Emily Fox

Morning Edition Producer

Emily is the producer and fill-in host for Morning Edition. She is also a reporter and producer for Stateside.

Before working for Michigan Radio, Emily hosted and produced an award winning weekly talk show on Michigan State University's student radio station, IMPACT 89FM. Some of the feature stories she has contributed over the years at WKAR-FM, WJR-AM and Michigan Radio have been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters and the Society for Professional Journalists.

Emily holds a B.A. in music education and is currently working on her Master's in Telecommunication at MSU.

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Politics & Government
7:11 am
Tue December 4, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Mayors and local officials voice oppose changes to gun laws

"Mayors and other local officials were at the state Capitol Monday to oppose a rewrite some of Michigan’s gun laws. Specifically, they are asking the Legislature to continue to require people who buy pistols from private owners to get a state background check and a license. Background checks are already required by federal law when people buy from dealers. Law enforcement officials say the state’s licensed pistol registry helps them solve crimes and return stolen guns. But supporters of the legislation say the state makes it too difficult for people to legally buy firearms to for self defense," Rick Pluta reports.

Judge dismisses lawsuit over Asian Carp

A federal judge in Chicago dismissed a lawsuit Monday filed by five Great Lake states over threats posed by Asian carp. The states want barriers placed in Chicago-area waterways to prevent Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes. The Detroit Free Press reports,

"U.S. District Judge John Tharp said he couldn’t order the agencies to do what the states want because federal law requires the corps to keep shipping channels open between Lake Michigan and one of the Chicago waterways -- the Des Plaines River -- and prohibits constructing dams in any navigable waterway without Congress’ consent."

GOP want right-to-work legislation before year's end

GOP lawmakers on Monday focused their efforts to pass right-to-work legislation before the year's end. The Detroit News reports,

"The chamber is pushing for the legislation in response to Indiana becoming a right-to-work state in February and Michigan voters' defeat last month of the union-backed Proposition 2. The initiative aimed to enshrine collective bargaining rights in the Michigan Constitution in an attempt to block a right-to-work law. . . Right-to-work laws seek to ban "union security" clauses in collective bargaining agreements that require employees who don't want to join a union to pay an agency fee — sometimes up to 95 percent of monthly union dues — or be subject to termination by the employer."

Environment & Science
9:49 am
Mon December 3, 2012

A 1,000 mile hike to protect the Great Lakes

NASA Goddard Photo and Video flickr

Seeking Change interview

This week on Seeking Change, Christina Shockley spoke with Loreen Niewenhuis. She's a Michigan author who hiked 1,000 miles to parts of all the Great Lakes.  She wanted to learn how this water that surrounds our state-- and defines our state-- works. She also wanted to learn about the concerning points for the lakes.  She'll write about this experience as well, in a book out early next year.

Politics & Government
7:29 am
Mon December 3, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Bill would ease restrictions for concealed pistol permits

"The state House is considering a bill that would remove a state background check requirement for  concealed pistol permits. The bill would eliminate state background checks for people who want to carry concealed pistols.  The bill would also eliminate a data base of Michigan's pistol owners, which State Police say is used to help solve crimes. If the bill passes, it would also put county sheriffs in control of the permit process, rather than county boards," Rina Miller reports.

Legislation would allow insurance companies to deny medical marijuana coverage

"Bills in the state House would let insurance companies deny coverage for medical marijuana. Employers could also refuse to reimburse medical marijuana expenses through workers compensation. Opponents of the bills say the policy would keep some patients from receiving proper and legal medical treatment. But some medical marijuana advocates support the measures. They say when Michigan voters approved the drug, they never meant to force insurers to cover it. The state Senate voted overwhelmingly to pass the bills in May," Jake Neher reports.

Bill would allow medical personnel to refuse care on religious grounds

"A bill before the state senate would allow medical personnel to refuse care based on their religious beliefs. The bill would also protect them against civil, criminal, and administrative liability. However, the bill would require medical personnel to provide medical care in an emergency, regardless of a conflict with their religious beliefs," Chris Zollars reports.

Politics & Government
6:57 am
Fri November 30, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

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State-run health exchange rejected in House

Action on a state-run exchange for people to shop for health coverage was rejected in the state House Thursday. As the Lansing State Journal reports,

"Gov. Rick Snyder prefers a state-run program, but his administration this month applied for a federal grant as a first step toward the fallback position of teaming with the federal department. States have the option of creating their own exchange, teaming up with the federal government or having a federal system. . . Some Democrats opposed the legislation because it was linked to bills that would prohibit qualified health plans offered through a state exchange from providing coverage for elective abortion but would allow people to buy optional supplemental coverage for elective abortion outside the exchange."

