Lindsey Smith

West Michigan Reporter/Producer

Lindsey Smith is Michigan Radio's West Michigan Reporter. Lindsey has worked as a reporter at radio stations in both West and Southeast Michigan, and her work has been recognized by both the Michigan Association of Broadcasters and Michigan AP. She's a graduate of Eastern Michigan University and Specs Howard School of Media Arts.

Q&A

What has been your most memorable experience as a reporter?
Reporting from a hot air balloon was one of the scariest. Trying to bubble-wrap my recording equipment to come with me down a giant waterslide took the most preparation and ingenuity. Mostly I remember people; so many downtrodden, truthful, funny, inspiring, regular-everyday people. Nearly everyone I meet and talk to shapes how I view life in at least the slightest way.

What is your favorite program on Michigan Radio?
"Wait Wait, Don't Tell Me." It's hilarious. "On the Media" is a very, very close second.

What do you like best about working in public radio?
Mostly, I'm proud of what we do and the stories we produce.

What modern convenience would it be most difficult for you to live without?
The internet! What did anyone do without it! I mean, I remember life without it, but it's amazing how much I rely on it every day.

What is your favorite way to spend your free time?
It depends on the season. I love wakeboarding in the summer, hanging out on the beach, going on long walks with my dog Lola, grilling. In the winter I wish I could hibernate. I do enjoy snowboarding and movies and warm drinks indoors then.

What are people usually very surprised to learn about you?
If I told you, it wouldn't be a surprise!

Pages

Education
6:36 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Snyder gets praise for efforts to put more money into early childhood education

The preschoolers gave Snyder a book they made.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

This week, Governor Rick Snyder made good on his promise to boost preschool spending.

Today he got a chance to talk to some parents, teachers and school administrators in Grand Rapids about the proposal.

About a dozen four-year-olds sat in a circle around Gov. Snyder. He read them "Snowmen at Work," a children’s tale about what snowmen do for a living.

“Are they in school just like you?” Snyder asked the group. 

"Yeah!” they replied in unison.

“You have fun at school?"

"Yeah!”

Read more
Health
4:39 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

Philanthropists get Swedish scientist to move heart regeneration research to Grand Rapids

Dr. Stefan Jovinge, left, chats with Dick DeVos, who contributed toward the effort to bring Jovinge's research to Grand Rapids.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States.

David Van Andel, the chairman and CEO of the Van Andel Institute, says it's teaming up with Spectrum Health to try to do something about it.

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Politics & Government
6:20 am
Wed February 5, 2014

With $2.3 million state loan, Benton Harbor emergency manager prepares an exit

Benton Harbor City Hall pictured in the summer of 2011.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Benton Harbor’s emergency manager is planning his exit. That’s after the state agreed to loan the city more than $2 million.

When Benton Harbor officially began its financial emergency, Jennifer Granholm was the governor. During the last four years, the city has operated under three different versions of Michigan’s emergency manager law. That’s how long it’s been.

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Weather
4:00 pm
Sun February 2, 2014

Where to pile all that record snowfall from January? DEQ weighs in

Snow piles up in a commercial parking lot in Grandville in January 2009.
Rachel Kramer Creative Commons

It was a snowy January in Michigan; the snowiest on record for Flint and Detroit, according the the National Weather Service.

“We’ve had our fair share too, that’s for sure,” said Jared Sanders, assistant district supervisor of the Kalamazoo district’s water resources division. The division is a part of Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality.

I can vouch for it; huge piles of plowed snow are filling up the parking lots of many businesses here in Grand Rapids too.

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Energy
5:39 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

Palisades Nuclear Plant proposes new design for historically problematic mechanisms

The control rod drive mechanisms are a part of the nuclear reactor, which is inside the circular building on the left.
Mark Savage Entergy Nuclear Operations

The Palisades power plant is proposing a new design that officials hope will help end a recurring problem.

The heat generated by its nuclear reactor is restrained in part by 45 control rods. The rod mechanisms at Palisades have an uncommon design (one of only two plants in the country) and have had a lot more problems than at other plants.

