Jennifer Guerra

Reporter/Producer

Jennifer is a reporter for Michigan Radio's State of Opportunity project, which looks at kids from low-income families and what it takes to get them ahead. She previously covered arts and culture for the station, and was one of the lead reporters on the award-winning education series Rebuilding Detroit Schools. Prior to working at Michigan Radio, Jennifer lived in New York where she was a producer at WFUV, an NPR station in the Bronx.

Her stories and documentaries have won numerous regional and national awards, and her work has aired on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Marketplace and Studio 360.

Jennifer graduated from the University of Michigan and received her M.A. in broadcast journalism from Fordham University. When she's not on the radio, she and her husband are making up lyrics to songs and singing them to their adorable baby girl.  

Pages

Arts/Culture
6:00 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Students take to the stage to tell the story of Flint arsons

UM-Flint students interviewed more than 50 residents about the arson fires.
Photo courtesy of the Project's facebook page

Students in Flint have written a new play inspired by the string of arson fires that plagued the city last year.

Students at the University of Michigan-Flint spent a good part of the this year interviewing victims of the arson fires that ripped through the city in 2010. The students then transcribed the interviews and strung them together to create a new play called EMBERS: The Flint Fires Verbatim Theatre Project.

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Arts/Culture
4:08 pm
Thu August 11, 2011

New "Be Me" project champions black men in Detroit, Philadelphia

A new initiative in Detroit focuses on the role black men and teens play in the city’s revival.

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Arts/Culture
5:45 pm
Wed August 10, 2011

Sphinx founder Aaron Dworkin to serve on National Council of the Arts

Aaron Dworkin is President Obama's first confirmed appointment to the National Council on the Arts
Bruce Giffin Courtesy of the Sphinx Organization

Aaron Dworkin, founder of  the Detroit-based Sphinx Organization, was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve on the National Council on the Arts. Dworkin is President Obama's first appointment to the Council.

The National Council on the Arts advises the Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, currently Rocco Landsman, about policies and programs.

Dworkin founded the Sphinx Organization in 1996 with the goal of "building diversity in classical music."

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Arts/Culture
3:37 pm
Wed August 10, 2011

Detroit native Philip Levine named U.S. Poet Laureate

Philip Levine will start his poet laureate duties with a reading of his work at the Coolidge Auditorium on Monday, Oct. 17.
Frances Levine Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Detroit native Philip Levine is the country’s new poet laureate.

Levine was born in Detroit in 1928. As a student, he worked a number of jobs at Detroit’s auto plants, and he translated his experience into poetry. His poems depict life in Detroit and the working class in general.

"What Work Is" - introduction and reading by Philip Levine

"They Feed They Lion" - introduction and reading by Philip Levine

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Arts/Culture
12:38 pm
Tue August 9, 2011

Ypsilanti studio space "spurs" on artists, musicians

James Marks, SPUR Studios founder, in front of the building on Railroad Street in Ypsilanti
Doug Aikenhead Michigan Radio Picture Project

You can file this story under "silver lining."

Michigan's recession has left a lot of empty buildings in its wake. When James Marks was looking for a larger building to house his t-shirt and flat screen printing company, VG Kids, he looked at a two-story brick building on Railroad Street in Ypsilanti.

The building had plenty of space, but was divided into dozens of small rooms. Marks says the space wasn't a good fit for his company, but it was perfect for artists’ studios:

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Auto/Economy
3:02 pm
Mon August 8, 2011

Personal finance: When friends, family and finances mix

Should you lend money to friends and family?
user penywise morguefile

The current credit crunch has made it harder for people to get loans from a bank. Gone are the days when you could walk into your local bank branch, flash your credit score and walk out with a loan. So many are turning to their friends and family for help...but is that a good idea?

To lend, or not to lend

When Pete and Michelle Baker wanted to buy a new house, they needed money for a down payment. Their down payment was tied up in their old house, which they hadn't sold yet.

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Education
6:00 am
Mon August 8, 2011

Oakland University opens new medical school

Michigan faces a physician shortage by 2020
user clarita morguefile

Classes start today at the new, privately funded Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine in southeast Michigan. It's the first of three new medical schools expected to come online in the next few years.

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Education
10:11 am
Fri August 5, 2011

Snyder appoints 11 board members to oversee new education system

The authority board will oversee the state's new Education Achievement System.
user jdurham morguefile

Governor Snyder has appointed eleven people to oversee the state’s Education Achievement System. That’s the system designed to turnaround the state’s worst schools – starting with Detroit.

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Arts/Culture
3:28 pm
Wed August 3, 2011

Artpod: From the "extraordinary to the seemingly mundane" - an audio tour of the Stearns Collection

One of the many shelves inside the Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

The Cincinnati Art Museum recently discovered it had a long lost treasure trove of rare instruments in its possession. More than 800 antique instruments just sitting in storage…unused and pretty much forgotten.

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Arts/Culture
5:53 pm
Tue August 2, 2011

U of M houses more than 2,400 rare and contemporary instruments

Recent additions to the Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

The Cincinnati Art Museum last week discovered it had a long lost treasure trove of rare instruments in its possession. We're talking more than 800 antique instruments just sitting in storage, unused and pretty much forgotten.

Well it turns out the University of Michigan has three times as many historical instruments housed mostly off campus in a high-security vault.  

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Arts/Culture
12:12 pm
Thu July 28, 2011

Upscale Somerset CityLoft, indie 71 Pop set up shop in Detroit

Inside the Somerset CityLoft in midtown Detroit
Photo courtesy of the Somerset Collection

Retail stores are literally popping up around Detroit this weekend.

