safety proposals. 

To sort out the latest from the state capitol, Michigan Radio’s Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Rick Pluta, the Lansing bureau chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network.


Update, June 13 at 10:30 a.m.:

The group Citizens Protecting Michigan’s Constitution has filed an appeal with the state Supreme Court and asked the justices to put an immediate hold on the lower court decision that would place the question on the November ballot.

For Rent sign
Kurt Bauschardt / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The city of Grand Rapids has a proposed ordinance that aims to protect renters from predatory landlords.

But residents at a public hearing during a city commission meeting last night don’t think the ordinance is harsh enough on bad landlords.

The ordinance would fine landlords $50 for not returning application fees to prospects who were rejected. Each additional infraction would increase the amount landlords must pay.

Drew, Cooper & Anding / YouTube Video

A new law extends the statute of limitations for victims of sexual assaults to file lawsuits, and for suspects to face prosecution. It was signed Tuesday by Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley while Governor Rick Snyder is out of the country.

The legislation had an army of advocates behind it – the survivors of 20 years of sexual abuse by disgraced sports doctor Larry Nassar. But they also say the new law is not enough.

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