Bills move forward to make gray wolf a game species

The Michigan Senate has approved a bill that would designate the gray wolf as a game species. The bill gives the Natural Resources Commission authority to decide whether to establish wolf hunting seasons. As the Detroit Free Press reports,

"The wolves were removed from the endangered species list in January, but only the DNR is allowed to manage the wolf population, which has begun to encroach upon U.P. towns, according to residents. The animals also are having a big impact on the U.P.'s deer population, killing between 17,000 and 29,000 deer every year, according to a report from the DNR."

State threatens to sue Troy over special election

"The state is threatening to sue the city of Troy over plans for a special election to replace recalled Mayor Janice Daniels. The Michigan Department of Elections says state law requires an election in February. Troy officials want to wait until next November. The state sent a letter to city leaders giving them until 1pm Friday to comply with the directive, and avoid litigation," Chris Zollars reports.

Politics & Government
7:16 am
Thu November 29, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Snyder pushes renewable energy and drilling for natural gas

Governor Rick Snyder gave a special address on energy and the environment Wednesday. Highlights of his address include a push for more renewable energy and more drilling for natural gas. As the Lansing State Journal reports,

"The Republican governor gave natural gas a central role in an energy policy that seeks greater efficiency and improvements to infrastructure such as pipelines and the electric transmission grid. It proposes establishing a “strategic natural gas reserve” designed to make the resource more affordable and defends the practice of hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” to extract gas from deep underground."

GOP pushing for right-to-work in lame duck

Republicans are still working to make Michigan a right-to-work state. This comes after voters rejected a ballot proposal to enshrine collective bargaining in the state constitution. As the Detroit News reports,

"Today could be the last chance to introduce a bill making union membership optional as a condition of employment in the private and public sectors to get it passed by Dec. 13. That's the day legislative leaders hope to head home for the holidays."

Sorry Michigan, no one won the Powerball jackpot in the state

"The Michigan Lottery says two Powerball tickets worth $1 million each were sold in the state. Officials say the tickets were sold at a liquor store in Kentwood and a CVS pharmacy in Dearborn. The Michigan tickets matched five numbers drawn last night, but not the Powerball number. Powerball officials said early Thursday that tickets sold in Arizona and Missouri matched all six numbers to win the $579.9 million jackpot," the AP repots.

Politics & Government
7:57 am
Wed November 28, 2012

The week in Michigan politics

cncphotos flickr

The week in Michigan politics for 11/28/12

This week Christina Shockley and Jack Lessenberry talked about what legislation is likely to pass before the end of the year, the cash crisis in Detroit, and mass transit in southeast Michigan.

Politics & Government
7:40 am
Wed November 28, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Snyder wants to phase out property tax

Governor Rick Snyder and Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley want the Legislature to enact a major tax overhaul before the end of the year. It would phase out Michigan’s tax on business and industrial equipment.

As the Detroit Free Press reports,

"The state's plan is to get rid of the tax on business equipment, furniture and supplies that brought in more than $1.2 billion in 2010, the most recent figures available, over the next 10 years. . . The phase out of the tax would begin in 2014 for small businesses and in 2016 for larger manufacturers. There would be no reimbursement to communities where personal property tax revenues are less than 2.5% of their total taxable value."

Southeast Michigan transit authority passes in Senate

Legislation to create a regional transit authority for southeast Michigan won approval from the state Senate Tuesday. As the Detroit Free Press reports,

"The goal, backed strongly by Gov. Rick Snyder and Detroit Mayor Dave Bing, is a network of speedy, modern buses operated independently of Detroit Department of Transportation and the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transit. The plan is to give the transit authority the power to coordinate routes between the rapid-transit system and the existing city and suburban bus lines to eliminate duplication of routes. DDOT and SMART would instead feed into the faster bus lines, freeing up both to provide better, more efficient local service."

Ex-aids to former Detroit Congressman enter pleas in petition fraud

"A former top aide to a Detroit-area congressman has pleaded no contest to forgery in an election scandal involving bogus petition signatures. Don Yowchuang was deputy district director to then-U.S. Rep. Thaddeus McCotter, a Republican from Livonia. Yowchuang admits making copies of petition signatures to try to qualify McCotter for the August primary election. Separately, McCotter former district director Paul Seewald pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor, falsely signing a nominating petition as a circulator. McCotter didn't make the ballot and quit Congress in July," the AP reports.


