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A homeless man next to a garbage bag under a tree
Flickr/Elvert Barnes / http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

A Detroit non-profit that helps people who are homeless or facing eviction is losing a major chunk of its funding.

Ted Phillips, director of United Community Housing Coalition, says the Department of Housing and Urban development (HUD) isn’t renewing two grants UCHC relies on for 40% of its annual funding.

“We’ve had a housing placement program the entire time that I’ve been here since 1986. And the thought of that being lost is just devastating,” Phillips said.

Children in a classroom
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

The state of Michigan will provide more than $4 million in partial settlement of a class-action lawsuit to help school children exposed to high lead levels in Flint's drinking water.

Cynthia Canty / Michigan Radio

 


The concept of seeking sanctuary in a church is an ancient one. 

 

As the United States toughens its immigration stance though, people facing deportation are turning to churches for sanctuary. 

Courtesy of Michael Gustafson

On the first day that Michael Gustafson and his wife Hilary opened Literati Bookstore in the heart of downtown Ann Arbor, something possessed him to place a typewriter on a table for anyone to use.

That was in the spring of 2013. Since then, Gustafson’s “public typewriter experiment” has yielded a treasure trove of notes: some droll, some heartbreaking, some witty, some poignant.

aerial view of little caesars arena
Tony Brown

 


 

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio sports commentator, joined Stateside today to discuss what the Red Wings should expect in the draft lottery, what the main difference was between watching the Frozen Four and Red Wings games, and why the Pistons have "stalled."

 

bottled water
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

The state of Michigan has decided there’s no further need to distribute bottled water to people in Flint. That free bottled water program began after tests revealed extremely high levels of lead in the city’s drinking water.

But the state says lead levels in Flint haven’t exceeded government action levels for over two years, so it’s ending the water distribution program.

George Thomas / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Governor Snyder’s administration has announced that it will stop providing free water bottles to Flint residents. The state says lead levels in Flint drinking water have not exceeded government action levels for more than two years. So, it's ending the bottled water distribution program, though it says Flint residents can still receive free water filters.

Representative Dan Kildee, D-Flint, joined Stateside today to discuss how ending the water bottle program will affect the city’s residents, how Flint residents feel about the water crisis, and how trust in government can be restored in Flint.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

It’s been another day of long lines at water distribution centers in Flint. 

Cars and trucks started lining up after Governor Snyder announced last week that the state will stop providing city residents with free bottled water.

The state started handing out cases of water to city residents two years ago after tests showed elevated levels of lead in Flint’s tap water. The governor insists tests show Flint’s drinking water is now well within state and federal standards.

bonfire on beach close up
Photo by Kelly Bork on Unsplash

The Michigan Supreme Court has ruled in favor of a century-old inn in a lawsuit over hot coals on a Lake Michigan beach. The court says Watervale Inn is protected by a law that shields landowners from liability during recreational activities. The court last week reversed a decision by the Michigan appeals court. A 10-year-old girl, Bailey Noble, suffered burns while stepping on the hidden remnants of a beach bonfire in 2013.

A concealed carry weapon
aliengearholsters / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

With attention to gun control legislation at the forefront of the national conscience, the Michigan Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday over whether schools can trump state law to enact their own firearm restrictions.

Both Ann Arbor Public Schools and Clio Area School District are facing lawsuits by gun rights groups after banning weapons on school grounds in 2015 and 1996, respectively.

State law currently bans guns from weapon-free school zones; however, someone with a concealed pistol permit can enter school property with an openly holstered gun.

Michigan State Police officer at computer
Michigan State Police

Police in Michigan hope the number of unsolved missing persons will drop thanks to a new law  signed by Governor Rick Snyder recently.

The legislation requires all law enforcement agencies to put missing persons’ information into the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System – or NamUs.

Law enforcement say Michigan is ranked 3rd in the nation for most missing persons. Experts say requiring law enforcement to put case information into NamUs could help lower the state’s number of missing persons.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

This weekend Democrats will endorse a candidate for Attorney General, a candidate for Secretary of State, and candidates for State Supreme Court. Jocelyn Benson is running unopposed for Secretary of State. Three Democrats want the job of Attorney General. Below are responses (in alphabetical order of the candidates’ last name) to issues such as consumer protection, the environment, Enbridge’s Line 5 which runs under the Straits of Mackinac, and LGBTQ civil rights. 

I don’t read a lot of blogs and bloggers, partly because I don’t have the time and partly because in many cases, I know what they are going to say before they say it.

But one I do read regularly is Chad Selweski’s commentary Politically Speaking, at PoliticsCentral.org. His motto is “a country that loses its values, its principles, has lost its heart. A country that loses its sensible center, its common ground, has lost its mind.”

highway sign
Flickr user Ken Lund / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

A judge sentenced four teenagers to a program at a youth treatment center for throwing rocks and sandbags onto I-75 near downtown Toledo and killing a Michigan man.

Police say the boys were all 13 or 14 years old when they were arrested in December.

One sandbag smashed through a car windshield and hit 22-year-old Warren resident Marquise Byrd. He later died.

The boys apologized to Byrd’s relatives in juvenile court Friday, but the family called the sentence too light.

