Michigan Radio Newsroom

News and Production Staff

Michigan Radio offers internships in its newsroom and production departments. Check our employment page for current openings.

Newsroom

Julia Field

Julia recently graduated from the University of Michigan with a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology and Urban Studies. Having spent the last two summers interning for a Detroit nonprofit and a NGO in India, she decided to dabble in online news journalism. As a university student, she was involved in the student organization, Human Rights Through Education and the Detroit Partnership.  Although she was raised in rural West Michigan, much of her time at the university was spent either in Detroit or studying it. She is interested in urban planning and policy, community redevelopment, and public health issues. After her internship this summer, she leaves for the Dominican Republic as a Peace Corps volunteer.

Rebecca Guerriero

Rebecca Guerriero is a senior at the University of Michigan studying in the Program in the Environment (Environmental Science). She is a Graham Sustainability Scholar and focuses her studies on water resource management and sustainable city growth and development. Rebecca is from Northville, Michigan and loves everything “Pure Michigan” – it is her dream to visit every Great Lakes lighthouse. Rebecca is writing her Senior Honors Thesis on sustainable golf course design and management. She works at NOAA’s Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments Center as a research assistant and webmaster and as a summer orientation Peer Academic Advisor for the Honors Program. She enjoys coffee, camping, traveling, the Italian language, the West Wing, and a good stack of books. Her perfect idea of happiness is playing pond hockey with the 1980 Olympic Team. After graduation, Rebecca plans to trek across Canada and watch the entire Lord of the Rings trilogy in one sitting for the first time.

Lindsay Hall

Lindsay Hall is a senior studying Political Science and Psychology at the University of Michigan. She was born in Cape Town, South Africa and moved with her family to Ann Arbor when at five years old. Last winter term Lindsay was fortunate enough to return to South Africa to study at the University of Cape Town and pursue interests in early childhood education and development as a mentor at a local primary school. She is excited for the opportunity to join the Michigan Radio team this semester and experience what it is like to work within the field of communications.

Alana Holland

Alana Holland is finishing  double major degrees in Broadcasting and Journalism from Grand Valley State University before she takes over the reporting world. Even though she's from the small-town Gaylord, Michigan, she has a heart for big cities and loves travel. In her college, Alana is an anchor and reporter for the student-run TV news station, GV Today, was Layout and Design Editor for the newspaper, the Lanthorn, and has interned for Wood TV-8 and Thunder 94.5 radio. Alana spent a summer studying theater in London, her first taste at travel and learning about culture firsthand. Her goal is to work in international journalism, hoping to eventually become the next Christiane Amanpour. She is a self admitted coffee addict, fashion fanatic, vegetarian, photographer, and lover of all things British. In the next ten years she hopes to ride Asian elephants in India, publish a book, attend a New York Fashion Week, hike Machu Picchu, and learn cook. Ultimately though, she enjoys hearing and telling people's stories, and hopes to have what she does with her work improve other people’s lives.

Sarah Kerson

Sarah is an Ann Arbor native and a graduate of Community High School, where she was an editor of its online student newspaper. She spent her freshman year of college at the University of Vermont studying the social sciences and worked as an investigative reporter for UVM's student newspaper. Sarah also enjoys writing poetry, and was a finalist in the 2012 Ann Arbor Youth Poetry Slam. She is excited to expand her journalism and media experience to public radio.

Melanie Kruvelis

Melanie is a rising senior at the University of Michigan, studying Political Science. A Michigan native, Melanie serves as the Editorial Page Editor at The Michigan Daily, managing a staff of more than 40 columnists, bloggers and editorial board members during the school year. Last winter, Melanie spent five months in Madrid, taking classes at a local university and traveling as much as humanly possible on the weekends. She enjoys all things 90s, ukuleles, and the oxford comma.

Lucy Perkins

Lucy is from Suttons Bay, Michigan and is a senior at the University of Michigan, studying English and Communications. She has worked as an Arts writer for The Michigan Daily, as a writing workshop facilitator for the Prison Creative Arts Project, and as an editorial intern at Traverse Magazine. Last year, Lucy spent five months in Buenos Aires, Argentina taking classes and squeezing in weekend travels whenever possible. While in Buenos Aires, she interned for an English newspaper, The Argentina Independent. Lucy is interested in print and radio, and wants to tell real stories, especially about people who may not otherwise have a voice. She enjoys reading, eating barbecue pizza, and playing with puppies.

