WUOMFM

Cheyna Roth

Capitol Reporter

Cheyna Roth

Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County. Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism. She got her masters at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR.

Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan. Cheyna also focuses on the Legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN.

Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker.

Ways to Connect

test with bubble answers
User Alberto G. / Creative Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan may soon be making changes to student testing. 

The state's Department of Education is considering adding  a standardized test that would go beyond what's included on the Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress (or M-STEP), which was implemented during the 2014-2015 school year. 

woman at podium
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Radio

The Michigan League for Public Policy aimed to have what it called an “honest discussion” about racial inequality in Michigan at its annual forum Monday. 

From the Flint water crisis to the state of Detroit Public Schools, the League wanted Michiganders to take a hard look at how racial inequality impacts their communities and learn about ways to make change. 

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

While Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump may have taken up most of Detroit’s attention on Saturday, another candidate was trying to shore up votes for Election Day.

Green Party candidate Dr. Jill Stein held a rally in the Eastern Marketplace with her running mate Ajamu Baraka. This was their first joint appearance since the Green Party convention in August.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is boosting his presence in Michigan. Michigan's campaign for Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is expanding from one to seven senior staffers. 

Dave Doyle is the Executive Vice President for Marketing Resource Group. He says this is a big commitment to Michigan and shows that the campaign sees Michigan as a battleground state.

 

“The important thing is the expansion of the staff,” he says. “They’ve basically gone from a one man operation to seven people. So that’s again pretty significant.”

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Michigan auto workers and labor leaders gathered Friday morning to oppose Republican nominee Donald Trump’s visit to Dimondale, Michigan later that day. The group gathered with a very clear message: Donald Trump would a “disaster” for Michigan.

Former U.S. Rep. Mark Schauer and several members of the United Auto Workers attacked Trump’s statements about moving car production outside of Michigan and his failure to release his tax returns. They said Trump is not on the side of the American workers.

According to Charley Ballard, the biggest difference between Trump and Clinton is their stance on immigration.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Millions of Americans would be put to work if Hillary Clinton is elected president. That was the promise the candidate delivered in Metro Detroit Thursday. Clinton said Republican nominee Donald Trump is presenting a dismal and incorrect picture of Michigan’s economy. She pushed pack at Trump’s economic plans while at an advanced manufacturing plant in Warren.

Pages