The fight for the Democratic nod for state attorney general has gotten nasty with less than a week to go before Michigan Democrats decide on a candidate.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The union representing non-tenure track faculty at the University of Michigan has postponed a two-day strike that was supposed to start Monday.

The Lecturers Employee Organization (LEO) and U of M officials spent the weekend in contract talks. The talks are scheduled to continue this week.

As designated word nerds, we here at That's What They Say whole-heartedly admit that sometimes we do things in our spare time that are a bit, well, geeky. But also pretty fascinating.

For instance, English Professor Anne Curzan has been been working on a project that traces changes in the New York Times style guide. She's been perusing stylebooks from the beginning of the 20th century to the present to see what has changed over time.


A young kid smiling, speaking with a politician in a suit
Tyler Scott

Democratic candidates for Michigan’s 11th Congressional District were cheered at a crowded town hall at a Library in Novi on Saturday for embracing gun control reform measures as a part of their campaign.

There were several of the so-called “Town Hall for Our Lives” events in Michigan, and dozens around the nation this weekend, continuing the heightened calls for gun control measures in the wake of February’s Parkland, Florida school shooting.

A box of Ice Mountain brand water bottles
Steven Depolo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has approved a permit for Nestle to increase the volume of water it pumps from its well in Osceola County from 250 gallons per minute to up to 400 gallons per minute.

More than 80,000 people spoke out against Nestle's permit request, but the MDEQ said it cannot base its decision on public opinion.

This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss potential political blow-back that could stem from the state's approval of Nestle's permit.


Daniel Howes / Detroit News

President Donald Trump’s relationship with Detroit’s auto industry is complicated. Look at the past week.

On Monday, Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency said that it would consider easing Obama-era fuel economy standards. For an industry selling more and more pickups and SUVs, that’s exactly what automakers, foreign and domestic, wanted to hear.

Saginaw County Jail

A priest in the Catholic Diocese of Saginaw has been arrested for a second time on sexual assault charges.

Father Robert Deland was arrested for the first time on Feb. 25, and charged with sexual assault of two victims, a 21-year-old man and a 17-year-old boy.

Those charges included second degree criminal sexual conduct and gross indecency.

Deland was released with a GPS tether device, and was arrested again on April 5 on four additional charges.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality approved a permit for Nestlé to increase pumping out water from 250 gallons a minute to 400 gallons at a facility in Osceola County. That approval came after overwhelming disapproval from citizens. The DEQ says it must follow the law when making permit decisions, which would seem to get rid of necessity of taking public comment.

Vicki Barnett, former Mayor of Farmington Hills and a former Democratic legislator, and Ken Sikkema, Senior Policy Fellow with Public Sector Consultants and the former Republican majority leader in state senate, joined Stateside to discuss how effective and desirable the DEQ and public comments are, how the legislature should treat water resources, and how the decision will affect the state’s farmers.

Belmont Tower at MSU
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

This week, a Michigan House inquiry about the handling of complaints over convicted sex offender and former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar completed its work. The information was turned over to the Attorney General’s office. Some of that information was released in a letter to House speaker Tom Leonard.

Andrew_Writer / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A new study by a Michigan State University researcher probes the mechanisms behind the spread of mass online harassment and fake news by looking at the 'dark patterns' underlying the technology platforms.

Lester Graham/Michigan Radio

We like to talk with people who make things we use. This time we make a stop in Jackson.

Chris Maples has been making ice fishing rods for a couple of decades. His company is called Frozen Puppy Custom Ice Rods

He designs the rod handles and hand ties everything. He makes the kind of rods that he likes, but he's open to what his customers want. Listen to his story above.

University of Wisconsin Press

Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota were rich hunting grounds for a young man in the early part of the 20th century. He wasn’t hunting game. He was in search of lumberjack songs.

Steve Chrypinski / Michigan Radio

Mental illness is an issue that “knows no class, no gender, no race, no geography,” said Joe Linstroth, executive director of Stateside and host of Wednesday night’s Issues & Ale event.

He asked the audience – a full house at Jolly Pumpkin Dexter’s brewery – to raise their hands if they have a personal connection to mental health or mental illness. Most every hand went up.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Snyder administration is ending state supported bottled water distribution in Flint.

The government started distributing bottled water to Flint residents after tests revealed extremely high levels of lead in the city’s drinking water.  

In the years since Flint’s water crisis began, thousands of city residents have made a trip to one of the government sponsored water distribution centers to pick up a free case or two of bottled water a regular chore.

Residents take the mic in new MorningSide podcast

Apr 6, 2018
Imani Mixon in front of childhood home
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

There are a few basic steps journalists take when reporting. Pick a newsworthy topic. Track down the facts. And then talk to people out in the community what they think about it.

But what if you flipped that script?

What if, instead of asking the questions, you let people in the community decide what’s worth talking about?

That’s the idea behind MorningSide 48224, a community-produced podcast from Michigan Radio and the Detroit Journalism Cooperative.

Elissa Slotkin
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Elissa Slotkin was twenty-five and in her second day of graduate school in New York City the day the planes slammed into the towers, and, her life, like so many others, was changed.

“I felt I had to do something in service to my country,” she said. That led to the Central Intelligence Agency and three tours of duty in Iraq, where she served with the soldiers and eventually married Colonel Dave Moore, an Apache helicopter pilot.

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