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The Environment Report
10:16 am
Thu January 30, 2014

The case of the mysterious rocks and signs related to the Kalamazoo River oil spill

Craig Ritter's mysterious rock formations he started finding this summer on the banks of the Kalamazoo River.
Craig Ritter

In case you’re new in town, three and a half years ago an Enbridge pipeline broke, causing a huge oil spill near Marshall, Michigan.

The case of the mystery rocks

A couple of years ago, I met Craig Ritter while doing some reporting on the river cleanup.

He’s your typical, passionate, Michigan out-of-doors type.

He says he was out fishing last summer.

“I started noticing these weird formations that I’d never seen before,” Ritter said.

Read more
The Environment Report
7:00 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Two stories of Michigan solar power ambitions

Jim Wolter, right, and Ed Brandel of Energy Partners LLC in Muskegon.
Courtesy Photo

First up, a Michigan man who’s trying to win millions of dollars with solar power.

He’s trying to put solar panels on as many Michigan homes and businesses as he possibly can.

Prasad Gullapalli’s Novi-based Srinergy wants you to invest in solar panels – for your home, for your business – doesn’t matter. He’s looking for anybody in Michigan to go solar.

He’s making the offer with no upfront costs.

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Environment & Science
10:46 am
Mon January 27, 2014

White Lake could become Michigan’s first to come off U.S-Canada list of pollution hot spots

White Lake is the larger lake pictured. It lies north of Muskegon, Michigan.
Doc Searls Creative Commons

An inland lake north of Muskegon is expected to reach a major milestone this year. Officials anticipate White Lake will be removed from a list of the most-polluted places surrounding the Great Lakes this year.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, most of the pollution in White Lake was caused by a chemical company that dumped waste into the water.

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Transportation
6:00 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Grand Rapids airport faces 'unprecedented' influx of snowy owls

USDA wildlife specialist Aaron Bowden shows the length of this snowy owl’s wingspan. The owl was caught at Gerald R. Ford International Airport this week. It was tagged and released 50 miles away.
Courtesy photo Gerald R. Ford International Airport

Snowy owls have been flocking to Gerald R. Ford International Airport in Grand Rapids this winter.

“It’s unprecedented. We have three to four times the activity than we’ve ever had in the past,” said Tara Hernandez, a spokeswoman for the Ford Airport.

Airport staff had to shoot nine owls this season. That’s compared to only four in the past four years combined.

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Education
6:07 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Survey shows more Michigan public schools privatizing support services

A Dean Transportation bus in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
Steven Depolo Creative Commons

Two in every three Michigan public school districts contract out at least one major service, like custodial, transportation or food service. That’s according to a yearly survey of districts.

The Midland-based research institute Mackinac Center for Public Policy, which supports privatizing services, has published the survey every year since 2003. Here’s a summary of the center’s survey:

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Environment & Science
6:00 am
Tue January 21, 2014

First meeting on U.S. Army Corps’ plans for Asian carp is tonight in Ann Arbor

DNR fishery technician Vince Balcer holds up one of the "common carp" already found in many rivers in Michigan. The DNR held a practice drill in September 2013 to test their carp catching skills, just in case bighead or silver carp make it here.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

This week federal officials will talk about the options for preventing Asian carp from reaching Lake Michigan.

People and organizations will get a chance to have their say about which option they support. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will host meetings in Ann Arbor on Tuesday night and in Traverse City on Thursday.

The meetings are two of six scheduled this month, from Louisiana to Pennsylvania. Officials will also take written comments through early March.

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Education
12:07 pm
Sun January 19, 2014

Lawmakers, educators work toward compromise on bills that would flunk some 3rd graders

Students who can't read proficiently by third grade would be held back under new legislation.
Mehan Creative Commons

Lawmakers are working out the details of a proposal that would flunk Michigan students who can’t read at “proficient” levels by the end of the third grade.

Many in the education community are opposed to the legislation, including The Michigan Association of School Boards, Michigan Association of School Administrators, the American Federation of Teachers.

The Michigan Association of Public School Academies supports it.