Dr. Nishant Sekaran

Nishant has been a Clinical Lecturer at the University of Michigan Medical School, and is a staff physician at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. He has an M.D. degree from Vanderbilt University, and an M.Science in Health Related Research from the University of Michigan. Among his peer reviewed publications are “Hot unstable angina—is it worse than subacute unstable angina?” You can schedule an office visit with Dr. Sekaran to get the answer to that question. 

Chris Zollars

Chris is your basic born again journalist.  He reawakened his enthusiasm for radio news after years in the corporate sector writing and producing video and interactive marketing and training projects.  He holds a Masters in Journalism from the University of Illinois and a Bachelor of Science in Mass Communications from Southern Illinois University.  Chris started his journalism travels at his town’s daily paper as a teenager and during his undergrad also worked at SIU-Edwardsville’s NPR affiliate (WSIE-FM).   Chris then served five years as a commissioned officer in the US Coast Guard and was Managing Editor/Internal Relations Manager during the first Gulf War.  While in graduate school, he worked in the newsroom at WDWS-AM/WHMS-FM in Champaign, Illinois, and at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications specializing in science/technology stories.  He and his wife live up near Fenton with their 2 dogs, 2 birds, and 7 horses.

State of Opportunity

Kimberly Springer

Kimberly is excited to be back in public radio after several years spent teaching at the university and researching level in the US and abroad in London. She is currently a student in UM's School of Information Master of Science program specializing in social computing and archives/records management. Kimberly’s goal is to work in social media and/or digital archives and curation. To that end, she spends most of her spare time "curating" her Spotify collection, waiting for Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead to come back, and planning for zombie apocalypse. Ask her: she has a plan.

Stateside

Austin Davis

Austin Davis is a sophomore at the University of Michigan pursuing a degree in German Language and Communications Studies. He grew up not too far away from Ann Arbor in Rochester Hills, Michigan where his family still resides.  Although he is unsure of his future career path, he hopes to do work in global reporting/journalism and multi-media production. Although this is Austin’s first time working in a radio station, he has previous experience writing for an online publication and working on local political campaigns. He has thoroughly enjoyed his time here at Michigan Radio, and is excited for the further prospects of this internship.

Operations

Chrissy Zamaron

Crissy is the Operations Intern at Michigan Radio and a senior at U of M earning her BA in both English Language and Literature and Spanish Language and Culture. She has a passion for the art of storytelling and is a genuine NPR fanatic. After graduating this May, she hopes to stay in the public radio family by gaining a position at any one of her favorite NPR shows. Outside of her internship, Crissy loves Latin dancing, singing and endless hours of television crime dramas.

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Offbeat
12:35 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Holiday lights brighten up Detroit's Michigan Central Depot

Snowflake lights brighten up the Michigan Central Depot in Detroit.
Michigan Central Station Preservation Society Facebook

Detroit’s Michigan Central Depot is looking a little more cheery today.

For the second year in a row, the former train station which now serves as the quintessential symbol of Detroit's urban decay, is decking the halls with holiday lights. According to The Detroit News, Matty Moroun, who bought the building in 1996, came up with the idea of sprucing up the 18-story abandoned station with the help of his family.

“Since we’ve put electricity back in, we decided to light it up, and it looks really nice,” President of the Detroit International Bridge Co. Dan Stamper said. “We’ve gotten a lot of nice comments and we just hope everyone has a happy holiday.”

Electric lighting has returned to the building as part of an effort to (slowly) give the station a facelift. Back in 2011, the International Bridge Co. began to replace windows and stairwells in MCD. 

- Melanie Kruvelis, Michigan Radio Newsroom

Politics & Government
11:58 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Where do Michiganders go when they leave the state?

Are you leaving Michigan or coming to it?
user dvs Flickr

Approximately 1.7 million Americans moved to a different state in 2012. But from where are people leaving, and where do they go?

A recent infographic by Chris Walker visualizes American migration patterns. It shows Americans are flocking to Florida, and more people are leaving Michigan than moving to the state.