Politics & Government
8:30 am
Wed November 21, 2012

The week in Michigan politics

cncphtos flickr

Interview

It's a busy news week in Michigan politics. This week Kyle Norris and Jack Lessenberry discuss various proposals and happenings in Lansing:

1. Michigan Supreme Court Justice Diane Hathaway faces allegations of fraud in a federal civil lawsuit. It accuses Hathaway and her husband of hiding assets to qualify for a short sale on a $1.5 million dollar home in Florida.

2. A proposed bill that would allow people to claim a 12-week-old fetus as a dependent for tax exceptions.

3. Another proposed bill would bring massive overhaul of Michigan's school funding system. Jack discusses some of the major changes.

Politics & Government
6:32 am
Wed November 21, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Feds accuse Supreme Court Justice of fraud

"Michigan Supreme Court Justice Diane Hathaway faces a federal civil lawsuit. It accuses Hathaway and her husband of hiding assets to qualify for a short sale on a $1.5 million home. Hathaway and her attorney have also tried to tamp down rumors that she is about to resign from the state’s highest court. Sources inside the Michigan Hall of Justice say Hathaway has cleared out her personal belongings from the state Supreme Court offices in Lansing. Hathaway sent an e-mail to her fellow justices saying she is not stepping down," Rick Pluta reports.

U of M doctor involved in insider trading scheme

"A University of Michigan doctor is at the center of what's possibly the most lucrative insider trading scheme ever. Sidney Gilman is an Alzheimer's expert. He's also a paid consultant for a hedge fund investing in Alzheimer's drugs. The Department of Justice alleges Gilman gave the hedge fund secret information: namely, that a major drug test by the company Elan was getting bad results. At a press conference, the F-B-I's April Brooks says Gilman and the hedge fund investor, knew sharing that information was illegal," Kate Wells reports.

Bill would allow a 12-week-old fetus to be claimed as dependent

State lawmakers are considering legislation that would let parents claim a fetus as a dependent on their tax returns. As Mlive reports,

"Michigan lawmakers may consider allowing a fetus of at least 12 weeks to qualify as a dependent for state income tax purposes -- a move that if put into law might be the first of its kind in the nation. . . A representative of the Michigan Family Forum, which supports the bill, said it could translate to a $160 savings that could be used for prenatal care or other purposes. But critics called the measure divisive and said it appeared to be a move to lay the groundwork to fight against abortions."

Politics & Government
6:59 am
Tue November 20, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Schuette says Blues overhaul not enough to protect seniors

State Attourney General says the overhaul of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan needs more safeguards in order to protect seniors. The Detroit news reports,

Under legislation sought by Gov. Rick Snyder, the Blues could dramatically reduce its $200 million annual subsidy of the Medicare supplemental insurance by 2016, when a rate freeze Schuette negotiated expires.

After that, the Blues would contribute as little as $15 million annually to a new state-run nonprofit health care foundation for Medigap coverage made available only to Medicare recipients who prove a financial need, Schuette said.

Blue Cross says 70 percent of the 210,000 seniors receiving Medigap insurance would fail a means test to show a financial need for the subsidy, Michigan Insurance Commissioner Kevin Clinton said.

Benton Harbor considers eliminating police force to cut costs

"Two weeks after voters in Benton Harbor rejected a millage renewal, the city’s emergency financial manager is laying out a few grim options. Joe Harris told reporters Monday afternoon one option is eliminating the police force. The millage would’ve raised a little more than a million dollars this year alone. That represents twenty-percent of Benton Harbor’s yearly revenue," Lindsey Smith reports.

University of Maryland added to "Big Ten"

"The Big Ten athletic conference added the University of Maryland to its roster Monday. Rutgers University is expected to announce its plans to join the conference today. That will bring the total number of schools in the conference to 14, and is likely to mean big increases in revenues for the universities as well as the conference," Chris Zollars reports.

Health
8:46 am
Mon November 19, 2012

Michigan hunters feed the hungry

Ron Abfalter flickr

Interview

This week on Seeking Change, Christina Shockley spoke with Dean Hall. He is the president of Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger. The group donates it's game venison to soup kitchens and food pantries across the state. He says, "We can use the benefit of deer management to people that need the help sorely."

Politics & Government
7:56 am
Mon November 19, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Proposed changes to K-12 education

There's a proposed bill being drafted that could make some major changes to K-12 education in Michigan. As the Detroit Free Press reports, highlights of the bill include, "[the ability for] students to choose school districts, make greater use of online learning and earn financial incentives of $2,500 per semester for completing high school early."

Charter school enrollment rises in Michigan

"Charter schools are becoming a more common choice for Michigan students. A new report finds five Michigan cities are now among the top 20 in the nation for the percentage students in charter schools. Detroit is No. 2 -- with 41 percent of its students enrolled in charter schools. Flint ranks fourth and Grand Rapids is ninth. Lansing and Traverse City are 19th and 20th,' Rina Miller reports.

