Michigan Radio Newsroom

News and Production Staff

Michigan Radio offers internships in its newsroom and production departments. Check our employment page for current openings.

*Updates coming soon!

Newsroom

Michelle Huan

Reem Nasr

Chrissy Yates

State of Opportunity

Megha Satyanarayana

Stateside

Bre'Anna Tinsley

Operations

Pages

Sports
12:37 pm
Wed February 5, 2014

These 13 Michigan athletes will be in the Winter Olympics in Sochi

At the Olympics in Sochi.
U.S. Olympic Team Facebook

It turns out that Michigan is really good on ice.

We've got 13 Olympic athletes going to Russia. Actually, they're probably already there since the opening ceremony is Friday.

The U.S. team is very serious as you can see.

Read more
Education
6:11 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

Flint schools chief: No payless paydays this year

Administration Building, Flint Community Schools
Credit Flint Community Schools

There is no doubt that teachers in the Flint Community Schools will be paid through the end of the school year.

That's according to Interim Superintendent Larry Watkins.

Watkins said the state approved the Flint school district's deficit elimination plan today.

The district will get a $2.3 million advance on its state aid payments, and Watkins said the state authorized the district to borrow $3.6 million.

Read more
Law
4:15 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Strong interest in new peacemaking court in Washtenaw County

Washtenaw County Judge Timothy Connors and Chief Judge Michael Petoskey of the Pokagon Band of the Potawatomi Indians, confer at Friday's peacemaking education session.
Credit Virginia Gordan

There appears to be a lot of interest in a new kind of court in Washtenaw County.

More than 80 lawyers, mediators, and probation officers packed Judge Timothy Connors' courtroom on Friday.

They were there for a six-hour education session on the Native American philosophy that guides the new peacemaking court. 

Read more
Health
2:59 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

The city of Detroit is understaffed for its stray animal problem

Researchers attempt to nail down the real number of stray animals in Detroit.
user: RTD Photography

The question of how many stray animals are in Detroit has been talked about ever since Bloomberg News put out this piece with the typical "Detroit is a hellhole" headline:

Abandoned Dogs Roam Detroit in Packs as Humans Dwindle

Chris Christoff reported that the city had "as many as 50,000 stray dogs."

Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek reported that other groups said there's no question that the number has been "wildly inflated."

Tom McPhee of the World Animal Awareness Society estimated there were between 1,000 to 3,000 stray dogs in the city.

Now, yet another estimate has been published.

Read more
Health
1:24 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Ann Arbor to consider limit on outdoor smoking

A proposed ordinance would prohibit smoking at bus stops and city parks
nick see flickr

It may soon become more difficult to smoke outdoors in Ann Arbor.

A proposed city ordinance would prohibit smoking at bus stops and parks designated by the city administrator.

It would also prohibit smoking near the entrances, windows and ventilation systems of city-owned buildings, which is already banned by a Washtenaw County ordinance.

The ordinance, introduced by council member Chuck Warpehoski, D-5th Ward, is on the agenda for Monday night's city council meeting.

Read more
Offbeat
1:04 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Looking for an offbeat vacation?

Tawas Point Lighthouse
Credit Peggy Allen / Tawas Point State Park

Live the life of a Victorian-era light keeper at Tawas Point Lighthouse.

That's the lure in an announcement this week that the Michigan Department of Natural Resources is accepting applications for 2014.

Volunteers stay in renovated living quarters in the lighthouse. The accommodations  include two bedrooms, a kitchen and bathroom. In return, volunteers pay $250 per week and lead tours of the lighthouse or perform maintenance work.

Read more
That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun February 2, 2014

Wacky weather words

Maybe polar vortex has not been a welcome addition to all of our vocabularies, but there are some other great weather words out there.

In this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan discuss regional words to describe the weather.

Depending on where we live, we use different names for a "light snow." According to the Dictionary of American Regional English, some speakers call this a skiff or a skift. However, in the Midwest and on the East Coast, people are more likely to use the terms dusting or flurry.

Read more
Offbeat
4:16 pm
Sat February 1, 2014

Ever consider being a lighthouse keeper?

How would you like to volunteer as a light keeper at the 138 year old Tawas Point Lighthouse? The Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced this week it's accepting applications for 2014.
Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Live the life of a Victorian-era light keeper at Tawas Point Lighthouse.

That's the lure in an announcement this week that the Michigan Department of Natural Resources is accepting applications for 2014.

Volunteers stay in renovated living quarters in the light house.

In return, they pay $250 per week, and lead tours or do maintenance work.

Read more
Offbeat
2:13 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

Fourth grader sworn in as Detroit Police Chief for the day

Detroit's Police Chief for the day is nine year old Jayvon Felton - a fourth grader who is fighting leukemia, but one day hopes to fight crime as a Detroit Police Officer.

This morning Jayvon made his way to work by helicopter, taking a ride from Coleman A. Young International Airport, over Belle Isle, Comerica Park and the Ambassador Bridge. Upon his arrival, he was greeted by a group of Detroit Police Officers, Felton's classmates from Roberto Clemente Academy, and Detroit Police Chief James Craig.

Read more
Weather
11:37 am
Fri January 31, 2014

Think this January's weather was crazy? Check out the U.P.'s blizzard of 1938

As meteorologist Karl Bohnak writes, it's hard to measure just how much snow accumulated in the blizzard of 1938 when snow piled up around utility poles. But we're guessing a lot.
Bill Brinkman NASA

Michigan may be “warming up” (31 degree heat wave, anyone?), but evidence of the latest snowpocalypse is still abundant.  