According to the Census data that informed the infographic, about 134,000 Americans migrated to the Mitten State in 2012. More than 175,000 left the state.

So where do Michiganders go when they leave the mitten?

Read more
Politics & Government
7:30 am
Fri November 22, 2013

In this morning's headlines: Guns in Lansing library, oil and gas taxes, Whitmer will not run

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Lansing public library's effort to ban openly carried firearms has ended

"The Michigan Supreme Court has decided not to hear an appeal of a case involving libraries and guns. Lansing’s library system had banned openly carried firearms in its branches.  But the Court of Appeals found that violated a state law preventing local units of government from banning weapons," Steve Carmody reports.

Bill would affect taxes related to oil and gas wells

A bill in Lansing would exempt things like piping, machinery, tanks and other equipment used to develop oil and gas wells from personal property taxes. As the Detroit Free Press reports,

"Leaders of some of Michigan's poorest counties in the northern Lower Peninsula say the change would cost their communities millions of dollars while giving a tax break to oil and gas companies."

Gretchen Whitmer will not be on 2014 ballot

Senate minority leader Gretchen Whitmer confirmed yesterday she will not be on the statewide ballot in 2014. As the Detroit Free Press reports,

"She announced early this year that she wasn’t going to run for governor in 2014. But speculation had been rampant that Whitmer could be a serious and credible candidate for Attorney General or Lieutenant Governor. 'But it’s just not the time,' she told the Free Press Thursday. 'My girls are 10 and 11, and I thought when they got to this age they wouldn’t need me as much, but they need me more.'"

Law
12:43 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

This report highlights how some Michigan cities are supporting the LGBT community

This is a map of the cities that the Human Rights Campaign included in the index
Screenshot of the MEI Human Rights Campaign

The Human Rights Campaign released their 2013 Municipal Equality Index (MEI). The index evaluated cities level of support for LGBT people despite state regulations and policies.

The index includes 291 cities, or 77,851,822 people.

Every state capitol was included, as well as the three largest cities in each state. The index also focused on municipalities with the largest public universities, and cities with high proportions of same-sex couples.

 

Read more
Offbeat
12:00 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

VIDEO: Real-life Polar Express back on the tracks in Michigan

The Pere Marquette 1225 rolls into view in Owosso
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

The steam engine that inspired the children's book The Polar Express and provided sounds for the movie version is back in service after a four-year refurbishment project.

The Pere Marquette 1225 rolled out of the garage Wednesday in Owosso, ringing its bell and spewing steam for train enthusiasts and volunteers gathered to watch the engine take its maiden voyage following the overhaul.

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Politics & Government
7:59 am
Thu November 21, 2013

In this morning's headlines: Budget director's brother, Detroit bankruptcy, Heidelberg burns

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Budget director's brother proposes $5 million state project

"A company run by the brother of Michigan’s budget director proposed a $5 million project that is part of the state budget. The company is now bidding to win the contract," Rick Pluta reports.

Report blames Wall Street for Detroit bankruptcy filing

"A new report says declining revenues and bad Wall Street deals contributed the most to Detroit’s bankruptcy. The report from the think tank Demos argues that Detroit IS bankrupt — but that’s because of the city’s cash flow problems, not its debt," Sarah Cwiek reports.

Another Heidelberg house up in flames

"Fire has destroyed another house that makes up the Heidelberg Project outdoor art installation in Detroit. The fire burned early this morning at the structure known as the Penny House on the city's east side. A building known as the "House of Soul" was destroyed by fire earlier this month," the Associated Press reports.

Politics & Government
8:18 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Detroit high school students rally in support of affirmative action

Virginia Gordan

More than 100 Detroit high school students rallied in support of affirmative action at the University of Michigan today.

The protest was organized by the group, By Any Means Necessary, whose case challenging Proposal Two was combined with another and argued at the U.S. Supreme Court on October 15.  The voter-approved amendment banned affirmative action in public university admissions in Michigan.

Read more
Politics & Government
11:45 am
Tue November 19, 2013

France has a travel advisory for those traveling to Detroit and other US cities

Greetings from France.
user: melancolie en velours Flickr

The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs issued a warning to French tourists traveling to the United States. 

The security recommendations cite Detroit as a city whose "center is not recommended after the close of business."