Local government leaders want Michigan's personal property tax changed

"A new poll shows local government leaders in Michigan are leery of proposals to do away with Michigan’s personal property tax. Republican state lawmakers want to repeal or greatly change the tax, possibly before the end of this year. Businesses complain the personal property tax is cumbersome and discourages investment.  Legislation repealing the personal property tax already passed in the state Senate, but the legislation has sat in state House since last Spring," Steve Carmody reports.

Politics & Government
11:17 am
Wed November 14, 2012

The week in Michigan politics

cncphotos flickr

Interview

This week Christina Shockley and Jack Lessenberry discuss the chance of Michigan Congressman Mike Rogers taking over David Petreaus' position as director of the Central Intelligence Agency, what would happen if Michigan misses the Friday deadline to create a statewide online exchange for people to shop for health insurance and how Detroit's finances could affect the rest of the state.

Politics & Government
7:32 am
Wed November 14, 2012

In this morning's headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

In health news. . .

Officials with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan say the state Legislature must pass bills to overhaul the health insurer by the end of the year. Under the measures, Blue Cross would become a customer-owned non-profit, and would have to pay state and local taxes. The Lansing State Journal reports,

Even though it would lose its tax-exempt status, Blue Cross says the change in classification — and the lower government regulation that goes with it — is essential for it to be able to compete with other insurers under the Affordable Care Act.Under federal law, Blue Cross must have its products and rates ready by March for an online health exchange where people can compare and buy their own insurance plans, but the organization won’t make it because of the way it’s currently regulated by the state.

Meanwhile, as Rick Pluta reports, "Michigan is unlikely to meet a Friday deadline to tell the Obama administration if it will create a statewide online exchange for people to shop for health insurance. The alternative is for Michigan to become part of a federally managed exchange."

Tribe asks federal court to dismiss lawsuit to block Lansing casino

"A federal judge is being asked to dismiss a lawsuit aimed at stopping plans for a casino in downtown Lansing. The Sault Sainte Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians delivered its response this week to the lawsuit filed by Michigan’s Attorney General in September.  The lawsuit claims the casino project violates federal law as well as a gaming compact between the state and the tribe. The tribe says that’s not true. The tribe wants to resolve this legal challenge before asking the federal government to take the land around Lansing’s convention center into trust.   The land must fall into trust…before the tribe can begin construction of its casino," Steve Carmody reports.

Politics & Government
7:07 am
Tue November 13, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Blue Cross overhaul on the "lame duck" agenda

"Lawmakers in Lansing say they want to tackle some high-profile bills before this session wraps up at the end of the year. The state House is set to hold its first hearing Tuesday on a proposed overhaul of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. The measure would turn the state’s largest health insurer into a customer-owned non-profit, and end its tax-exempt status. Nothing is certain, but other items on the “lame duck” agenda could include a repeal of the personal property tax on businesses, legislation to fund roads projects, and a bill to replace the emergency manager law that voters rejected in last week’s election," Jake Neher reports.

Michigan Congressman Mike Rogers possible choice to head up CIA

"Media reports suggest Michigan congressman Mike Rogers could be on a short list of candidates to be the next director of the Central Intelligence Agency. David Petraeus’ abrupt resignation last week opened up the CIA director’s job. Multiple media outlets including the New York Times say Rogers is among those being considered to fill the post. Washington observers say Rogers, a Republican, could speed through the confirmation process. Rogers has been the chairman of the House permanent select committee on Intelligence since January of 2011. Rogers has not commented on the speculation," Steve Carmody reports.

New international bridge could be up and running in 5 years

"Governor Snyder's office and top Canadian officials are getting more information out about a proposed bridge between Detroit and Windsor. Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley and the Canadian Consul General spoke to a group in Grand Rapids about the bridge deal Monday. Calley says trucks could be crossing a new bridge as soon as 2017. Right now the bridge is awaiting permits from the US government," Lindsey Smith reports.

Health
7:58 am
Mon November 12, 2012

Retaining safety in Detroit with neighborhood patrols

Credit User: ktpupp / flickr

Interview

Many cities across the state are cutting back, and police and fire department budgets are often on the chopping block. In some cases, citizens have taken safety matters into their own hands, through neighborhood patrols. The aim is to observe what's going on in the community, and call the police if anything usual is noted.

Coach Muhammad is president of the community patrol of the Grandmont neighborhood, in northwest Detroit. He volunteers 40 hours a week to keep his neighborhood safe.

