Lindsey Smith

West Michigan Reporter/Producer

Lindsey Smith is Michigan Radio's West Michigan Reporter. Lindsey has worked as a reporter at radio stations in both West and Southeast Michigan, and her work has been recognized by both the Michigan Association of Broadcasters and Michigan AP. She's a graduate of Eastern Michigan University and Specs Howard School of Media Arts.

Q&A

What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter?
Reporting from a hot air balloon was one of the scariest. Trying to bubble-wrap my recording equipment to come with me down a giant waterslide took the most preparation and ingenuity. Mostly I remember people; so many downtrodden, truthful, funny, inspiring, regular-everyday people. Nearly everyone I meet and talk to shapes how I view life in at least the slightest way.

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio?
"Wait Wait, Don't Tell Me." It's hilarious. "On the Media" is a very, very close second.

What do you like best about working in public radio?
Mostly, I'm proud of what we do and the stories we produce.

What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The internet! What did anyone do without it! I mean, I remember life without it, but it's amazing how much I rely on it every day.

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
It depends on the season. I love wakeboarding in the summer, hanging out on the beach, going on long walks with my dog Lola, grilling. In the winter I wish I could hibernate. I do enjoy snowboarding and movies and warm drinks indoors then.

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
If I told you, it wouldn't be a surprise!

Pages

Education
6:01 pm
Mon September 19, 2011

Campaign to pass school millage in Grand Rapids kicks off today

Grand Rapids School board trustee Jon O'Conor (left) and resident Michael Tuffelmire talk about the campaign following a press conference this afternoon.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

A group of parents and school leaders in Grand Rapids is kicking off a campaign to pass a property tax increase to pay for improvements at more than 30 school buildings.

The proposed increase would cost an owner of a home worth $100,000, $54.20 a year. It would pay to replace worn-out roofs, heating systems, and windows. It would also pay to get rid of asbestos and replace old fire alarms.

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Arts/Culture
1:34 pm
Fri September 16, 2011

Contract allows GR Symphony “to focus on making music”

Grand Rapids Symphony Music Director David Lockington
Grand Rapids Symphony

The Grand Rapids Symphony has reached a labor agreement with its 80 musicians. The deal comes after several months of intense contract negotiations. 

“Someone counted that we had 29 meetings during the summer,” said Peter Kjome, Grand Rapids Symphony President and CEO.

“It was not an easy time at the negotiating table but we stayed there together, we rolled up our sleeves, we reached agreement and now we’re able to focus on making music.”

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Politics
4:00 pm
Thu September 15, 2011

How would you fix the federal budget deficit?

Congressman Fred Upton (R-St. Joseph) reviews federal spending at a public meeting last month. The 'super comittee's' webpage was not up and running at that time. Now he's looking for ideas.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Congressman Fred Upton is looking for your ideas on how to reduce the federal budget deficit.

Upton is one of twelve lawmakers selected to serve on a special Congressional committee that will try to come up with a compromise on long-term spending.

Seven of the twelve lawmakers on the special committee will have to agree on a proposal in order to get it to the full Congress for approval. Last month, Upton called it “an enormous task.”

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Education
1:41 pm
Wed September 14, 2011

Grand Rapids superintendent passed over for another job

Bernard Taylor has led Grand Rapids schools for 5 years.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Broward County Public Schools selected Robert Runcie, not Bernard Taylor, as their next superintendent.

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Science/Medicine
12:58 pm
Wed September 14, 2011

Snyder unveils health care goals for citizens, state government

Gov. Rick Snyder weighs in 192 pounds today at his press conference in Grand Rapids. He tells the crowd he wants to lose 10 pounds by the end of the year.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder wants people in Michigan to do more to promote their own health. He also outlined policies he’d like to see legislators pass to help lower health care costs and improve access.

Snyder says he wants Michigan to create a health care exchange: a place where individuals can compare health care insurance.

The new federal health care law mandates states create their own exchange, join a regional one or wait until the federal exchange is in place.