Over at MLive, meteorologist Mark Torregrossa reports that “mile for mile, Michigan has more snow cover than any other U.S. state.”

And as for ice, the Great Lakes are under the largest ice cover in 20 years. Sixty percent of all five lakes are now iced over.

Read more
Arts & Culture
10:03 am
Fri January 31, 2014

Listen to music from the whole Ann Arbor Folk Festival line up

Hill Auditorium is where the Ann Arbor Folk Festival is happening this weekend
user: Eamonn Flickr

The Ark started the Ann Arbor Folk Festival  in 1977. In nearly all of the past lineups, you'll find big names and local artists.

The festival is happening this weekend at Hill Auditorium. Both the Friday and Saturday shows are sold out. 

So, if you didn't get tickets in time, or you can't afford them, or the roads are too bad, or you had no idea that this existed, or you are lazy, you can listen to all the artists here. 

(I've constructed this list based on the list the Ark released, which they say is subject to change.)

Here's what you can hear on Friday:

Pearl and the Beard

Read more
Education
2:26 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

State of Opportunity's hour on what it's really like in a "low-performing" school

Michigan students may have more rigorous performance expectations on MEAP and other standardized tests.
Alberto G. Creative Commons

The MEAP test has been used to evaluate kids and schools in Michigan for over four and a half decades.

The test is meant to make sure public schools are teaching kids the basics. But MEAP scores affect where parents decide to send their kids, neighborhood housing prices, city tax revenue, and city services.

Basically, the economics of a city rests on how well 8 and 9-year-olds perform on this single test.

State of Opportunity's Dustin Dwyer spent six weeks inside Congress Elementary in Grand Rapids, a school with consistently low MEAP scores. Dwyer followed a third-grade class as they prepared to take the test. He interviewed students, teachers, and parents, trying to figure out how much these numbers matter. What he found was, the test scores do not even begin to tell the story.

To hear the documentary now and learn more, visit the State of Opportunity website. 

Health
11:44 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Hookah lounges are getting popular in Detroit, which has this doctor worried

Hookahs for sale.
Zack Lee Flickr

David Leveille published a story about the increasing popularity of hookah lounges in the Detroit area for PRI's The World.

Leveille spoke with pulmonologist Basim Dubayo, the associate chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine at Wayne State University's School of Medicine.

Read more
Education
11:36 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Students tell government officials about their high school experience

YouthSpeak forum in Washtenaw County
Credit Virginia Gordan

More than a dozen Michigan and Washtenaw County government officials listened attentively yesterday while students and recent graduates spoke about their experiences in Washtenaw County high schools.

The event, called YouthSpeak, was one of a series of youth public forums organized around the state by youth service organizations.

Some students said school policies do not take into account the poverty, homelessness, and family issues many students face. They said this has a negative impact on their education.

Read more
Education
12:53 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

DTE gives $1 million to Michigan Science Center in Detroit

Detroit Science Center, now known as the Michigan Science Center.
user: Liza Lagman Sperl

The DTE Energy Foundation plans to donate $1 million to the Michigan Science Center in Detroit.

According to their press release, the donation will span a period of five years, specifically funding the science center's STEM educational program (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

Read more
Law
1:59 pm
Sun January 26, 2014

Group calls Michigan's African-American homicide rate a public health crisis

African-Americans in Michigan are murdered at one of the highest rates in the nation. That's according to a study from the Violence Policy Center.

The Center says 31 of every 100,000 black Michiganders was a homicide victim in 2011. That's twice the national rate for blacks and seven times the rate for Americans overall.

Josh Sugarmann is the Center's executive director. He says this is part of a public health crisis in America.

Read more
That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun January 26, 2014

The ‘that,’ ‘who,’ ‘which’ dilemma

The pronoun who is for people and the pronoun that is for things, except when it’s the other way around.

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan discuss the confusing usage of who, that, and which.

Students are often taught that is for inanimate objects while who is for people. However, standard grammar books allow some variation on this rule.

In fact, the word that has referred to people for hundreds of years.

“You can go back to early translations of the Lord’s Prayer” Cruzan describes. “You will get ‘Our father, thou that art in heaven.” In this example, that refers to a person.

Read more
Economy
4:28 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

Congressional Democrats urge renewed unemployment benefits

Bytemarks flickr

More than 1.6 million Americans have lost their unemployment insurance since the end of 2013.

Congress allowed federal legislation designed to give job seekers unemployment benefits to expire on Dec. 28.

Congressional Democrats have called on Republicans to support legislation that would revive unemployment benefits.

Sen. Jack Reed, D-Rhode Island, who authored legislation to extend unemployment benefits, said partisan gridlock could cause the number of people without unemployment benefits to double by the end of the year.

Read more
Education
11:10 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Who is Dr. Mark Schlissel, the next president of the University of Michigan?

Dr. Mark Schlissel, the University of Michigan's 14th president.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

This morning, Dr. Mark Schlissel was named the 14th president of the University of Michigan. Dr. Schlissel most recently served as provost of Brown University.

The university Board of Regents appointed Schlissel unanimously.

According to the university’s press release, Schlissel will succeed Mary Sue Coleman on July 1, 2014.

Read more
Education
10:17 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Dr. Mark Schlissel is the 14th president of the University of Michigan

Dr. Mark Schlissel is the 14th president of the University of Michigan
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

This morning, Dr. Mark Schlissel was named the 14th president of the University of Michigan. Dr. Schlissel most recently served as provost of Brown University.

Schlissel graduated from Princeton University in 1979. He later received his MD and PhD from Johns Hopkins University of Medicine. 

Pages