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Environment & Science
11:21 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

After “uncommon” incident, regulators keeping a close eye on Enbridge Energy pipeline installation

A federal regulator keeps a close eye on work going on behind Dave Gallagher's house Wednesday afternoon.
Dave Gallagher Courtesy photo

Federal regulators are overseeing the installation of an oil pipeline after an accident last week near Ceresco.

It’s hard for Dave Gallagher not to watch the work. The pipeline is going in just 12 feet behind his house.

“Yeah they’re really scrutinizing that pipe now. There’s like 10 people down there,” Gallagher said, watching from his back porch Wednesday afternoon.

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Law
12:30 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

Ex-head of Grand Rapids-based chairmaker sues another furniture company after chair breaks

U.S. Furniture's catalog photo of the model of chair that Miller claims broke and caused his injuries.
U.S. Furniture Inc.

The founder of a Michigan chair company is suing another furniture company after falling out of a chair and hurting his back.

David Miller, former president of Grand Rapids Chair Company, filed a lawsuit this week against Wisconsin-based retailer Menard’s and California-based manufacturer U.S. Furniture Inc.

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Law
7:26 am
Tue January 14, 2014

Abortion rights advocates won’t attempt repeal of Right to Life-backed insurance rider law

Rick Pluta Michigan Public Radio

A coalition of abortion rights advocates will not try to immediately repeal a Right to Life-backed state law that requires women to buy a separate health insurance rider to cover abortions.

“Our efforts and our resources are better spent on a broad strategy to address this growing frustration that is about more than just one issue in one discrete moment in time, but about the larger impact of politicians using women as target practice,” said Rana Elmir, Deputy Director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan.

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Education
10:40 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Grand Rapids schools want to hear what’s working, what’s not in ‘listening tour’

Students at Creston High School talk about the closure of their school at the first 'listening tour' in 2012.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

The head of Michigan’s fifth-largest school district is launching a “listening tour” this week.

Superintendent Teresa Weatherall Neal says the Grand Rapids school district needs to succeed in order for the city to succeed, and because that impacts the entire region, she wants to hear from everybody.

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Economy
10:05 am
Mon January 13, 2014

2013 record year for food bank that serves West Michigan, Upper Peninsula

Food is distributed in Newberry in November 2013.
Courtesy photo Feeding America West Michigan Food Bank

The food bank that supplies food pantries in 40 Michigan counties had a record year.

Last year Feeding America West Michigan Food Bank got more food donations and distributed more food than ever. More than 25 million pounds went to food pantries in West Michigan and the Upper Peninsula.

The food bank’s CEO Ken Estelle says demand is up. Unlike during the recession, he says most people looking for free food these days are employed.

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Health
6:35 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Some Michigan hospitals change visitor policy in face of 'dramatic increase' of flu

Some Michigan hospitals are restricting visitors to help prevent the spread of the flu virus.
midiman Creative Commons

An increase of cases of the flu in Michigan is prompting some hospitals to limit who can visit sick patients. They hope it’ll help prevent the spread of the flu.

University of Michigan’s hospitals aren’t letting kids younger than 12 visit the most vulnerable patients.

At Borgess Medical Center in Kalamazoo, there are similar restrictions, along with the number of visitors, or in some units, only immediate family members.

Dr. David Davenport is the medical director of  infection prevention and control at Borgess.

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Environment & Science
2:06 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Reporter's Notebook: Take Sierra Club’s bad report card on Gov. Snyder with a grain of salt

Lindsey Smith

Sometimes people don’t tell the truth. More often, they don’t tell the whole truth. Sometimes they do it on purpose to make their argument appear stronger. Other times they make honest mistakes. Sorting it out is my job as a reporter. Yesterday, the Sierra Club dumped a fair amount of work on my lap when it released an error laden press release giving Governor Snyder a failing grade on energy and environmental actions.

Here’s what I found that I think you should know.

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Environment & Science
8:00 am
Wed January 8, 2014

State regulators to issue permit for controversial development in duneland, with conditions

The DEQ will require a land easement to minimize impacts to the unique interdunal wetland ecosystems on the property. This is the property just south of the proposed development.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

A controversial development that’s proposed on 300 acres of critical duneland in Saugatuck is likely to get the state permit it needs to get the project rolling. The parcel has been at the center of a years-long legal battle.

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