NPR Guy Raz

Guy Raz is the weekend host of NPR News' signature afternoon newsmagazine All Things Considered. Raz was named host of the program in July 2009, after serving as an NPR foreign and domestic correspondent for nearly a decade.

Every Saturday and Sunday, weekend All Things Considered introduces listeners to the stories behind the headlines and the voices of people who are changing the world. Guests of the program are just as likely to include Bill Gates talking about innovation as Eminem explaining his rhyme schemes. The program features music and interviews from artists like Bjork to the maestro of the San Francisco Symphony Michael Tilson Thomas.

Weekend All Things Considered is a different kind of newsmagazine. It's a place where you'll hear Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick discussing his late father's jazz career, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg talking about being awkward or a variety of international leaders discuss the topics of the day. Raz is the creator of the show's popular "Three-Minute Fiction" writing contest. Each round, he invites a well-known author to judge original works of fiction submitted by the listeners.

Raz joined NPR in 1997 as an intern for All Things Considered and he worked his way through the ranks of the organization. His first job was the assistant to NPR's legendary news analyst Daniel Schorr. Raz then served as a general assignment reporter covering stories ranging from the early 2000 presidential primaries to a profile on the Doors' song "Light My Fire."

In 2000, at the age of 25, Raz was made NPR's Berlin bureau chief where he covered eastern Europe and the Balkans. Later, he was transferred to London as the bureau chief and covered the war in Iraq. Raz left NPR in 2004, to work as CNN's Jerusalem correspondent chronicling everything from the rise of Hamas as a political power to the incapacitation of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Israel's 2005 withdrawal from the Gaza Strip. Two years later Raz returned to NPR to serve as defense correspondent where he covered the Pentagon and the US military.

During his six years abroad, Raz reported from more than 40 countries, with a focus on Iraq, Israel and the Palestinian Territories, Afghanistan, Eastern Europe and the Balkans. He profiled and interviewed dozens of world leaders, including former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, Shimon Peres, General David Petraeus and Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Michael Mullen.

For his reporting from Iraq, Raz was awarded both the Edward R. Murrow Award and the Daniel Schorr Journalism prize. His reporting has contributed to two duPont Awards and one Peabody awarded to NPR. He's been a finalist for the Livingston Award four times. For his reporting from Germany, Raz was awarded both the RIAS Berlin prize and the Arthur F. Burns Award. In 2008, he spent a year as a Nieman journalism fellow at Harvard University where he studied classical history.

Raz's written work has appeared in Salon, Washington City Paper, The Washington Post, The Christian Science Monitor and the German daily, Sueddeutsche Zeitung.

Law
5:35 pm
Sat April 21, 2012

Untouched, Thousands Of Rape Kits Await Justice

Wayne County prosecutor Kym Worthy (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 10:46 pm

In 2009, prosecutors in Detroit discovered more than 11,000 boxes of potential evidence in rape cases left completely unprocessed. Row upon row of what are called "rape kits" remained untouched on shelves in a police evidence room for years. No DNA evidence was extracted; no DNA evidence was used to catch or prosecute the assailants.

Since then, Wayne County prosecutor Kym Worthy has lead the effort to sort through those 11,000 rape kits and to find the funding to get them processed.

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