“Having the idea of having an exchange done right is a good idea and my view is Michigan should establish one. We shouldn’t wait and say the federal government is going tell us it’s their exchange.”

Snyder wants to reform the state’s health code, improve health care for veterans and children with autism. He also wants to reduce regulations on health care professionals.

Politics
11:29 pm
Tue September 13, 2011

GOP candidates for U.S. senate try to stand out in crowd of six

Republican candidates hoping to unseat U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow in 2012 held an unofficial debate in West Michigan this week. The Gerald R. Ford Republican Women’s Club hosted the event. The “Ford Women” of the club aren’t set on which man will make the best candidate.

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Environment
11:38 am
Tue September 13, 2011

Michigan cities take a tree census

People sit in the shade of trees at Rosa Parks Circle in downtown Grand Rapids. The city values the 61,000 trees within its boundaries at $71 million.
Photo by Lindsey Smith

Grand Rapids, Adrian and Ann Arbor are taking part in a tree study that could help other Michigan cities assess their own urban forests. The goal is to make a tree assessment more accurate and affordable for cities.

Grand Rapids spent tens of thousands of dollars to find more information about the city’s trees. They came away with valuable information like how much greenhouse gases and water runoff the trees absorb. But city owned trees make up only a tiny portion of the overall urban forest in Grand Rapids.

Tyler Stevenson is the city forester. He says they discovered more than half of Grand Rapids’ trees are maples.

“Is that true for the entire community? We don’t know. And it’d be interesting information and it would also help to increase the awareness of the public on how valuable the trees on their property are.”

Federal officials will use the data from the study to enhance existing software. Other communities in Michigan will be able to use that software for free to calculate data about their own trees.

film incentives
5:29 pm
Mon September 12, 2011

Charges in film studio case dismissed

Michigan’s attorney general is considering an appeal in a case against two men involved in a project to convert an old GM plant located in Walker into a film studio.

Joe Peters and Jack Buchanan Jr. tried to get $10 million in state film incentives for a big studio project. But the film office rejected their application and the deal fell through. They got no taxpayer money.

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Education
6:03 am
Mon September 12, 2011

Grand Rapids schools leader finalist for job in Florida

Grand Rapids Public Schools Superintendent Bernard Taylor, a day after his resignation was announced in July 2011.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Bernard Taylor agreed to resign from Grand Rapids schools at the end of this school year. That agreement came after he was a finalist for other jobs beginning last spring. He didn’t get any of those jobs.

Now he’s looking to head Broward County Public Schools – the sixth biggest district in the U.S.

Taylor will attend a public forum in Broward County Tuesday evening. The school board is likely to make its choice Wednesday morning. He’s one of five finalists for the position.

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Science/Medicine
3:27 pm
Wed September 7, 2011

Foundation grants $4.5 million to program preventing infant deaths

Infant mortality is much higher among African-Americans than whites, even when considering risk factors like smoking, poverty and education.
Sono Tamaki Creative Commons

A program that’s showing signs of progress in reducing low birth weight and infant deaths among African-Americans is getting a major vote of confidence. The W. K. Kellogg Foundation has awarded a $4.5 million grant to a program in Grand Rapids called Strong Beginnings.

The program has reduced the number of black infant deaths in Grand Rapids by more than 20 percent in five years. 

Peggy Vander Meulen is executive director of Strong Beginnings.

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Agriculture
11:02 pm
Tue September 6, 2011

Michigan apple growers expecting a great crop this year

Apples from an orchard in Ottawa County.
dailyinvention creative commons

Not only will there be way more Michigan apples this year, they’ll probably be bigger and better looking too.

According to estimates from the United States Department of Agriculture, Michigan apple growers are likely to produce 26.1 million bushels this season. The 5 year average is 19.5 million bushels. Only Washington and New York state grow more.

Denise Donohue is the Executive Director of the Michigan Apple Committee.

“This is the 5th year on the rollercoaster for Michigan. It’s been an up and down thing for the last three years in particular.”