As part of Michigan Radio's Seeking Change series. Muhammad talks with Morning Edition host Christina Shockley about what his patrol has been able to do for his neighborhood.

Read more
Politics & Government
7:41 am
Mon November 12, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

Credit User: Brother O'Mara / flickr

Democrats want to revamp voting procedures and make Secretary of State an appointed position

"There's a move in the Michigan Senate to change the Secretary of State's office to a non-political position and to revamp the state's voting procedures. Gretchen Whitmer is the Senate minority leader. She says many Michigan voters waited for hours to cast their ballots while Secretary of State Ruth Johnson was campaigning for Mitt Romney. A spokeswoman for Ruth Johnson says the Secretary of State was not campaigning for Romney on Election Day, but was working with local election officials. Whitmer says Senate Democrats are working on legislation that would allow early voting and no-reason absentee voting to help reduce long lines at the polls. She says they're also drafting a bill that would make the Secretary of State an appointed position, rather than an elected post," Rina Miller reports.
 

Bill would help horse racing industry

"A bill to help Michigan’s struggling horse racing industry is on its way to the state Senate. The legislation would allow people to bet on races dating back years. Players would place bets on a machine, and a randomly selected race would be shown on a video screen. The state House passed the bill last week with bi-partisan support," Jake Neher reports.

Competition for GM in China

"Two domestic Chinese car companies are teaming up.  The move could help them compete against General Motors in China - and perhaps even hasten the day when Americans can buy Chinese-made cars. Gwanjoe and Chery plan to collaborate to cut costs. That should help them compete against GM and Volkswagen - the two biggest car companies operating in China. Michael Dunne is the author of "American Wheels, Chinese Roads." He says the collaboration could help the two inside China, and boost exports to developing countries. But he figures a Chinese car company won't try to enter the tough U.S. market for at least five years," Tracy Samilton reports.

Politics & Government
8:17 am
Wed November 7, 2012

The week in Michigan politics

Credit cncphotos / flickr

Interview

We have a special "Week in Michigan politics."

Morning Edition host Christina Shockley talks with political analyst Jack Lessenberry about the election results.

They talk about Obama's victory in the state, who won the Congressional races, how voters rejected all ballot proposals and much more.

Politics & Government
6:35 am
Wed November 7, 2012

Election in review

Credit User: Serfs UP ! / flickr

Presidential Race

President Obama won the state of Michigan and the nation

U.S. Senate

Democrat Debbie Stabenow was easily re-elected, defeating  former GOP Congressman Pete Hoekstra

U.S. House

1st District- Republican Dan Benishek leads Gary McDowell; results not final

11th District- Republican Kerry Bentivolio wins

14th District -- Democrat Gary Peters re-elected in newly drawn district

Ballot proposals

Proposal 1: Emergency Manager Law Referendum: REJECTED

Proposal 2: Collective Bargaining: REJECTED

Proposal 3: Renewable Electricity Standard: REJECTED

Proposal 4: Home Health Care Workers: REJECTED

Proposal 5: Tax Hike Supermajority: REJECTED

Proposal 6: The Bridge Vote: REJECTED

Politics & Government
6:48 am
Tue November 6, 2012

In this morning's Michigan news headlines. . .

Credit User: Brother O'Mara / flickr

5 things to know on Election Day

"With all the confusion over voting this year, here are five things you need to know before you go to the polls:

1. You will be asked to show a photo ID, but you can still vote without one - you'll just need to sign a document verifying your identify.

2. You should not see a box on your ballot application asking you to attest that you're a U-S citizen.

3. It's a long ballot, so save yourself some time and do your research.

4. You can bring a cheat sheet, or notes about different issues. Just don't display it in a way that could be seen as campaigning.

5. Even if you're voting a straight ticket, don't forget about the non-partisan issues, like Supreme Court races," Kate Wells reports.

Gov. Snyder criticizes ballot proposal process 

"Governor Rick Snyder says he’d like to see some changes in the rules for putting questions on future election ballots. The governor says he’d specifically like to see limits on paying petition circulators for each signature they collect. Ballot campaigns spent at least $9.6 million this year to pay professional petition circulators. The governor says he’d also like to see some controls to make sure petition circulators don’t mis-represent what’s in a proposal," Rick Pluta reports.

Detroiters waited nearly 3 hours to vote absentee

"Many voters in Detroit looking to avoid long lines at the polls today, waited nearly 3 hours when they went to cast absentee ballots a day early yesterday. Michigan does not technically offer early voting, like some states do. But people can vote absentee if they provide a reason they won't be able to vote in-person on Election Day. Detroit voters face 18 proposals on the ballot, including questions from the city, the county and the state," Sarah Hulett reports.

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