You use to have to drive about 30 minutes outside of Detroit if you wanted to shop at the tony, upscale Somerset Collection in Troy. But now you can browse the shelves of Neiman Marcus and Saks Fifth Avenue in midtown Detroit. It’s part of a new pop up mall of sorts called “Somerset CityLoft."

The retail space will be open for one weekend a month, starting today through Saturday, July 30. (Thursday and Friday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.).

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Economy
6:29 pm
Wed July 27, 2011

Whole Foods to open in Detroit in 2013

Fresh vegetables and fruit
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

Whole Foods is coming to Detroit.

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Arts/Culture
12:56 pm
Wed July 27, 2011

Artpod: An interview with Bonnie Jo Campbell

Bonnie Jo Campbell
Photo courtesy of the author

This week's Artpod features an interview from the "Michigan on the Page." It's a web-only series from Michigan Radio, where authors from around the state are interviewed about their own books, about Michigan books in general, and about what it means to be a Michigan writer.

On today's podcast, we turn the mic over to Brian Short, the series' curator, and author Bonnie Jo Campbell.

Campbell's most recent book is the novel Once Upon a River, which has gotten rave reviews. Her previous book, American Salvage, was a finalist for the National Book Award.

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Auto/Economy
5:06 pm
Mon July 25, 2011

16,000 employees offered cash incentives to move to Detroit

Five Detroit businesses hope to entice their employees to move downtown by offering them cash incentives.
user Bernt Rostad flickr

Several Detroit businesses are paying their employees to move to the city as part of a new incentive program called "Live Downtown."

Employees can get $20,000 dollars toward the purchase of a new home. Those who rent will get up to $3,500 for two years. Even employees who already live in the city can get money to make home improvements.

Here's a list of the 5 companies behind the new "Live Downtown" program:

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Arts/Culture
4:00 pm
Sun July 24, 2011

New reality series to focus on Muslims in Dearborn

TLC's "All-American Muslims" debuts in November
user ppdigital morguefile

A new reality show will focus on five Muslim families in Dearborn.

Filming is already underway for the new reality show “All-American Muslims.” The show will debut in November on TLC, the channel behind other reality shows like "Sister Wives" and "Kate Plus 8."

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Arts/Culture
4:35 pm
Fri July 22, 2011

Here comes the bride...down the football field!

Wedding ceremony on the 50 yard line at the Big House in Ann Arbor
Ray Anthony Photography

The University of Michigan football stadium is cashing in on the ever-growing wedding industry.

The Big House is now available for weddings.

Couples can pay $6,000 to get ready in the home and visitor locker rooms, and then head to the field for an hour-long ceremony.

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Arts/Culture
5:50 pm
Thu July 21, 2011

Artpod: Flint, public art, and revitalization

The Genesse Towers were lit up for one night only as part of The Flint Public Art Project
Photo courtesy of Stephen Zacks

Flint is in the spotlight on today's Artpod.

We talk a lot about Detroit’s path to revival, but drive an hour northwest to Flint and you’ll find a city whose struggles are similar if not worse than Detroit's.  Now a coalition of artists, city officials and residents is trying to re-write Flint's story through art.

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Economy
5:11 pm
Thu July 21, 2011

Lemonade economics

The recession has taken its toll on the neighborhood lemonade stand.
Amelia Carpenter Michigan Radio

(Here's a version of the story that aired on Michigan Radio.)

Turns out even lemonade stands aren’t immune to Michigan’s economic recession.

Molly and Lucy Prochaska have been in the lemonade business for the past five years. They sell lemonade, iced tea, and Arnold Palmers (50 cents for a small cup, $1.00 for a large.)  They also sell popsicles at fifty cents a piece, which is a new addition this year.

They’ve got a cash register, lots of signage. They're also located close to downtown, so there's a good amount of foot traffic from the Ann Arbor Art Fairs.

But 12-year old Molly says business just isn’t what it used to be:

MOLLY PROCHASKA: The first year was really nice, we got lots of money. But after that, when the economy started to go down we didn’t get as much money.

JENNIFER GUERRA: You think it had to do with the economy?

MOLLY PROCHASKA: Probably. People didn’t want to spend as much. They wanted to save their money.

The girls made around $200 their first year. Molly is saving up her lemonade money to buy a camera; Lucy wants to buy an iPad.

But it's not all doom and gloom at the lemonade stand. Molly says business this year is picking up a bit. She says that could mean one of two things: the economy's picking up, or more people are coming because it's "super hot out."

Also, side note, it looks like Molly and Lucy might have to step up their game now that a new lemonade stand popped up a block away. Not only is the new stand charging less for a cup, but they also use fresh lemons.

Politics
11:54 am
Thu July 21, 2011

Teacher tenure law requires new "evaluation tool" for educators

Gov Snyder will appoint a commission to come up with a tool to measure teacher performance.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

The new teacher tenure law that Governor Snyder signed this week makes it easier for school districts to fire teachers in classrooms where students are struggling.  As Rick Pluta reports, the law "eliminates discipline and layoff rules as a subject of collective bargaining with teachers unions."

The devil is in the details

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Auto/Economy
4:40 pm
Tue July 19, 2011

Median household incomes in Michigan are shrinking

Michigan's median household income dropped over the past decade.
Photo by penywise morgueFile

The median income for Michigan households has dropped by more than $9,000 over the past decade. Only one other state, Hawaii, has seen a bigger loss in income.

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