Other cities included on the advisory list were: Boston, New York, Chicago, Washington, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Houston, St. Louis, Atlanta, New Orleans, and the entire state of Florida.

Read more
The Environment Report
9:00 am
Tue November 19, 2013

This is what a playground for kids with disabilities looks like

Haisley's new playground includes ramps for kids in wheelchairs.
Sarah Kerson Michigan Radio

Ask any kid about their favorite part of the school day and they’ll likely give you one response - recess.

But for kids with disabilities, going outside isn’t always easy.  Traditional playgrounds aren’t always safe for these kids.

Haisley Elementary in Ann Arbor just renovated its playground to specifically accommodate for students with disabilities.

The school has a large population of kids with disabilities. Most of these kids can’t talk. Many have a hard time sitting up right. Some are in wheelchairs. Some have Autism.

Read more
Law
2:58 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Ann Arbor's controversial crosswalk law could be repealed

Crosswalk
Credit Morguefile

The Ann Arbor City Council will vote tonight on whether to repeal the city's crosswalk ordinance.

State law requires cars to stop only after pedestrians have entered a crosswalk.

But the Ann Arbor ordinance also requires cars to stop for pedestrians who are waiting on the curb.

Councilman Stephen Kunselman (D-Ward 3) said the local ordinance creates unsafe conditions.

Read more
Politics & Government
7:55 am
Mon November 18, 2013

In this morning's headlines: 460,000 without power, six wolves killed, minimum wage increase

Morning News Roundup, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011
User: Brother O'Mara Flickr

460,000 without power

A storm with winds up to 70 miles per hour and heavy rain knocked down trees and power lines across Michigan yesterday. 460,000 homes and businesses are without power. Consumers Energy says power should be restored by late Wednesday for most customers and by Thursday for those in isolated areas.

Six wolves killed in hunt

"Michigan’s controversial wolf hunt wrapped up  its first weekend with just six wolves killed in the first three days. Michigan wildlife officials have set a goal of 43 wolves in this year’s hunt," Steve Carmody reports.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate wants to raise minimum wage to $9.25

"Mark Schauer says he'll make raising the minimum wage a top priority as Michigan governor. The Democratic gubernatorial candidate is proposing to increase Michigan's minimum wage from $7.40 an hour to $9.25 per hour over three years," the Associated Press reports.

That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun November 17, 2013

The correct use of myriad and plethora

Most people agree that a myriad is a lot, but there’s less agreement about how to use myriad correctly.

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan examine three words that mean a lotmyriad, plethora and ton.

When choosing between myriad possibilities and a myriad of possibilities, which phrase is correct?

Myriad of is older than myriad with the noun,” Curzan explains. “Myriad comes into English in the 16th century when the word originally means 10,000, a specific number.” The word changed from referring to 10,000 of something, to meaning a countless number of something.

When myriad first appeared in English, it was always plural and followed by of, such as many myriads of men. Then, in 1609, the singular form of myriad was first used, followed again by of. This allowed for phrases like a myriad of bubbles. Finally, in the 18th century, the noun was first dropped from the phrase. At that time, the saying myriad beauties was then considered correct.

Today, both phrases are used. Although myriad of is a bit more common than myriad followed by a noun, either expression can be used.

Read more
Economy
3:59 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

The 10 Michigan communities with the highest legacy costs

Detroit has the third-highest legacy debt per capita.
Patricia Drury Flickr

To call Detroit’s legacy costs underfunded would be, well, an understatement.

According to the city’s numbers, Detroit’s pension and retiree healthcare funds are about $9.2 billion short.

But Detroit is not the only Michigan city with major legacy costs — not by a long shot.

Legacy costs, or costs undertaken by local government for future use, have been taken on by more than 280 of Michigan’s 1,800 communities, according to data compiled by Bridge Magazine.

And while Detroit has the highest amount of total unfunded legacy cost, the per capita numbers show a slightly different picture.

Read more
Politics & Government
1:35 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Michigan's first regulated wolf hunt is now underway

The tally of wolves killed in each region as of 6am, Nov. 15.
Credit Department of Natural Resources

The season will run from Nov. 15 until Dec. 31 — unless 43 of the state’s estimated 658 wolves are killed before the end of December. That’s the limit set by Michigan’s Department of Natural Resources.

