Allison Lyons

Allison Lyons is an intern at Michigan Radio.

For the first time in six years, Michigan has a balanced population.  An even number of people moved out of… and into… the state in 2011, according to Atlas Van Lines.

The report says Michigan is one of only three Midwest states to have a balanced population, including Iowa and South Dakota.

Ken Darga is the state demographer. He said some of the stabilization came from those left when unemployment hit its highest, and are now returning.

“People who left Michigan in previous years for economic reasons, are now able to come back now that the economy is improving,” Darga said.

Darga also attributes the balance to students who left the state for college and returned after graduation.

Inform our coverage: Have you or someone you know left the Midwest?

Some Republican state lawmakers are questioning whether each state university in Michigan needs its own board of trustees.

State Rep. Bill Rogers is sponsoring a proposal to evaluate the need for separate boards.  Rogers said  it's part of an effort to make college education less expensive and more efficient.

Mike Boulus, the executive director of the Presidents Council, State Universities of Michigan, said  having separate boards allows universities to make quick decisions.

When Rhonda Pillote’s brother-in-law received a call that his Christmas gift was incorrectly delivered across the street, he did not rush over.

Two days later he arrived to pick up the package and it was gone.

Pillote, an Ann Arbor resident, sent him  a box of scones, honey and coffee from Zingerman’s.

She says he told her the neighbor ushered him into the kitchen, and announced “Funny thing…we ate it!”

The University of Michigan student assembly wants to make it easier for gay, lesbian, transgender and bisexual students to live together. It’s part of a movement called gender neutral housing.

The student organization wants to see a gender neutral housing option on next year’s on-campus housing application. It would allow students to be contacted by the LGBT student resource center, and partnered with a roommate they feel comfortable with.

Ben Cooper / Spaceflight Now

Students at the University of Michigan got to see two satellites they built blast into space today.

Engineering Professor James Cutler said it was an exciting moment for his students to be able to watch the NASA rocket that carried the satellites fire up and launch.

"They see all their theoretical knowledge come to life," said Cutler. "They get to apply everything they’ve been learning to a real-world problem. They get to see things that are real-world and unscripted."

RAX is the name of one of the satellites. It will do atmospheric experiments and measurements for the National Science Foundation.

Noah Klugman is a junior who worked on the second satellite, called M-Cubed. It's flying a technology demonstration mission for NASA. He’ll help operate the satellite from Ann Arbor, and take pictures of Earth.

"I plan on having a lot of fun with that, and getting better with that," Klugman said. "I can’t wait for my first picture to come down."

Video of the launch was provided by NASA: