Michigan Radio Newsroom

News and Production Staff

Michigan Radio offers internships in its newsroom and production departments. Check our employment page for current openings.

Newsroom

Julia Field

Julia recently graduated from the University of Michigan with a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology and Urban Studies. Having spent the last two summers interning for a Detroit nonprofit and a NGO in India, she decided to dabble in online news journalism. As a university student, she was involved in the student organization, Human Rights Through Education and the Detroit Partnership.  Although she was raised in rural West Michigan, much of her time at the university was spent either in Detroit or studying it. She is interested in urban planning and policy, community redevelopment, and public health issues. After her internship this summer, she leaves for the Dominican Republic as a Peace Corps volunteer.

Rebecca Guerriero

Rebecca Guerriero is a senior at the University of Michigan studying in the Program in the Environment (Environmental Science). She is a Graham Sustainability Scholar and focuses her studies on water resource management and sustainable city growth and development. Rebecca is from Northville, Michigan and loves everything “Pure Michigan” – it is her dream to visit every Great Lakes lighthouse. Rebecca is writing her Senior Honors Thesis on sustainable golf course design and management. She works at NOAA’s Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments Center as a research assistant and webmaster and as a summer orientation Peer Academic Advisor for the Honors Program. She enjoys coffee, camping, traveling, the Italian language, the West Wing, and a good stack of books. Her perfect idea of happiness is playing pond hockey with the 1980 Olympic Team. After graduation, Rebecca plans to trek across Canada and watch the entire Lord of the Rings trilogy in one sitting for the first time.

Lindsay Hall

Lindsay Hall is a senior studying Political Science and Psychology at the University of Michigan. She was born in Cape Town, South Africa and moved with her family to Ann Arbor when at five years old. Last winter term Lindsay was fortunate enough to return to South Africa to study at the University of Cape Town and pursue interests in early childhood education and development as a mentor at a local primary school. She is excited for the opportunity to join the Michigan Radio team this semester and experience what it is like to work within the field of communications.

Alana Holland

Alana Holland is finishing  double major degrees in Broadcasting and Journalism from Grand Valley State University before she takes over the reporting world. Even though she's from the small-town Gaylord, Michigan, she has a heart for big cities and loves travel. In her college, Alana is an anchor and reporter for the student-run TV news station, GV Today, was Layout and Design Editor for the newspaper, the Lanthorn, and has interned for Wood TV-8 and Thunder 94.5 radio. Alana spent a summer studying theater in London, her first taste at travel and learning about culture firsthand. Her goal is to work in international journalism, hoping to eventually become the next Christiane Amanpour. She is a self admitted coffee addict, fashion fanatic, vegetarian, photographer, and lover of all things British. In the next ten years she hopes to ride Asian elephants in India, publish a book, attend a New York Fashion Week, hike Machu Picchu, and learn cook. Ultimately though, she enjoys hearing and telling people's stories, and hopes to have what she does with her work improve other people’s lives.

Sarah Kerson

Sarah is an Ann Arbor native and a graduate of Community High School, where she was an editor of its online student newspaper. She spent her freshman year of college at the University of Vermont studying the social sciences and worked as an investigative reporter for UVM's student newspaper. Sarah also enjoys writing poetry, and was a finalist in the 2012 Ann Arbor Youth Poetry Slam. She is excited to expand her journalism and media experience to public radio.

Melanie Kruvelis

Melanie is a rising senior at the University of Michigan, studying Political Science. A Michigan native, Melanie serves as the Editorial Page Editor at The Michigan Daily, managing a staff of more than 40 columnists, bloggers and editorial board members during the school year. Last winter, Melanie spent five months in Madrid, taking classes at a local university and traveling as much as humanly possible on the weekends. She enjoys all things 90s, ukuleles, and the oxford comma.

Lucy Perkins

Lucy is from Suttons Bay, Michigan and is a senior at the University of Michigan, studying English and Communications. She has worked as an Arts writer for The Michigan Daily, as a writing workshop facilitator for the Prison Creative Arts Project, and as an editorial intern at Traverse Magazine. Last year, Lucy spent five months in Buenos Aires, Argentina taking classes and squeezing in weekend travels whenever possible. While in Buenos Aires, she interned for an English newspaper, The Argentina Independent. Lucy is interested in print and radio, and wants to tell real stories, especially about people who may not otherwise have a voice. She enjoys reading, eating barbecue pizza, and playing with puppies.

Dr. Nishant Sekaran

Nishant has been a Clinical Lecturer at the University of Michigan Medical School, and is a staff physician at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. He has an M.D. degree from Vanderbilt University, and an M.Science in Health Related Research from the University of Michigan. Among his peer reviewed publications are “Hot unstable angina—is it worse than subacute unstable angina?” You can schedule an office visit with Dr. Sekaran to get the answer to that question. 

Chris Zollars

Chris is your basic born again journalist.  He reawakened his enthusiasm for radio news after years in the corporate sector writing and producing video and interactive marketing and training projects.  He holds a Masters in Journalism from the University of Illinois and a Bachelor of Science in Mass Communications from Southern Illinois University.  Chris started his journalism travels at his town’s daily paper as a teenager and during his undergrad also worked at SIU-Edwardsville’s NPR affiliate (WSIE-FM).   Chris then served five years as a commissioned officer in the US Coast Guard and was Managing Editor/Internal Relations Manager during the first Gulf War.  While in graduate school, he worked in the newsroom at WDWS-AM/WHMS-FM in Champaign, Illinois, and at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications specializing in science/technology stories.  He and his wife live up near Fenton with their 2 dogs, 2 birds, and 7 horses.

State of Opportunity

Kimberly Springer

Kimberly is excited to be back in public radio after several years spent teaching at the university and researching level in the US and abroad in London. She is currently a student in UM's School of Information Master of Science program specializing in social computing and archives/records management. Kimberly’s goal is to work in social media and/or digital archives and curation. To that end, she spends most of her spare time "curating" her Spotify collection, waiting for Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead to come back, and planning for zombie apocalypse. Ask her: she has a plan.

Stateside

Austin Davis

Austin Davis is a sophomore at the University of Michigan pursuing a degree in German Language and Communications Studies. He grew up not too far away from Ann Arbor in Rochester Hills, Michigan where his family still resides.  Although he is unsure of his future career path, he hopes to do work in global reporting/journalism and multi-media production. Although this is Austin’s first time working in a radio station, he has previous experience writing for an online publication and working on local political campaigns. He has thoroughly enjoyed his time here at Michigan Radio, and is excited for the further prospects of this internship.

Operations

Chrissy Zamaron

Crissy is the Operations Intern at Michigan Radio and a senior at U of M earning her BA in both English Language and Literature and Spanish Language and Culture. She has a passion for the art of storytelling and is a genuine NPR fanatic. After graduating this May, she hopes to stay in the public radio family by gaining a position at any one of her favorite NPR shows. Outside of her internship, Crissy loves Latin dancing, singing and endless hours of television crime dramas.

Pages

Sports
9:55 am
Sat February 15, 2014

Michigan hoping to lure in anglers with free fishing weekend

Community groups and parks throughout the state are holding family-friendly events with equipment to rent or borrow.
DNR

This weekend, state wildlife officials want people to go fish.

Today and tomorrow, people can fish in Michigan's lakes and streams without a license.

The Department of Natural Resources hopes the free fishing weekends will introduce newcomers, visitors and folks with rusty skills to one of Michigan's most popular sports.

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Environment & Science
4:30 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Judge allows cancer lawsuit against Whirlpool to move forward

City building in Clyde, Ohio
City of Clyde

A federal judge in Ohio is allowing a cancer lawsuit against the Whirlpool Corporation to go ahead.

After documenting a high incidence of childhood cancer around the company's Clyde, OH plant, several families filed suit, accusing the Benton Harbor company of polluting the air and water. Clyde is about 50 miles from Michigan.

Whirlpool asked that the case be dismissed for lack of proof.

Attorney Chuck Boyk represents the families. He says the ruling will force Whirlpool to reveal what chemicals they use at the plant.

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Politics & Government
1:14 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

State Board of Education opposes snow-day bill

A new bill may change how schools make up lost instruction time due to snow days.
user echsunderscore Flickr

The State Board of Education is recommending Michigan public school districts add additional days, not additional hours, to the school year to make up for this year’s snow days.

Last year, Gov. Rick Snyder signed a bill allowing districts exceeding the state's snow day limit to add hours to class time instead of extra days.

But the law only applied for the 2012-2013 school year.

Now legislators in Lansing are trying to extend that option indefinitely with House Bill 5285.

State Rep. Phil Potvin, R-Cadillac, a sponsor of the bill, says districts who choose to make up for lost instruction time will have to add a minimum of 30 minutes to the school day.

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Politics & Government
7:30 am
Thu February 13, 2014

In this morning's headlines: Health care, juveniles, roads

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

More Michiganders signing up for health care than expected

"About 112,000 Michigan residents chose a private insurance plan under the federal health care law through January, outpacing what was projected in a government memo last summer," the Associated Press reports.

Juvenile lifer sentencing rules head to the governor's desk

"Michigan lawmakers have given final approval to new sentencing rules after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down mandatory life imprisonment for juveniles. The bills now head to Gov. Rick Snyder for his signature. The legislation applies to future cases and not retroactively to more than 350 Michigan inmates under 18 when they committed crimes," the Associated Press reports.

Lowest amount of money spent on roads in the U.S.: Michigan

"Michigan spends less money per capita on our roads and bridges than any other state in the nation. We spent just $154 dollars per person, according to the 2010 Census," Michigan Radio reports.

Transportation
7:00 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Michigan ranks last of all 50 states on per capita road spending

Credit Morguefile

Michigan spends less money per capita on its roads and bridges than any other state in the nation.

It spends $154 per person annually, according to the 2010 Census. 

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Transportation
2:25 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Michigan residents with disabilities hit hard by polar vortex

Credit Morguefile

Michigan's record snowfalls and cold are inconvenient for everyone, but they are especially difficult for people with disabilities.

The snow and ice still on Michigan sidewalks can trap people with disabilities at home or even put them in danger. Just getting to work or to a doctor's appointment can be daunting.

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Education
1:34 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

EMU is laying off 10 of its 11 full-time lecturers in the College of Education

Eastern Michigan University
user krossbow Flickr

The College of Education at Eastern Michigan University is laying off the majority of its full-time lecturers because of falling enrollment. 

That's according to the Ann Arbor News:

The school has issued layoff notices to 10 of its 11 full-time lecturers, effective in August, according to members of lecturers union. (EMU officials say they issued notices to eight lecturers.) Lecturers, many of whom have held their jobs for several years, are upset by the changes and say the layoffs are unnecessary.

Jann Joseph, EMU's dean of education, says the opposite is true.

"We looked at the data. We looked at the enrollment patterns, and we were not convinced that we would have enough teaching loads and classes for all the people who were currently lecturers," she said. "We are just managing at a time of decline."

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Arts & Culture
10:17 am
Tue February 11, 2014

What does your winter look like on Instagram?

Clearing a pond for ice skating in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Mark Brush Michigan Radio

What does your winter look like?

Bonfires, snowsuits, and a ton of really spicy food to keep warm? Maybe it's something less picturesque, like wearing long underwear and four pairs of socks. 

We are asking listeners across the country (and around the world) to show us what winter looks like.

Michigan Radio is joining Southern California Public Radio (@KPCC on Instagram) and NPR (@NPR) as a contributing member station to the Public Square project. Check out previous themes for the project here

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Education
4:43 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Students to hold all-night event to discuss race on UM campus

University of Michigan students hold a demonstration on campus.
Adam Glanzman

University of Michigan students are holding an all-night event later this month to discuss race on campus.

The event, billed as a "Speak Out," is being organized by the United Coalition for Racial Justice, a student organization consisting of students and faculty members.

The event will build on momentum gained by the university's Black Student Union to make the campus more inclusive and diverse.

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Politics & Government
7:38 am
Mon February 10, 2014

In this morning's headlines: Minimum wage, Belle Isle, Saginaw schools

Morning News Roundup, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011
User: Brother O'Mara Flickr

Group files petition today to bump minimum wage to $9.50

"The campaign to raise Michigan’s minimum wage has settled on a target of $9.50 an hour. The group expects to file its petition language later today with state elections officials," Rick Pluta reports.

Belle Isle becomes a state park

Detroit's Belle Isle park becomes Michigan's newest state park today.

"The state is taking over the city-owned park under a lease deal with Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr. [The move is] expected to save the bankrupt city between $4 million and $6 million a year," the Associated Press reports.

Saginaw school board continues to negotiate deficit elimination plan

"Saginaw school board members will try again tomorrow to hash out a deficit elimination plan. Last week school board members met three times to discuss a plan to trim the district’s multi-million dollar deficit. The plan included layoffs and school closings," Steve Carmody reports.

That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun February 9, 2014

Fun words for 2014 Winter Olympics

The acronym YOLO has gotten a new lease on life with the "YOLO flip."

This week on That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan reveal words to know for the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.   

YOLO, an acronym that means “you only live once,” was popularized in 2011. Now the acronym has taken on a new meaning with the YOLO flip, a snowboarding term for the “cab double cork 1440.”

Swiss snowboarder Iouri Podladtchikov, also known as I-Pod, named the move after landing it at the 2013 X-Games.

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Economy
12:36 pm
Sat February 8, 2014

Teen workers: Where do their earnings go?

Credit Morguefile

Most teen workers spend instead of save.

