Emily Fox

Host/Producer/Reporter

Emily is the producer and fill-in host for Morning Edition. She is also a reporter and producer for Stateside.

Before working for Michigan Radio, Emily hosted and produced an award winning weekly talk show on Michigan State University's student radio station, IMPACT 89FM. Some of the feature stories she has contributed over the years at WKAR-FM, WJR-AM and Michigan Radio have been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters and the Society for Professional Journalists.

Emily holds a B.A. in music education and an M.A. in telecommunication from MSU. For her Master's thesis project, she produced an audio documentary about migrant workers in Michigan that aired on Michigan Radio.

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Snyder likely to veto handgun bill

"Governor Snyder has indicated he will likely veto a bill that would change the state's gun sales law. The bill would eliminate a state background check requirement for sales made over the Internet or at gun shows. Those account for close to half of all gun sales," Sarah Hulett reports.

House speaker Bolger criticized for his company's tax history

"State House Speaker Jase Bolger is facing harsh criticism about his business record from a liberal advocacy group. Progress Michigan released documents alleging Bolger’s company, Summit Credit Service, failed to pay more than $100,000 in taxes and fees between 1997 and 2000. The papers include liens from the Michigan Treasury Department, the state Unemployment Agency, and the IRS," Jake Neher reports.

Striking Detroit workers suspended and face firing

Thirty-four striking Detroit employees of the water and sewage department who went on strike this week have been suspended and face firing. It's illegal in Michigan for municipal workers to strike. Sarah Cwiek reports that, "City officials plan to largely privatize the water department over five years, and cut up to 80-percent of its staff."

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"Four strike" felons now face at least 25 years

"Felons convicted of four or more violent offenses will face at least 25 years in prison under a law signed by Governor Rick Snyder. There are 47 offenses covered by the new “four strikes” law. They include kidnapping and rape, as well as armed robbery, home invasion, and weapons violations," Rick Pluta reports. 

Concussion bill headed to Snyder's desk

"Youth sports coaches may soon have to take players out of games if they suspect a concussion. The state Legislature easily passed two bills designed to cut down on serious head injuries in kids' sports. The measures would also require the state to provide more information and training for coaches, players, and parents," Jake Neher reports.

Detroit workers on strike for second day

"Striking employees at Detroit’s wastewater plant walked the picket line for a second day yesterday. That’s despite a federal judge’s order to return to work. Most members of AFSCME Local 207 walked off the job Sunday. Union members say they’re fed up with what they call a continued effort to dismantle the department and their union. City officials plan to largely privatize the water department over five years, and cut up to 80-percent of its staff," Sarah Cwiek reports.

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As part of Michigan Radio's Seeking Change series, Morning Edition host Christina Shockley talked with the founder of En Garde Detroit. It's a program teaches the sport of fencing to kids ages 8-16.

Founder Bobby Smith said getting kids involved in non-traditional sports can help them break the cycle of poverty and gain access to college. 

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Welfare benefits lost if children miss more than 10 days of school

"A new policy goes into effect Monday that takes away welfare benefits from families with children who miss more than 10 days of school without an excuse. The policy requires families that apply or re-apply for cash assistance to prove their children don’t have too many unexcused absences," Rick Pluta reports.

Liquor license bill passes state House

"The state house has approved a bill that would let Michigan businesses get a liquor license more quickly. The review process often takes months and in some cases, years. The proposed law would allow a conditional liquor license while a review is under way," Rina Miller reports.

Law would allow STD treatment of partners without exam

"A bill in the state House would let doctors prescribe medication to the partner of a patient who's been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease -- without examining the partner. The law would apply to chlamydia and gonorrhea. More than 50,000 cases of chlamydia and more than 13,000 cases of gonorrhea were reported in Michigan in 2011. Both are highly infectious and can cause serious damage to a woman's reproductive system," Rina Miller reports.

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Schuette cautious about Blue Cross-Blue Shield overhaul

"Hearings continue at the state Capitol on the future of Blue Cross-Blue Shield of Michigan. Attorney General Bill Schuette showed up to urge a cautious approach to overhauling the state’s largest health insurer. The attorney general would give up a considerable amount of oversight under the plan proposed by Governor Rick Snyder. It would convert Blue Cross from a tax-exempt charity to a member-owned not-for-profit company. Bill Schuette says he wants Blue Cross and its assets audited to make sure this is a fair deal for Michiganders. Schuette says he’s not out to stop the changes. Governor Snyder and Blue Cross executives want the switch done by the end of the year. They say the changes are needed because the new federal health care law will change the mission of the Blues," Rick Pluta reports.

More on the EM saga

The debate over emergency managers and emergency financial managers has been heating up. The Michigan Supreme Court last month ruled a union-backed referendum to repeal the law could go on the ballot. "The leader of the Michigan Senate says he and fellow Republican colleagues are armed with a proposal to replace the state law that lets emergency managers take over local governments in case voters strike it down in November. Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville told The Associated Press yesterday that a draft is under legal review. The behind-the-scenes effort aims to keep a form of the contentious law on the books. Richardville says it acknowledges some concerns by critics, who say it takes too much power from local leaders struggling with budget deficits," the AP reports.

Trying to uncover death of former Teamsters boss

The Department of Environment Equality work to uncover the death of a former Teamsters boss.  "Soil samples will be taken from beneath a Detroit-area driveway in the search for the body of former Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa. The Department of Environmental Equality plans to start its work this morning in Roseville. Authorities are investigating a man's claim that he saw a body buried under the driveway 35 years ago," the AP reports.

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Snyder against handgun bill

"Governor Rick Snyder says he won’t support new legislation to make it easier to buy handguns. The package of bills would no longer force people to license handguns before purchasing or carrying them. It would also get rid of a registry keeping track of handgun owners with criminal backgrounds. The Governor says he’s concerned it would make it too easy for the wrong people to buy handguns. His office says he’s working with bill sponsors to work through those concerns, but he doesn’t support the legislation in its current form. Critics of the proposal say there should be background checks on people who buy firearms gun shows, over the internet, or from private individuals. They say those account for nearly half of all guns purchased in the state. Representative Paul Opsommer is sponsoring the legislation. He told the Capitol news service Gongwer this week 44 other states have similar bills on the books, and haven’t seen any major problems as a result," Jake Neher reports.

Democrats say GOP have been violating Michigan Constitution

"Democrats are taking their challenge to how state House Republicans rule the chamber to the Michigan Supreme Court. They say the GOP majority has been violating the Michigan Constitution by refusing to count the votes on a procedural motion that determines when laws take effect. The motion requires two-thirds super-majorities. But many laws have been allowed to become effective right away on voice votes that are not counted or recorded. Lower courts have said the judicial branch should not tell the Legislature how to conduct its business. Republicans say the lawsuit is just pre-election politics," Rick Pluta reports.

State House hear proposals on transit in southeast Michigan

"A State House panel will hear pitches for better regional transit coordination in southeast Michigan Thursday. A proposed regional transit authority for the region has support from Governor Snyder, many business leaders, and transit advocates. But the proposal has languished in the state legislature. Federal transportation officials have indicated they’re willing to put lots of money into Metro Detroit’s transit system. But they’ve been clear that won’t happen without a governing authority to run it," Sarah Cwiek reports.

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