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Arts/Culture
4:55 pm
Fri September 2, 2011

Countdown to third annual ArtPrize begins

ArtPrize Executive Director Catherine Creamer shows off the ArtPrize totebag. The bag is one of at least 50 different pieces of ArtPrize swag available for purchase.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Organizers and artists are working hard to get everything done in time for opening day later this month.

The winner of the art competition gets $250,000 in prize money. Organizers claim it’s the world’s largest art prize.

People who visit Grand Rapids during the event determine the winner through online voting.

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corrections
6:03 am
Fri September 2, 2011

Postcard only rule at Muskegon County jail revised, a little bit

Protestors lined up in front of the Muskegon County jail several times this year to protest the posdcard only policy.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

In February the sheriff instituted a “postcard only” rule at the county jail. That meant inmates could only send or receive mail on standard postcards. The sheriff was trying to keep drugs, pornography, and items inmates could use as weapons – out of the jail. Legal paperwork is exempt. Now the sheriff is allowing inmates to send letters. But incoming mail still has to be written on standard postcards.

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Auto/Economy
7:00 pm
Thu September 1, 2011

New Black Chamber of Commerce forms in Grand Rapids

New chambers of commerce are starting to form in cities across Michigan to support African-American business leaders. The Michigan Black Chamber of Commerce is working to charter local black chambers in several cities. The group wants to empower African-American business leaders to overcome unique challenges, like historically bad access to capital.

Leaders of the newly-formed Grand Rapids Black Chamber of Commerce are hoping to empower African-American business owners.

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Environment
11:38 am
Tue August 30, 2011

Simple business model connects chefs to locally grown food

At the meet-up, Barbara Jenness shares some new cheese from her Dancing Goat Creamery.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Michigan farmers grow the most diverse crops of any state besides California. Agriculture is Michigan’s 2nd largest industry and it’s growing. But many Michigan farms aren’t big enough to distribute through grocery stores.

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Offbeat
6:00 pm
Fri August 26, 2011

Runners take to the streets on naked feet in Grand Rapids

Man runs barefoot in the Los Angeles Marathon.
J Rosenfeld Creative Commons

The Naked Foot 5-K run is this Sunday. Runners are encouraged to wear no shoes or very minimal shoes.

Barefoot running has been catching on because of potential health benefits. Barefoot runners tend to land on the front of their feet, not their heels. The lower impact of the landing tends to minimize injuries. There other hazards to look out for though, like rocks or glass.

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Auto/Economy
3:33 pm
Thu August 25, 2011

Business incubator in Muskegon celebrating success story

SVL engineer Matt Pinter (left) speaking with MAREC director Arn Boezaart (middle) and MAREC manager Doug Huesdash (right).
Amanda Pitts Grand Valley State University

An entrepreneur in Muskegon has outgrown the business incubator where his company began.

Smart Vision Lights reopened at its new location this week after more than three years at the incubator. The company develops LED lighting systems for manufacturing companies who want to take quality control photos.

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health care
5:14 pm
Tue August 23, 2011

Doctors, hospitals and schools promote low-cost health care plans

Billboards that look like this will begin to pop up in Michigan. The grops are also buying TV and radio ads.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

An alliance of medical and educational associations is working to get more children signed up for free or low-cost health insurance programs.

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Economy
5:09 pm
Mon August 22, 2011

Michigan farmers talk about the future of agriculture industry

Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) speaks with Jim May inside his barn in Sparta Monday afternoon.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Senator Debbie Stabenow visited a farm in West Michigan Monday to discuss how to expand the agriculture industry.

Stabenow is chairwoman the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry.

“We all have a stake in our farmers doing well because we all have a stake in having food security, in making sure we have wholesome, American grown, Michigan grown food for us.”

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Investigative
6:00 am
Mon August 22, 2011

“Postcard only” rules at county jails in Michigan attracting protests, lawsuits

Postcard sized protest sign in Muskegon last April aims to demonstrate the policy's limitations.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Mail policies at several county jails across the state are becoming more restrictive, mainly to save money. It’s causing an outcry from inmates’ family and friends, and people who advocate for prisoners’ rights.

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