That's according to a new University of Michigan study of 49,000 high school seniors from 1981 through 2011.  It's based on the Monitoring the Future study conducted annually by the University's Institute for Social Research.

The study found that the majority of high school workers spend at least half their pay on personal items like clothes, music, and eating out. And that hasn't changed in 30 years.

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Offbeat
4:28 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Livingston County food pantry to hold emergency food drive

Livingston County Salvation Army will hold emergency food drive Saturday
User Flickr

The Livingston County chapter of the Salvation Army is out of food.

Brighton Ford is organizing an emergency food drive called "Fill-A-Ford Full of Food" Saturday with the goal of restocking the food pantry of the Salvation Army. It will run from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Brighton VG's Fresh Market.

In recent weeks the food pantry was pulling money from a summer children's fund to purchase food from Gleaners Community Food Bank of Southeast Michigan, according to Karen Swieczkowski, community relations director at Brighton Ford. Brighton Ford is spearheading tomorrow's food drive.

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Sports
4:18 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Ann Arbor siblings head to winter Olympics

Siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani head to the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.
user: Marissa Babin

Usually brothers and sisters bicker and get in fights, but for Ann Arbor siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani, synchronization and working together is key. The Shibutanis are ice dancers, heading to Sochi, Russia for the 2014 Winter Olympics. 

Both began skating when they were under the age of 10, and have worked for many years for bragging rights such as being three-time medalists in the U.S. Championships for ice dancing, and earning the bronze medal at the 2011 World Championships. 

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Economy
3:33 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Rental market becomes out of reach for many Michiganders

A neighborhood in Detroit.
user: ifmuth

Over the past few years, renting a home has become more popular than owning one. However, according to a recent Harvard study, rent is quickly becoming unaffordable for most Americans.

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Arts & Culture
12:09 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

A rare Spanish painting rediscovered in Michigan now on display at the DIA

“The Infant Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness,” post-conservation treatment.
Detroit Institute of Arts Detroit Institute of Arts

A 17th century painting recently discovered in suburban Detroit is now on display at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

DIA Executive Director of Collection Strategies and Information Salvador Salort-Pons spotted “The Infant Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness,” a painting by Spanish artist Bartolome Esteban Murillo last year while lecturing at Meadow Brook Hall in Rochester.

The painting, which experts date to 1670, was purchased by Alfred and Matilda Wilson – the original owners of Meadow Brook Hall – in 1926. Matilda, the widow of Dodge co-founder John Francis Dodge, was a big art collector. She also co-founded the Oakland campus of Michigan State University, which is now Oakland University.

As part of a deal with OU, DIA conservators allowed art students at the university to get a rare glimpse of the entire conservation process. Though the museum often brings in high-school and college students, it's not often a group gets to watch a treatment from start to finish.

"Students were able to follow a full treatment and do this in more depth," Alfred Ackerman said, head of conservation at the museum. 

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Arts & Culture
10:54 am
Fri February 7, 2014

A project hopes to give away rehabbed houses in Detroit to aspiring writers

"The Apple House"
Andrew Kopietz

If we could transport ourselves back to Detroit at its prime, we might barely recognize the city: The streets bustled with a population of nearly two million, lights shone in the storefronts, and the neighborhoods were full.

Here how Detroit looked in the 1920s:

Today, the story is well known.

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Sports
12:37 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

These 13 Michigan athletes will be in the Winter Olympics in Sochi

At the Olympics in Sochi.
U.S. Olympic Team Facebook

It turns out that Michigan is really good on ice.

We've got 13 Olympic athletes going to Russia. Actually, they're probably already there since the opening ceremony is Friday.

The U.S. team is very serious as you can see.

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Education
6:11 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

Flint schools chief: No payless paydays this year

Administration Building, Flint Community Schools
Credit Flint Community Schools

There is no doubt that teachers in the Flint Community Schools will be paid through the end of the school year.

That's according to Interim Superintendent Larry Watkins.

Watkins said the state approved the Flint school district's deficit elimination plan today.

The district will get a $2.3 million advance on its state aid payments, and Watkins said the state authorized the district to borrow $3.6 million.

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Law
4:15 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Strong interest in new peacemaking court in Washtenaw County

Washtenaw County Judge Timothy Connors and Chief Judge Michael Petoskey of the Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi Indians, confer at Friday's peacemaking education session.
Credit Virginia Gordan

There appears to be a lot of interest in a new kind of court in Washtenaw County.

More than 80 lawyers, mediators, and probation officers packed Judge Timothy Connors' courtroom on Friday.

They were there for a six-hour education session on the Native American philosophy that guides the new peacemaking court. 

Read more

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