But MDNR officials suggest that the odds will not be in the hunters’ favor.

Read more
Economy
12:21 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Eight Michigan cities chosen for development projects

A map of the proposed project in Detroit.
Credit Michigan Municipal League

The Michigan Municipal League is supporting eight communities with development projects. Those projects are part of the PlacePlan program.

It's a partnership between Michigan State University, the Michigan Municipal League and the Michigan State Housing Authority. The projects are focused on increasing economic activity in those communities.

Luke Forest is with the Michigan Municipal League. He says these projects will make Michigan cities more attractive to employers and young people.

Read more
Politics & Government
6:59 am
Fri November 15, 2013

In this morning's headlines: Wolf hunt, anti-blight bill, dark money

User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Wolf hunt starts today

Michigan's first wolf hunt in modern time starts today.

"The hunt will take place in three specific zones of the Upper Peninsula. State wildlife officials hope hunters will kill 43 wolves during the hunt. There are an estimated 658 wolves in the U.P.," Steve Carmody reports.

House clears anti-blight bill

"Legislation meant to crack down on blight in several Michigan cities has cleared the state House. The bills would increase penalties for property owners who break blight laws that are already in place," Jake Neher reports.

Senate votes to increase campaign funding limits

"Republicans in the Michigan Senate have voted to boost donor limits to some types of political funds, and to allow the people who bankroll so-called “issue ads” to remain anonymous," Rick Pluta reports

Weekly Political Roundup
5:25 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Weekly Political Roundup: Campaign donation limits, impact on 2014 elections

wikimedia commons

Each Thursday we talk Michigan politics with Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants, and Susan Demas, publisher of Inside Michigan Politics. 

This morning, Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson proposed new rules that would require more disclosure of who pays for issue ads. The Senate added language to block the Secretary of State’s proposal, and approved a bill that would double the amount an individual could contribute to a candidate or a candidate committee.

“What the Secretary of State is trying to do is level a very unequal playing field when it comes to financing campaigns,” Sikkema explains. “Right now, a candidate committee has to disclose everybody who gave any amount of money, and there are severe limits on how much an individual can give. But independent committees do not have to disclose and there are no limits as to contributions.”

After moving quickly through the Senate, this proposal now faces the House.

Read more
Law
4:31 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Lawmakers consider tougher penalties for animal neglect and cruelty

Puppy Mill
Credit Wikimedia

Two bi-partisan bills that subject pet shop operators and breeders to rules against animal neglect and cruelty are on their way to the Michigan House.

Senate Bills 285 and 286 also toughen penalties for animal neglect or cruelty, depending on the offender's prior convictions and the number of animals involved.

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Education
2:15 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

How one Detroit charter school captured national attention — and what educators have to say about it

Teacher Danielle Johnson and Detroit Achievement Academy founder Kyle Smitley on the Ellen Degeneres show.
YouTube YouTube

This week on State of Opportunity, Sarah Alvarez is taking a look at some radical decisions that have shaped the educational landscape of Detroit schools.

Today, families in the city are taking a gamble on brand-new charter schools, like the Detroit Achievement Academy.

The academy opened earlier this year, by 28-year-old Kyle Smitley. Smitley is the first to admit she lacks formal educational experience. "I’ve been laughed out of so many rooms coming into the education world," she says.

But that hasn’t stopped the unconventional school from getting national buzz. Earlier this year, Smitley and the academy were featured on The Ellen Degeneres Show.

Still, the odds are stacked up against the academy and other charter schools that pop up in Detroit. There are more seats in Detroit schools than students. Many students in the city haven’t met benchmark requirements in their grade levels.

So what do educational experts think about these experimental schools? Check out Sarah’s piece for more. 

Politics & Government
12:25 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Healthcare enrollment numbers are low in Michigan, here's our experience

Why won't healthcare.gov work?
use: dougwoods Flickr

Yesterday, the Department of Heath and Human Services released a detailed enrollment report on the number of people who looked for insurance coverage from October 1 to November 2.

The number of people who enrolled in coverage is low.

According to the report, 23,987 applications were completed in Michigan. Of those completed applications, only 1,329 enrolled in a plan.

What's the difference between 'completed application' and 'enrollment?'

Read more

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